Sunday, September 30, 2018

Fire In-Flight (Non-Impact): Cirrus SR22, N818GM; accident occurred September 30, 2018 near Addison Airport (KADS), Dallas County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Irving, Texas
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N818GM

Location: Addison, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA392
Date & Time: 09/30/2018, 1121 CDT
Registration: N818GM
Aircraft: Cirrus SR22
Aircraft Damage:Substantial 
Defining Event: Fire/smoke (non-impact)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On September 30, 2018, about 1121 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR22 airplane, N818GM, impacted terrain following a total loss of engine power near Addison Airport (ADS), Dallas, Texas. The pilot and flight instructor were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which departed ADS about 1115, with a destination of Waco Regional Airport (ACT), Waco, Texas.

While on departure climbing through 2,800 ft mean sea level, the pilot and flight instructor noticed multiple avionics malfunctions and turned back toward ADS. During this turn, the engine lost total power and indications of a fire were noticed. When the flight instructor and pilot recognized the airplane was not within gliding distance of ADS or a suitable forced landing area, the pilot initiated the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS). The airplane descended under parachute into a parking lot and the main spar was damaged. Accident site examination revealed a hole near the lower right engine cowling from a burn through.

Examination at the recovery facility revealed two of the three sets of hardware were missing from the muffler attach point. The remaining bolt, washers, spring and castellated nut remained attached, but no cotter pin was installed. Without the muffler attachment hardware, the exhaust collector was free to rotate. The hole in the lower right engine cowling was consistent with escaping hot exhaust gas.

Various components in the right forward side of the firewall were thermally damaged. Numerous white areas consistent with electrical arcing were present, including both magneto p-leads shorted against the metal engine mount frame. Although both magneto p-leads were shorted, the two magnetos were not damaged. After the magneto p-leads were disconnected, the magnetos produced sparks at all ignition leads when the engine was manually rotated.

During a pre-buy inspection of the airplane, a report prepared by the maintenance provider listed issues discovered and corrective actions performed. Two of the entries were "#1-cylinder base o-ring is seeping" and "replaced #1-cylinder base o-ring P/N 641066 IAW TCM IO-550-N MN CH17-3". The work order to replace the cylinder o-ring, dated three days prior to the accident, required removal and reinstallation of the muffler. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 44, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: BasicMed
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/19/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/19/2018
Flight Time:  509 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2 hours (Total, this make and model), 494 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 38 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 14 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Commercial
Age: 27, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/25/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/15/2017
Flight Time:  1514 hours (Total, all aircraft), 113 hours (Total, this make and model), 1289 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 78 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 53 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cirrus
Registration: N818GM
Model/Series: SR22
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 0256
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 05/23/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 13 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1334 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed
Engine Model/Series: IO-550N
Registered Owner: Brian Lenzmeier
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDAL, 488 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1139 CDT
Direction from Accident Site: 202°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2000 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3500 ft agl
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 160°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 21°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Dallas, TX (ADS)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Waco, TX (ACT)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 1115 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class B

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: In-Flight
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 32.896944, -96.834167 (est)

Location: Addison, TX
Accident Number: CEN18LA392
Date & Time: 09/30/2018, 1121 CDT
Registration: N818GM
Aircraft: Cirrus SR22
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

On September 30, 2018, about 1121 central daylight time, a Cirrus SR22 airplane, N818GM, impacted terrain following a loss of engine power near Addison Airport (ADS), Dallas, Texas. The pilot and flight instructor were not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as an instructional flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which departed ADS about 1115 and was destined for Waco Regional Airport (ACT), Waco, Texas.

While on departure climb about 2,800 ft above mean sea level, the pilot and flight instructor noticed multiple avionics malfunctions and turned back toward ADS. During this turn, the engine lost total power and indications of a fire were noticed. After the flight instructor and pilot recognized the airplane was not within gliding distance of ADS or a suitable forced landing area, the pilot initiated the Cirrus Airframe Parachute System (CAPS). The airplane descended under parachute into a parking lot and the main spar was damaged. On-site examination revealed the right side of the engine cowling was burned through near the exhaust system. The airplane was retained for further examination.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cirrus
Registration: N818GM
Model/Series: SR22
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KDAL, 488 ft msl
Observation Time: 1139 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 3 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 21°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 2000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots / , 160°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 3500 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Dallas, TX (ADS)
Destination: Waco, TX (ACT)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: In-Flight
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  32.896944, -96.834167 (est)






The pilot of a single-engine plane made an emergency landing shortly after taking off from Addison Airport Sunday morning.

There were no injuries reported.

Shortly after taking off from Addison at around 11:15 a.m., the pilot of the Cirrus SR22 reported engine and instrument troubles, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. 

The pilot attempted to return to the airport but instead declared an emergency. The pilot told air traffic control the plane would not be able to make it back to Addison.

The Federal Aviation Administration said the pilot deployed the Cirrus’ emergency parachute with the plane coming to rest near Alpha Road, about a mile and a half south of the airport.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wfaa.com

7 comments:

  1. wow, a cirrus pilot who actually pulled the chute. Good for him.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I noticed the pilot side window busted out. I wonder if he did that to help clear smoke from the cockpit due to the engine fire? The chute worked as designed, glad everyone was OK.

    ReplyDelete
  3. why not just open the door rather than break the window?

    ReplyDelete
  4. Because the door would stay shut if it was still moving forward.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Take off your shoe and use it to prop open the door ... easy, convenient and simple.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I've tried to open a cirrus door while in flight, even at low cruise speeds it was extremely difficult to barely move it. I had to divert to another airport and slam the door shut. Shitty design or maintenance didn't fix it correctly.


    If you're wondering why, the door latches in my model were finicky. They would seem latched but wouldn't be, you would know once in flight by all the slipstream noise.

    ReplyDelete