Monday, March 26, 2018

Mooney M20E, N213EJ: Fatal accident occurred March 26, 2018 at Marina Municipal Airport (KOAR), Monterey County, California



WATSONVILLE — Gordon Leroy Holley, better known as Lee Holley, whose comic strip “Ponytail” ran in 300 newspapers across the U.S. including the Register-Pajaronian, died March 26 when his small plane crashed at Marina Municipal Airport. He was 85. 

Holley’s family delayed confirming his death because his body was so badly burned that a DNA test was necessary to confirm his identity, a family member said.

Holley was born in Phoenix, Ariz., on April 20, 1932. He lived in Palm Springs and was visiting his daughter in Watsonville at the time of the crash.

He graduated from Watsonville High School in 1954, and based his internationally syndicated strip on his time there. In 1986, Holley was named in the first Watsonville High School Hall of Fame.

As an artist at Warner Brothers, Holley regularly contributed to the studio’s eight-minute shorts, which were made to run between matinee double features at theaters across the country. He also drew such notable characters as Bugs Bunny, Yosemite Sam and the Coyote and Roadrunner.

He also worked for “Dennis the Menace” creator Hank Ketcham.

Once he signed on to draw “Dennis,” Holley saw borderline stardom that brought him offers from several publications such as Playboy.

Even before he found his fame in the cartooning world, Holley painted murals on the walls of pool halls and stores in Watsonville.

During a four-year stint in Navy ordinance during the Korean War, Holley honed his skills drawing a character named Seaman Deuce for military publications. After he got out, he applied for work at Disney and was put on a waiting list. During the wait, he contacted Warner Brothers and was hired.

Holley worked on three Academy Award-winning shorts, including 1957’s “Birds Anonymous” and the medieval-themed “Knighty Knight Bugs.”

He met his future wife, Patricia, then a stewardess on Pan American Airlines, and moved to her hometown of London to be with her. 

Throughout his career, Holley wanted to start his own comic strip based on his time at Watsonville High School. In his free time, he drew a few panels and sent them out to groups he thought might be interested. In 1960, he got a telegram from King Features Syndicate asking him to call their headquarters collect.

“Ponytail” became an internationally syndicated strip. Set at “Watsonhill” High, it related the misadventures of a blue-eyed blonde and her friends on the California coast.

In 1990, he retired to play tennis, fly his small plane and drive his Porsche. 

Archive “Ponytail” strips continue to run in the Register-Pajaronian.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://register-pajaronian.com

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Jose, California
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Gordon L. Holley: http://registry.faa.gov/N213EJ

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Marina, CA
Accident Number: WPR18FA112
Date & Time: 03/26/2018, 1053 PDT
Registration: N213EJ
Aircraft: MOONEY M20E
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 26, 2018, about 1053 Pacific daylight time, a Mooney M20E, N213EJ, was destroyed when it impacted terrain shortly after takeoff from runway 29 at Marina Municipal Airport (OAR), Marina, California. The private pilot/owner received fatal injuries. The personal flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed.

The airplane was based at Watsonville Municipal Airport (WVI), Watsonville, California. According to WVI operations personnel, about 0954 on the morning of the accident, the pilot parked his car just outside the Airport Operations Office, and came into the office to request a fuel topoff in his airplane, which was in his hangar there. The Operations Supervisor noticed that the pilot's ability to walk had significantly deteriorated since he last saw the pilot a few months prior, but that the pilot appeared to be in good spirits. Shortly thereafter, the fuel truck pumped 25.4 gallons into the airplane. WVI surveillance cameras recorded the airplane taking runway 20 for departure at 1035:54 PDT. No radio communications to or from the airplane were recorded either at WVI or OAR, which is located about 15 miles south of WVI.

One witness at OAR, who was located approximately midfield, reported that he saw the airplane lift off, and that the landing gear immediately retracted after breaking ground. He and two other witnesses all reported that they observed the airplane begin an unusually steep climb in an unusually high airplane-nose-up attitude. The airplane then pitched over to an approximately level attitude, and then began to yaw to the left. As it did so, the nose and left wing dropped. At this point in the flight, the airplane entered, via the upper frame edge, the field of view of a surveillance camera that was mounted on a building near the southwest corner of the airport. The left wing was the first item to appear in the frame. At that point the airplane appeared to be on a heading of about 160°, with about a 15° nose down pitch attitude, and in a descending flight path. The airplane continued to yaw left, the pitch attitude continued to decrease, and the trajectory became increasingly steep. By the time the airplane was about 3 airplane lengths above the ground, the pitch attitude was nearly vertical nose down, the top of the airplane was facing the runway 11 threshold, and the trajectory was near vertical. The airplane struck the ground in a near-vertical nose down attitude, fell back onto its underside, and a fire began immediately. The impact site was located just southwest of the intersection of runway 29 and taxiway C, offset about 300 feet from the runway centerline. The vertical distance from the top of the image frame to the impact point was about 10 airplane lengths, or about 230 feet.

Initial examination of the wreckage revealed that the bulk of the cockpit and cabin, and their contents, were consumed by fire. The wings and the steel-frame fuselage structure exhibited substantial impact crush damage. The outboard wing sections and the empennage were not damaged by the fire. The landing gear was found in the retracted position. The wreckage was recovered to a secure facility for subsequent detailed examination.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with an instrument-airplane rating. Review of his logbook revealed that he had a total flight experience of about 2,650 hours. He ceased flying in mid 2014 due to a family illness, and resumed in August 2017. The logbook indicated that he had accrued about 22.6 hours since then, all of which were in the accident airplane. The first 7.1 of those hours were dual instruction with a certified flight instructor.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) information indicated that the airplane was manufactured in 1965, and was equipped with a Lycoming IO-360 series engine. The pilot purchased the airplane in 1990, and had kept it hangared at WVI since 1999. Maintenance records indicated that the most recent annual inspection was completed on September 22, 2017. As of that date, the airplane had a total time (TT) in service of about 3,517 hours, and the engine had a TT of about 792 hours.

The 1054 automated weather observation at Monterey Regional Airport (MRY), Monterey, California, located 7 miles southwest of OAR, included winds from 110° at 3 knots, visibility 10 miles, clear skies, temperature 6° C, dew point 4° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.16 inches of mercury. One pilot-witness at OAR reported that at the time of the accident, the winds were from about 260° to 270° at about 10 knots.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MOONEY
Registration: N213EJ
Model/Series: M20E NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MRY, 15 ft msl
Observation Time: 1054 PDT
Distance from Accident Site: 7 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 6°C / 4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 10 knots, 270°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Marina, CA (OAR)
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  36.675556, -121.756944 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov



MARINA — One person died after a Mooney M20E crashed into a field next to the runway at Marina Municipal Airport on Monday morning.

Marina Fire Chief Doug McCoun said the plane took off from the airport and then stalled after ascending at a high angle.

“It winged over and spiraled into the ground,” he said.

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The Marina Fire Department received a call of a plane crash about 10:55 a.m. When they arrived, the plane was on fire in the field.

The pilot was the only person onboard.

McCoun said the coroner will release the name of the pilot after proper notifications.

Firefighters continued to patrol the scene more than an hour after the fire was extinguished.

“There are metals on an airplane that burn hot,” McCoun said. “We’re trying not to disturb the aircraft, but still put the fire out.”

The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were notified of the crash, and McCoun said he expected those agencies to conduct their own investigation into the crash.

According to McCoun, it was a private plane and was not affiliated with Skydive Monterey Bay, which operates out of the airport.

The cause of the crash is currently unknown. The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.mercurynews.com




MARINA, Calif. - UPDATE 3/26/2018 4 p.m.:  One man is dead after a plane crash at the Marina Municipal Airport Monday morning. 

Just before 11 o’clock, reports came in about a plane that had crashed and was engulfed in flames.

“The first officer on scene confirmed there was one plane that had crashed and was fully involved when the officer arrived on scene,” said Commander Eddie Anderson with Marina Police.

Fire crews from Marina and Presidio of Monterey responded, along with police and paramedics.

The Federal Aviation Administration told KION one person was aboard the aircraft when it crashed. Authorities say the aircraft was a Mooney M20E and was based out of Watsonville.

“We do have a few witness accounts. As I understand it, the witnesses said the airplane was taking off from runway 29, which is right behind us, going this direction, got airborne. Some witnesses said it climbed at a pretty steep angle, and they’re reporting that it stalled and came down,” says Michael Huhn with the NTSB.

Investigators have not identified the pilot, but say he was a familiar face at the airport.

“It’s my understanding the plane actually landed here to get fuel and was leaving and something happened, we don’t know exactly what caused the plane to crash,” Anderson said.

That’s the job of the FAA and the National Safety Transportation Board. Investigators were at the scene taking pictures of the wreckage and speaking to witnesses on Monday afternoon. They say it could take up to a year before they can determine that caused the crash.

The Marina Municipal Airport is closed while the investigation continues.

ORIGINAL POST: One man is dead after his plane crashed on the runway of the Marina airport.

We are told he was the pilot, and the only person on the small plane. He was making a stop to fill up and was a regular at the airport. Officials do not believe he was from the area.

The airport is now closed while first responders, the NTSB and FAA investigate the incident.

The FAA tells us, "A single-engine Mooney M20E crashed under unknown circumstances while the pilot was taking off from Marina Municipal Airport around 10 a.m.The FAA and NTSB will investigate."

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.kion546.com



Marina >> One person died after a small personal aircraft crashed into a field next to the runway at Marina Municipal Airport on Monday morning.

Marina Fire Chief Doug McCoun said the plane took off from the airport and then stalled after ascending at a high angle.

“It winged over and spiraled into the ground,” he said.

The Marina Fire Department received a call of a plane crash at around 10:55 a.m. When they arrived, the plane was on fire in the field.

According to Ian Gregor, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane was a single-engine Mooney M20E. The pilot was the only person onboard.

McCoun said the coroner will release the name of the pilot after proper notifications.

Firefighters continued to patrol the scene more than an hour after the fire was extinguished.

“There are metals on an airplane that burn hot,” McCoun said. “We’re trying not to disturb the aircraft, but still put the fire out.”

The National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA were notified of the crash and McCoun said he expected those agencies to conduct their own investigation into the crash. The airport closed as officials investigated the crash.

According to McCoun, it was a private plane and was not affiliated with Skydive Monterey Bay, which operates out of the airport. He said the plane is based out of Watsonville.

The cause of the crash is currently unknown. The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the crash.

In 2014, a Mooney M20F single-engine plane landed on its belly at the Marina Municipal Airport after its landing gear collapsed with no injuries resulting from the landing. In 2001, a homemade airplane built and piloted by David Rominger, 70, of Marina, crashed in a strawberry field when the aircraft’s wings collapsed while approaching the Marina Municipal Airport, killing him.

Original article ➤  http://www.montereyherald.com



MARINA, Calif. —  A small plane crashed on a Marina airport runway and burst into flames Monday.

The single-engine Mooney M20E pilot was declared dead at the scene.

No passengers were in the plane when it crashed at 10 a.m.

The pilot's identity was not immediately released. Witnesses said the plane is based out of Watsonville.

Flight instructor David Stoik described the crash as horrific.

"Upon watching the angle of the aircraft in the air as it took off from the runway I knew there was going to be a crash," Stoik told KSBW.

"The airplane burst into flames instantaneously upon impact on the ground. I jumped into my vehicle from the West Hangar and went to the site of the accident. The airplane was burnt to the ground in less than three minutes," Stoik said.

Firefighters doused the blaze.

"It's just a tragedy all the way around," Stoik said.

FAA officials are investigating to determine what caused the deadly crash.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.ksbw.com

1 comment:

Chris Kilgus said...

Pitching up right after TO, could it be that the seat latch came undone and the seat slid back?