Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Nanchang CJ-6A, N192NG, registered to G&C CJ6 LLC and operated by the pilot: Fatal accident occurred April 27, 2017 in Keene, Kern County, California

  
Gutierrez, Gilbert
 
Gilbert Gutierrez was a successful registered professional engineer and philanthropist who passed away at age 75 on April 27, 2017. He joined the army in 1963 and was later honorably discharged. From the military he attended Arizona State University and received both a BSE and MSE in chemical engineering. After getting married and having two sons, he founded and operated a successful engineering business in 1980. During his professional career he served on several boards including but not limited to the EPA, Selective Service, and the Professional Engineering Review Board of the State of Arizona. He has been involved in Rotary for over 20 years and started flying, his dream in 2001. He passed away following his dream. He loved his family and did everything he could to help and be there for them. That love and assistance extended beyond his family through his charity work, friendships, and stopping for the random person on the street that needed a helping hand.

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Fresno, California

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N192NG




Location: Keene, CA
Accident Number: WPR17FA091
Date & Time: 04/27/2017, 1350 PDT
Registration: N192NG
Aircraft: NANCHANG CJ6A
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 27, 2017, about 1350 Pacific daylight time, a Nanchang CJ6A airplane, N192NG, was destroyed when it impacted terrain near Keene, California. The private pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to G&C CJ6 LLC and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight originated from the Apple Valley Airport (APV), Apple Valley, California, about 1255, with an intended destination of Porterville, California.

According to three friends of the pilot, they and the pilot were flying together in a four-airplane formation and had originally departed from Phoenix, Arizona, earlier in the morning. They made a fuel-stop at APV, and, following lunch and a brief delay for weather, the flight of four departed APV en route to Porterville. They were flying in a diamond formation, and the accident pilot was to the left of the lead pilot (the number 2 position). As the flight neared Tehachapi, California, the formation was at an altitude of about 7,500 ft mean sea level (msl), flying above an overcast-to-broken cloud layer that covered the area. As they passed Tehachapi, the formation began a shallow descent. During the descent, the lead pilot lost sight of the accident airplane and asked the pilot if he was ok, to which the accident pilot responded that he was.

A short time later, the lead pilot asked the accident pilot a second time if he was ok, and the accident pilot responded that he was. Subsequently, the pilot in the slot position (behind the lead pilot) noticed that the accident airplane was behind his position and lower. The pilot in the slot position eventually lost sight of the accident airplane and maneuvered to reestablish visual contact but was unsuccessful. The pilot who was flying to the right of the lead pilot (the number 3 position) observed the accident airplane fly into a cloud layer while in a wings-level, slightly nose-low attitude, behind and below his position. The formation flight never reestablished radio or visual contact with the accident pilot or airplane.

A witness who was in a vehicle near the accident site reported that she observed the airplane descend from a cloud layer in an almost vertical attitude until she lost sight of it behind a mountain.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 75, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/22/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 500 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. A third-class special issuance airman medical certificate was issued to the pilot on May 22, 2015, with the limitation, "not valid for any class after 5/31/2017." The pilot reported on his most recent medical certificate application that he had accumulated 500 hours of flight experience of which 40 hours were in the previous 6 months. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: NANCHANG
Registration: N192NG
Model/Series: CJ6A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1975
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 3051217
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: Unknown
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2901 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:
Engine Manufacturer: Huosai
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: HS-6A
Registered Owner: G&C CJ6 LLC
Rated Power: 285
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The two-seat, low-wing, retractable-gear airplane, serial number 3051217, was manufactured in 1975. It was powered by a 285-horsepower Huosai HS-6A engine driving a two-bladed, composite, controllable-pitch propeller. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KTSP, 4001 ft msl
Observation Time: 2055 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 5 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 139°
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Temperature/Dew Point: 12°C / 8°C
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 1700 ft agl
Visibility: 9 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 26 knots/ 35 knots, 290°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.93 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Apple Valley, CA (APV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Porterville, CA (PTV)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1255 PDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

At 1355, the reported weather conditions at the Tehachapi Airport (TSP), located about 5 miles southeast of the accident site, were wind from 290° at 26 knots gusting to 35 knots, visibility 9 statute miles, broken cloud layer at 1,700 ft, overcast cloud layer at 2,500 ft, temperature 12°C, dew point 8°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.93 inches of mercury. 



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 35.195833, -118.503611 

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted hilly terrain about 5 miles northwest of TSP. The airplane came to rest in an almost vertical attitude on a magnetic heading of about 249°. All of the major structural components of the airplane and wreckage debris, including canopy material, metal debris, and foam, were located within about 100 ft of the main wreckage.

The left wing was separated from the fuselage and came to rest about 8 ft north of the main wreckage. The aileron and flap remained attached to the wing structure. The entire wing exhibited leading edge compression aft to the aileron and flap.

The right wing was partially separated from the fuselage. The aileron and flap remained attached to the wing structure. The entire wing exhibited leading edge compression aft to the aileron and flap. A swath of displaced dirt similar to the size of the right wing was observed directly under the wing structure.

The fuselage structure was severely crushed aft. The empennage structure was compressed into the cabin and engine areas. The vertical stabilizer, rudder, left and right horizontal stabilizers, and left and right elevators remained partially attached to their respective mounts. The forward and aft cockpit areas were severely fragmented. The instrument panels were fragmented with numerous instruments displaced.

Flight control continuity was established throughout the airframe from the cockpit controls to all primary flight control surfaces. Numerous separations in the control cables were observed. The separated ends of the cables exhibited signatures consistent with overload.

The engine exhibited extensive impact damage to all cylinders and the crankcase. The accessory case was impact damaged and separated from the engine. The crankshaft could not be rotated by hand due to impact damage. Mechanical continuity was established throughout the engine and valve train. The magnetos, starter, carburetor, and propeller governor were separated and exhibited extensive impact damage, which precluded functional testing of the components. Portions of both propeller blades were located within the recovered wreckage and were separated from the propeller hub. The propeller blades exhibited chordwise striations on the forward sides of the blades.

Medical And Pathological Information

The Kern County Coroner, Bakersfield, California, performed an autopsy of the pilot and determined that the cause of death was multiple blunt force trauma. The autopsy consisted of an external examination of the body, and the condition of the brain and heart were not described in the report.

The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on samples from the pilot and identified 0.014 gm/dl of ethanol in muscle tissue but no ethanol in brain tissue. In addition, amlodipine and pravastatin were identified in the liver, and amlodipine was identified in muscle. Ethanol is the intoxicant commonly found in beer, wine, and liquor. Ethanol may also be produced in body tissues by microbial activity after death. Amlodipine is a blood pressure medication, and pravastatin is a cholesterol lowering medication. These drugs are not generally considered impairing.

The pilot reported high cholesterol and treatment for this condition to the FAA beginning in 2002. In 2004, he reported to the FAA occasional premature ventricular contractions and provided an evaluation that included a cardiac catheterization, which revealed mild-to-moderate coronary artery disease with 40 to 50% stenosis in several arteries.

After an evaluation by the FAA, the pilot was placed on a special issuance medical certificate that required annual reviews. The reviews were generally positive until 2010, when a repeat catheterization demonstrated slight worsening of the area of stenosis in the right coronary artery to 50% to 60%. At his last medical examination, the pilot reported using the blood pressure medications doxazosin and hydrochlorothiazide and the cholesterol medication simvastatin. The most recent clinical reports received by the FAA in June of 2016 included a normal stress test, an echocardiogram that was abnormal but unchanged, and a cardiologist's report showing that the airman was doing well with no symptoms.  







NTSB Identification: WPR17FA091
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, April 27, 2017 in Keene, CA
Aircraft: NANCHANG CJ6A, registration: N192NG
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 27, 2017, about 1350 Pacific daylight time, a Nanchang CJ6A, N192NG, was destroyed when it impacted terrain near Keene, California. The private pilot, sole occupant of the airplane, was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to G&C CJ6 LLC, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed in the area at the time of the accident and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight. The cross-country flight originated from the Apple Valley Airport, Apple Valley (APV), California, about 1255, with an intended destination of Porterville, California.

Information provided by friends of the pilot, who were part of a four-airplane formation flight revealed that the flight originally departed from Phoenix, Arizona earlier in the morning, with a fuel stop at APV. Following lunch and a brief delay for weather, the flight of four departed APV, enroute to Porterville. As the flight neared Tehachapi, California, they were at an altitude of about 7,500 feet mean sea level (msl), maintaining separation from an overcast to broken cloud layer throughout the area. As they passed Tehachapi, the flight began a shallow descent. During the descent, the lead pilot lost sight of the accident pilot, who was positioned in the number two position (left of the lead pilot, in a diamond formation) and asked the accident pilot if he was ok. The accident pilot responded to the lead pilot that he was ok.

A short time later, the lead pilot asked the accident pilot a second time if he was ok, in which the pilot responded he was. Subsequently, the pilot who was in the slot position (in trail of the lead pilot) reported that the accident pilot was behind his position and lower, and eventually lost sight of him and maneuvered to reestablish visual contact unsuccessfully. The pilot who was flying in the number 3 position (right side of lead), reported shortly after that the pilot in the slot position lost sight of the accident pilot, he observed the accident pilot fly into a cloud layer while in a wings level, slightly nose low attitude, behind and lower than his position. The formation flight never reestablished radio or visual contact with the accident pilot.

A witness who was in a vehicle nearby the accident reported that they observed an airplane descend from a cloud layer in an almost vertical attitude until they lost sight of it behind a mountain.

Examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane impacted hilly terrain about 5.5 miles northwest of the Tehachapi Airport. The airplane came to rest in an almost vertical attitude on a heading of about 249 degrees magnetic. All of the major structural components of the airplane were located within about 100 feet of the main wreckage. The wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

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