Sunday, April 22, 2018

Beech A23A, N3680Q, privately owned and operated: Accident occurred January 16, 2016 near Riley Creek Airport (12TN), Kingston, Roane County, Tennessee

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Nashville, Tennessee

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N3680Q 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Kingston, TN
Accident Number: ERA16LA090
Date & Time: 01/16/2016, 1110 EST
Registration: N3680Q
Aircraft: BEECH A23
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fuel starvation
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 16, 2016, at 1110 central standard time, a Beech A23, N3680Q, was substantially damaged during a forced landing near the Riley Creek Airport (12TN), Kingston, Tennessee. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was privately owned and operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions were reported near the accident site about the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the 12TN at 1015.

According to the pilot, two weeks prior to the accident, he replaced the O-rings on the fuel caps and drained all of the fuel out of the left fuel tank in order to clear any debris from the left wing sump valve. He then poured all of the drained fuel into the right wing tank, which brought the right fuel quantity to approximately 28 gallons. He then poured the remaining fuel, which was approximately 1.5 gallons, into the left fuel tank and then sampled the fuel from both tanks for water and other contamination. He then tied down the airplane and placed a tarp over it.

On the day of the accident, the pilot returned to the airport and did not recall if he verified the fuel levels prior to his flight. He climbed into the cockpit and conducted a preflight inspection prior to starting the engine. Once the engine was started, he taxied around the ramp area to clean the mud and debris from the tires while warming up the engine. He took off and flew around for approximately 45 minutes before returning to the airport. After landing he taxied around the airport a few more times before departing again. He said that he was flying for about 10 minutes when he decided to return to the airport. As he flew over the airport to see the direction of the wind, the engine stopped. He attempted to troubleshoot the situation and made an unsuccessful attempt to restart the engine but did not move the fuel selector from the right fuel tank for the left fuel tank as he believed it only contained 1 to 1.5 gallons of fuel. The pilot performed an emergency off-field landing.

Initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplane's left wing was broken away from the wing root. The empennage separated from the main cabin and the firewall was buckled. During the examination of the airplane it was noted that the fuel tanks were not breached. Further inspection revealed that the fuel selector was on the right fuel tank. The right fuel tank did not contain any fuel. Examination of the left fuel tank reveal that it had approximately 7 gallons of fuel after draining. A cursory examination was conducted on the engine and valve train continuity was established. The magnetos were checked, and they produced spark to all the spark plugs. Fuel flow was confirmed to the fuel flow divider and fuel injectors. An engine run was attempted but was unsuccessful. During a telephone call with the FAA inspector, the pilot mentioned that he felt that the fuel may have been stolen out of his airplane prior to the accident. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 51, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/19/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/05/2015
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 115.2 hours (Total, all aircraft), 6.6 hours (Total, this make and model), 73.9 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 6.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5.2 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: BEECH
Registration: N3680Q
Model/Series: A23 A
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1967
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: M-1052
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/17/2015, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2385 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 5 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1482 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-346 SERIES
Registered Owner: Prameros Logistics International llc
Rated Power: 165 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Not Reported
Observation Facility, Elevation: MMI, 874 ft msl
Observation Time: 1515 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 3°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Unknown
Temperature/Dew Point: 4°C / 1°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 3100 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 280°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.9 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Kingston, TN (12TN)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Kingston, TN (12TN)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1015 EST
Type of Airspace: Class E 

Airport Information

Airport: Riley Creek (12TN)
Runway Surface Type: N/A
Airport Elevation: 750 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 35.823611, -84.538889 (est)

NTSB Identification: ERA16LA090 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, January 16, 2016 in Kingston, TN
Aircraft: BEECH A23, registration: N3680Q
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On January 16, 2016, at 1110 central standard time, a Beech A23, N3680Q, was substantially damaged by a collision with a tree during a forced landing near the Riley Creek Airport (12TN), Kingston, Tennessee. The private pilot was not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions were reported near the accident site about the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the 12TN at 1015.

According to the pilot, the day before the accident, he said that he drained the left fuel tank in order to clear any debris from the left wing sump valve. He said that he poured all of the drained fuel into the right wing tank which brought the quantity to approximately 28 gallons in the right tank. He poured approximately 1.5 gallons into the left fuel tank and then sumped both tanks for water and contamination. The following day when the pilot returned to the airport, conducted a pre-flight, started the engine, taxied around the ramp area to clean the mud and debris from the tires while warming up the engine. He took off and flew around the local area for approximately 45 minutes before returning to the airport. After landing he taxied around the airport a few more times before departing again. He said that he was flying for about 10 minutes when he decided to return to the airport. As he flew over the airport to see the direction of the wind, the engine stopped. An unsuccessful attempted was made to restart the engine, and the pilot performed an emergency off field landing.

Initial examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed that the airplanes left wing was broken away from the wing root. The empennage separated from the main cabin and the firewall was buckled. The airplane was recovered from the accident site and retained for further examination.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

On this fuel injected aircraft, the fuel pump delivers more fuel than is necessary. The excess fuel is routed to the left tank. Therefore, the right tank depletes more rapidly than engine fuel consumption would indicate. The fuel amounts found in the investigation are just what one would expect. The pilot thinks someone stole his fuel. Does he think the thief stole from the right tank and put it back in the left tank? How about reading the POH. Just a thought.