Friday, March 16, 2018

Cirrus SR20, registered to and operated by Aerosim Academy Inc instructional flight, N486DA and Cirrus SR22, N816CD, both operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91: Accident occurred March 16, 2018 at Palatka Municipal Airport (28J), Putnam County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando
Cirrus Aircraft; Duluth, Minnesota 
L3 Commercial Training Solutions; Sanford, Florida 

N486DA  Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


N486DA  Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms



Location: Palatka, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA109A
Date & Time: 03/16/2018, 1038 EDT
Registration: N486DA
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR20
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Midair collision
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On March 16, 2018, about 1038 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corp (Cirrus) SR22, N816CD, collided with a Cirrus SR20, N486DA (using call sign Connection 461), while both airplanes were on approach to land at Palatka Municipal – Lt. Kay Larkin Field (28J), Palatka, Florida. There were no injuries to the pilot of the SR22, or to the flight instructor and pilot undergoing instruction in the SR20. Both airplanes were substantially damaged. Both airplanes were being operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91; the SR20 was conducting an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for either flight. The SR22 flight originated about 0932 from Jacksonville Executive Airport at Craig (CRG), Jacksonville, Florida, while the SR20 flight originated about 0953 from the Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Orlando, Florida.

The pilot of the SR22 stated that after takeoff he proceeded to 28J, and with his radio tuned to the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF), he heard transmissions from 2 pilots. The transmissions from one pilot were clear, while the transmissions from the other was not. He continued monitoring the CTAF and flew towards 28J, asking how many aircraft were in the traffic pattern at 28J. The pilot whose transmissions were clear announced two, to which he announced he could not understand the transmissions from the other pilot. At that time he believed the flight instructor of the SR20 asked how do you hear me or words to that effect. He reported the transmission from that pilot was low and he had trouble discerning what was said. While he was trying to determine what was said an unknown pilot said, "I hear you." For safety concerns he flew about 26 nm to Northeast Florida Regional Airport (SGJ), where he performed two touch-and-go (T&G) landings, then, thinking it might be safe at 28J, proceeded there.

The pilot of the SR22 further reported making his initial radio call on the 28J CTAF when the flight was 11 to 12 miles away. The flight continued towards 28J and when he was 6 miles away, he made a position report on the 28J CTAF. At that time there were still the same two airplanes in the traffic pattern. The transmissions from one airplane were "crystal clear", and that pilot reported departing the airport traffic pattern. He flew over 28J at 2,000 ft msl, which he announced, and then turned onto downwind leg for runway 27, flying at 1,000 ft and 100 knots. He called downwind, midfield downwind, base, and final, but did not see the other airplane that was in the airport traffic pattern. He performed a touch-and-go landing on runway 27, then decided to do one more before returning to CRG.

The SR22 pilot made radio calls on the CTAF announcing crosswind, and midfield left downwind, maintaining about 1/4 mile abeam the runway on the downwind leg. When he was abeam the numbers on the downwind leg of the airport traffic pattern flying at 100 knots, he watched an airplane roll onto the runway, and once that airplane began the takeoff roll, he started slowing and added the first notch of flaps. He also heard another airplane announce they were on a 6-mile final for the runway. When the SR22 was 45° from the approach end of the runway, he turned onto base leg of the airport traffic pattern at about 900 ft maintaining 90 knots where he lowered another notch of flaps. He then turned onto final of the airport traffic pattern between 500 and 600 ft making radio calls for each of the legs, but he did not see the other airplane in the airport traffic pattern. He set up for landing maintaining 80 knots on final with full flaps extended, the landing and strobe lights on. When over the runway just about ready to begin to flare, he heard a "bang" sound and the nose came up. At that time he attributed the sound to be associated with a catastrophic engine failure. He did not have control over his airplane which veered to the right.

The flight instructor of the SR20 reported that when near 28J he heard runway 27 was in use. They continued to 28J and descended to 2,500 ft msl. When the flight was 10 miles from 28J, he made his first radio call announcing their position, and intention. The flight continued and he made another radio call when the flight was 7.5 miles from 28J. At the second radio call the pilot of one aircraft announced that he could not hear him well. He switched the radio to comm 2 and made another radio call. A pilot who was on the ground reported that he could hear them loud and clear. He then switched to comm 1 and the radios were working OK. Their flight continued towards 28J, and he announced on the 28J CTAF that they were coming from the south, and would be entering left downwind at a 45° for runway 27. They joined the left downwind for runway 27, and turned base and final making radio calls on the 28J CTAF for each leg of the airport traffic pattern. He announced they would be performing touch-and-go landings and would be remaining in the airport traffic pattern. The PUI completed two landings, and remained in the traffic pattern while the flight instructor announced on the 28J CTAF every call of the airport traffic pattern. While on the downwind leg for the third landing, they heard a pilot announce that they were on a 6-mile final for runway 27. That pilot announced that he was advise when he was near the lake. Because of an airplane that was on short final approach which they had in sight, he elected to have the PUI extend the downwind leg. When they were abeam the airplane that was on final, they turned onto the base leg, which he announced on the CTAF. The PUI then turned onto final, which he announced, and he also announced when the flight was on short final. At that time, he also announced that this would be their last landing, and they would be departing to the northeast. When the PUI was just about to flare, he heard an explosion. Their airplane drifted to the right and stopped.

The flight instructor of the SR20 further reported after coming to rest, he saw a propeller, secured the engine, and turned everything off, but he did not touch the radios, adding that he does not recall how the radios were configured. He believed he would have secured the electrical system before getting out of the airplane, and once out of it never returned to it. He estimated their flight was at 28J for about 20 minutes when the collision occurred.

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 29, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes 
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 07/30/2015
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 10/19/2017
Flight Time: 500 hours (Total, all aircraft), 139 hours (Total, this make and model), 440 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 180 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 65 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 27, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/10/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/21/2018
Flight Time:  71 hours (Total, all aircraft), 5 hours (Total, this make and model), 16 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 34 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 2 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N486DA
Model/Series: SR20 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2007
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 1831
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/04/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3000 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 8171 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-ES
Registered Owner: AEROSIM ACADEMY INC
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: AEROSIM ACADEMY INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

The four seat, low-wing Cirrus SR22 airplane, serial number 0150, was manufactured in 2002. It was equipped with a Garmin GMA 340 audio select panel and two Garmin GNS 430 transceivers. It was not equipped with traffic collision avoidance system (TCAS) or ADS-B. The pilot was not recording audio transmissions, but reported he was wearing a Bose headset and was communicating on the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) using the comm 1 radio.

The pilot of the SR22 reported that since becoming a co-owner of the airplane in September 2017, there had not been any work done to the airplane's radios.

The four-seat, low-wing Cirrus SR20 airplane, serial number 20-1831, was manufactured in 2007. It was equipped with a Garmin GMA 340 audio select panel and two Garmin GNS 430W transceivers. It was not equipped with traffic collision avoidance system (TCAS) or ADS-B. None of the occupants were recording audio transmissions. At the time of the collision, the strobes, navigation and landing lights were on.

According to the operator of the SR20, a review of the discrepancy sheets for the period December 1, 2017, through the last discrepancy dated March 14, 2018, revealed no radio-related discrepancies during in that period of time. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SGJ, 10 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1056 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 45°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 310°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 9°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Sanford, FL (SFB)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Palatka, FL (28J)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0953 EDT
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information

Airport: PALATKA MUNI - LT KAY LARKIN F (28J)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 47 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: 27
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Touch and Go; Traffic Pattern 

28J was a public use, non-towered airport owned by the city of Palatka, Florida. It was equipped with runways 09/27 and 17/35. The published common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) was 122.8 MHz, which was not recorded.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 29.658333, -81.683611 (est) 

Postaccident examination of the SR20 revealed the comm 1 antenna, which was mounted on the centerline of the roof, just behind the doors, was missing. That area sustained significant impact-related damage consistent with contact by the propeller from the SR22. The comm 1 and 2 antennas from the SR22 were not damaged.

Both airplanes were powered and the selected radio frequencies and audio select panel were documented. The SR20 comm 1 transceiver was tuned to 122.80 MHz and the comm 2 transceiver was tuned to 122.80 MHz. The comm 1 and 3 radio selector switches were selected to listen on the audio select panel, and comm 3 "MIC" was selected to transmit on the audio select panel. The SR22 comm 1 transceiver was tuned to 122.80MHz and the comm 2 transceiver was tuned to 119.62 MHz. The comm 1 was selected to listen on the audio select panel, and comm 1 "MIC" was selected to transmit on the audio select panel.

Ground testing of the radios installed in the SR20 revealed comm 1 radio was unreadable and comm 2 radio was readable. The positions of the radios were swapped and the previously readable comm 2 radio became unreadable while the comm 1 radio was readable. Detailed examination of both transceivers revealed that they were within the manufacturer's specifications. Functional checks of all comm and MIC audio inputs of the audio select panel revealed that they were also within the manufacturer's specifications.

Ground testing of the radios of the SR22 found both operational in transmit and receive mode. 

Additional Information

Review of Audio Recorded from Other Airports

Review of FAA certified audio recordings from the departure airports for both aircraft, and also SGJ for the SR22 revealed that with respect to the transmissions from the pilot of the SR22, the beginning of one transmission was not clearly enunciated, while several portions of transmissions from both pilots of the SR20 were difficult to discern and/or were poorly enunciated. There was no mention by any air traffic control facility for either flight about any issue with either airplane's radios.

Exemplar Audio Panel Configuration

Testing of an exemplar airplane operated by L3 Commercial Training Solutions revealed that with the audio select panel configured exactly like it had for the SR20 (MIC 3 selected to transmit), with any comm 1 or comm 2 selected to receive, neither radio would transmit when the push-to-talk switch was pressed. Testing also revealed that when electrical power was removed from the airplane, pushing of the buttons on the audio select panel would not change the setting when the audio select panel was powered up again.

Pilots' Postaccident Interactions

The pilot of the SR22 stated that postaccident, he and both pilots of the SR20 interacted, and during that interaction he relayed to the flight instructor that he never saw him and could not understand his calls. The flight instructor indicated, "I made this call, I made the call" referring to position reports on the CTAF. He asked the flight instructor if he heard him and his position report calls to which the flight instructor of the SR20 said yes. The flight instructor was asked why didn't he say something on the CTAF due to the traffic conflict, and his reply was, "I was just wondering why you were on top of us."

The flight instructor of the SR20 reported that after exiting the airplane, he and the pilot of the SR22 talked. During that conversation he was able to confirm that the SR22 pilot was the person who broadcast on the 28J CTAF that he could not hear the SR20's transmissions. He also indicated that after the SR22 pilot had said he could not hear them well, he never heard any more radio calls from him. The pilot of the SR22 indicated to the flight instructor of the SR20 that he never saw their airplane and asked him if he could hear his radio calls. He informed the SR22 pilot that he never heard his radio calls.

Arrival and Departure Time Estimates

Based on departure times, cruise speeds, and distances between departure airports, it is estimated that the SR22 arrived at 28J about 0947, departed about 0954, arrived at SGJ about 1009, departed there about 1017, and arrived at 28J about 1032. The SR20 arrived at 28J about 1017.

N816CD Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N816CD  Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N816CD

Location: Palatka, FL
Accident Number: ERA18LA109B
Date & Time: 03/16/2018, 1038 EDT
Registration: N816CD
Aircraft: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP SR22
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 16, 2018, about 1038 eastern daylight time, a Cirrus Design Corp SR22, N816CD, collided with a Cirrus Design Corp SR20, N486DA, while both airplanes were on approach to land at Palatka Municipal – Lt. Kay Larkin Field (28J), Palatka, Florida. There were no injuries to the pilot of the SR22, or to the flight instructor and pilot undergoing instruction in the SR20. Both airplanes were substantially damaged. Both airplanes were being operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91; the SR20 was conducting an instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time and no flight plan was filed for either flight. The SR22 flight originated from Craig Municipal Airport (CRG), Jacksonville, Florida, while the SR20 flight originated about 0930 from the Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB), Orlando, Florida.

The pilot of the SR22 stated that after takeoff he proceeded to 28J, but because of difficulty in hearing one pilot, he elected to fly to Northeast Florida Regional Airport, St. Augustine, where he performed several landings. He then proceeded to 28J where he overflew the airport at 2,000 ft. He entered the airport traffic pattern and performed two landings, then remained in the airport traffic pattern for another. He announced his position for crosswind, midfield downwind, base, and final for runway 27. He noticed one pilot could not be heard well on the radio, one airplane was rolling out on the runway, and another airplane was on a 6-mile final. During the landing flare, he saw his propeller strike something, but could not see the airplane that was directly beneath him.

The operator of the SR20 reported that neither the pilot nor the flight instructor were wearing vision restricting devices. The flight instructor stated that the flight proceeded to 28J were they announced their intention to enter the left downwind for runway 27. In response to their call, a pilot advised that he could not hear them well, so he switched the transceiver to Comm 2 and called again. A pilot who was holding short of runway 27 advised he could hear them loud and clear. They remained in the airport traffic pattern announcing every leg of the airport traffic pattern and executed two touch-and-go landings to runway 27. They remained in the airport traffic pattern for their last touch-and-go landing, again announcing every leg of the airport traffic pattern. Due to traffic on final approach to runway 27 they extended the downwind leg of the airport traffic pattern, then turned onto the base and final legs of the airport traffic pattern. While on final approach about to land, they felt a big explosion then came to rest in grass adjacent to the runway.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CIRRUS DESIGN CORP
Registration: N816CD
Model/Series: SR22 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: SGJ, 10 ft msl
Observation Time: 1056 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 25 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 9°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 12 knots, 310°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Jacksonville, FL (CRG)
Destination: Palatka, FL (28J)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  29.658333, -81.683611 (est)



PALATKA — A single-engine plane ended up atop another Friday morning at Palatka Municipal Airport, but no one was injured, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

The Federal Aviation Administration said a Cirrus SR22 aircraft landed on top of a Cirrus SR20 at 10:30 a.m. on Runway 27 at the small airport at 4015 Reid St.

“The SR20 landed on Runway 27 first and the SR22 then landed on top of the other aircraft,” the FAA statement said.

The SR22 was piloted by 40-year-old Robert Jack Daniel Meier of Jacksonville, according to the Highway Patrol report. No one else was in that plane. The other was piloted by 29-year-old Luis Andres Salvador Zamb of Deland with passenger Xiao Wang, 28, of Sanford.

Times-Union news partner First Coast News learned that former Jaguars tight end Kyle Brady is an owner of a business linked to one of the planes involved, but it was unclear which one.

This was the third aircraft incident in Putnam County in the past three weeks, and the second connected to the airport.

Two people suffered minor injuries March 6 after a single-engine plane apparently lost power and crashed into a backyard while approaching the airport, just a mile west of the crash site, according to the Highway Patrol.

Two men were killed Feb. 27 when their single-engine plane crashed in the St. Johns River near Fort Gates Ferry.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.staugustine.com






JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - No one was hurt when two planes collided on the tarmac Friday morning at the Palatka Municipal Airport, authorities said.

The collision occurred shortly before 11 a.m. at the airport on Reid Street.

According to the Florida Highway Patrol report, both planes were descending at the same time when the plane piloted by former Jaguar Robert Meier hit the top rear of the second aircraft. 

Putnam County Sheriff Homer "Gator" DeLoach said there were no injuries reported at the scene, but the collision did result in a fuel leak.

Former Jaguars tight end Kyle Brady, who owns a stake in one of the planes involved, said the Palatka airport does not have a control tower, meaning pilots communicate with one another over the radio and use their own senses to avoid crashes.

Cary Green, a pilot who frequently flies out of the airport, said it's always up to the pilots to know when it's safe to land or take off.

"We are talking to one another, but there isn't even a requirement at non-towered airports to have a radio," he said. "You can come in here and there are aircraft that don't have electrical systems, but operate in and out of this place. So you just have to watch for other aircraft."

Green did not wish to speculate about what happened, but said it can be difficult to see other aircraft when piloting a low-wing plane. "You just have to be aware of what you can't see," he said.

One of the planes involved is registered to a B & S Aviation Enterprises, an Atlantic Beach-based firm. It belongs to Brady and two co-owners, one of whom was piloting the aircraft at the time of the incident.

The other plane is registered to Aerosim Academy, a flight school in Sanford. Troopers identified the pilot of that plane as a 29-year-old Deland man and the passenger as a 28-year-old Sanford man.

Green said there tend to be a lot of training flights through the Palatka airport because access is easier without a tower.

"Traffic can vary quite a bit," he said. "On a typical day, it can be very quiet, but within an hour we can get quite a few training aircraft."

The collision is under investigation by the Federal Aviation Administration. The agency will determine who, if anyone was at fault, and what penalties might be meted out as a result.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.news4jax.com




According to the Florida Highway Patrol, two planes collided while on the ground at the Key Larkin Airport in Palatka.


Officials report no one was injured in the small collision.


First Coast News has discovered former Jaguars tight end Kyle Brady is an owner of a business linked to one of the planes. It is unknown who was piloting the planes at the time of the crash.


Crews are working to clean up a small fuel leak where several gallons of fuel was leaked onto the roadway. We're told the spill is considered contained.


Three total occupants were among the two planes. It is unknown what the two planes were doing at the time of the collision.


FAA Statement:


"An SR22 aircraft landed on top of an SR20 aircraft on Runway 27 at the Palatka Municipal Airport, Palatka, FL today


at 10:30 a.m. The SR20 landed on Runway 27 first and the SR22 then landed on top of the other aircraft. Local authorities report that there were no injuries. The FAA will investigate. The registration numbers for the SR22 aircraft is N816CD and the registration number for the SR20 aircraft is N486DA."


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.firstcoastnews.com 



A single-engine plane ended up atop another Friday morning at Palatka Municipal Airport, but no one was injured, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

The Federal Aviation Administration said a Cirrus SR22 aircraft landed on top of a Cirrus SR20 at 10:30 a.m. on Runway 27 at the small airport at 4015 Reid St.

“The SR20 landed on Runway 27 first and the SR22 then landed on top of the other aircraft,” the FAA statement said.

The SR22 was piloted by 40-year-old Robert Jack Daniel Meier of Jacksonville, according to the Highway Patrol report. No one else was in that plane. The other was piloted by 29-year-old Luis Andres Salvador Zamb of Deland with passenger Xiao Wang, 28, of Sanford.

Times-Union news partner First Coast News learned that former Jaguars tight end Kyle Brady is an owner of a business linked to one of the planes involved, but it was unclear which one.

This was the third aircraft incident in Putnam County in the past three weeks, and the second connected to the airport.

Two people suffered minor injuries March 6 after a single-engine plane apparently lost power and crashed into a backyard while approaching the airport, just a mile west of the crash site, according to the Highway Patrol.

Two men were killed Feb. 27 when their single-engine plane crashed in the St. Johns River near Fort Gates Ferry.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.jacksonville.com

























AIRCRAFT: 
2007 Cirrus SR20 N486DA, s/n: 1831
At the time of the incident, TTAF was 8170.9
The last Annual Inspection was accomplished on 11/11/17 at TTAF 7850.6. 

ENGINE: 
Continental IO-360-ES27B, Serial Number: 1031573                                  
The last Annual Inspection was accomplished on 11/11/17 at TTE 1606.7. 
At the time of the incident, TTE was 1927.0

PROPELLER: 
Hartzell PHC-J3YF-1RF, serial number FP5884B
The last Annual Inspection was accomplished on 11/11/17 at TTP 8810.2, PTSO 1606.7. 
At the time of the incident, TTP was 9130.5, PTSO 1927.

EQUIPMENT:                    
S-TEC Fifty Five X Auto Pilot
Garmin GTX 327 Transponder
ACK A-30 Altitude Encoder

The following items were retained for testing by the NTSB.  
They will be provided to the buyer when they are returned from the NTSB:
Garmin GMA 340 Audio Panel
Garmin GNS 430 NAV/COMM 1
Garmin GNS 430 NAV/COMM 2
           
DESCRIPTION OF ACCIDENT:
Just prior to landing, a Cirrus SR22 landed on top of N486DA, slicing through the fuselage with the propeller and forcing N486DA into the runway.

DESCRIPTION OF DAMAGES: 
The aircraft was substantially damaged.      

LOCATION OF AIRCRAFT:  
Flagler County Airport, Florida

REMARKS:   
Salvage is sold as is/where is.  
The three items in the possession of the NTSB will be provided to the buyer as soon as they are released.

Read more here:  http://www.avclaims.com/N486DA.html

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