Thursday, October 26, 2017

Williams T-51 Mustang, N151TA: Incident occurred October 25, 2017 at Sioux Gateway Airport (KSUX),Sioux City, Iowa -and- Accident occurred August 07, 2012 at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Winnebago County, Wisconsin

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Iowa

Aircraft on landing, went off the side of the runway and struck a light.

http://registry.faa.gov/N151TA

Date: 25-OCT-17
Time: 16:34:00Z
Regis#: N151TA
Aircraft Make: TITAN
Aircraft Model: T51 MUSTANG
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: SIOUX CITY
State: IOWA



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N151TA

NTSB Identification: CEN12LA530 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 07, 2012 in Oshkosh, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/27/2013
Aircraft: WILLIAMS JOHN T-51 MUSTANG, registration: N151TA
Injuries: 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Shortly after takeoff for a test flight, the pilot noticed that the airplane was not climbing as expected and the engine was slowly losing power. The coolant temperature was 225 degrees and the airplane was only 250 to 300 feet above ground level. During the return to the airport, the pilot heard and felt an explosion behind him and felt a burning sensation on his back. During the forced landing, the right main landing gear collapsed. Examination of the airplane revealed that a cooling line had separated from the radiator behind the pilot during the accident flight. The examination also revealed that the radiator hose line clamp for a different cooling hose was overtightened and not seated properly in its pipe bead. A replacement engine had been installed as a result of a blown head gasket during a previous flight; however, the cooling system was not replaced, and it could not be determined when the clamp was overtightened. An examination of the remaining systems revealed no anomalies.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:

The separation of an engine cooling hose from the radiator.

On August 7, 2012, about 1620 central daylight time a Williams T-51 Mustang airplane, N151TA, conducted a forced landing at the Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot was seriously injured and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a test flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight which operated without a visual flight rules flight plan. The local flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to the pilot, the purpose of the test flight was to trouble-shoot the lower engine power and higher than expected operating temperatures encountered during the previous test flight. After takeoff, the airplane was not performing as expected and the engine was slowly losing power. The pilot observed that the coolant temperature was 225 degrees and the airplane was only 250 to 300 feet above ground level. The pilot communicated with air traffic control that he wanted to return to the airport and started a turn. During the turn, the pilot heard and felt an explosion behind him and felt a burning sensation on his back. The pilot lost all forward visibility as the windscreen was black with smoke, but he was able to see a small amount out the left side of the windscreen.

The pilot stated that he continued to try and fly the airplane, though he was limited by the inability to see outside of the airplane and the pain associated with the burning sensation on the left side of his body. The pilot extended the landing gear and conducted a forced landing in the grass, just short of the general aviation ramp.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector who traveled to the accident scene, the right main landing gear collapsed during the forced landing. The airplane continued an additional 300 feet before coming to rest. The left wing and left flap were wrinkled during the forced landing.

The airplane was recovered and relocated to the owner’s hangar in Ohio for further examination. The FAA inspector who provided oversight for the examination reported that there were no negative properties or operational failures observed during the testing of the cooling system. The number four spark plug was severely damaged. According to the pilot, an examination of the engine revealed no further anomalies. The pilot added that a cooling hose separated from the radiator which was located behind him. The radiator and cooling lines had not been boxed in, which would isolate the cooling system from the cockpit.

Several days prior to the accident flight, the engine and cooling system operated at a higher than normal power setting and coolant temperature. After the flight, the coolant temperature reached the maximum range of 250 degrees Fahrenheit and coolant purged itself from the system. On a subsequent flight, the coolant temperature gauge did not function and shortly after takeoff the pilot observed smoke in the cockpit. As the pilot returned to the airport to land, he noticed that the engine oil temperature was high and the oil pressure was low. An examination revealed an oil leak between the cylinder head and the engine block. Following this flight, a replacement engine was installed; however, the cooling system was not replaced.


 NTSB Identification: CEN12LA530 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, August 07, 2012 in Oshkosh, WI
Aircraft: WILLIAMS JOHN T-51 MUSTANG, registration: N151TA
Injuries: 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed.

On August 7, 2012, approximately 1620 central daylight time a Williams T-51 Mustang, N151TA, was substantially damaged while landing at Wittman Regional Airport (KOSH), Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot was seriously injured. The flight was being conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 without a flight plan. The local flight has just departed KOSH and was landing when the accident occurred.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration inspector who traveled to the accident scene, shortly after takeoff steam and radiator coolant started entering the cockpit and burned the pilot. The pilot returned to the airport for a forced landing. During the landing the right main landing gear collapsed. The airplane continued an additional 300 feet before coming to rest short of the general aviation ramp. The left wing and left flap were wrinkled.

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