Sunday, August 20, 2017

Evolution Trikes Revo Rival, N2264X: Fatal accident occurred September 05, 2015 in Laconia, Belknap County, New Hampshire -and- Accident occurred April 20, 2014 at Concord Municipal Airport (KCON), Merrimack County, New Hampshire



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Portland, Maine

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


Aviation Accident Data Summary -   National Transportation Safety Board:   http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


http://registry.faa.gov/N2264X



NTSB Identification: ERA15LA339 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 05, 2015 in Laconia, NH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 06/29/2016
Aircraft: EVOLUTION AIRCRAFT INC REVO, registration: N2264X
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Review of GPS information revealed that the sport pilot/owner of the weight-shift-control aircraft completed one left circuit over a beach at a low altitude. During a second circuit, the aircraft was about 100 ft or less above the ground for several minutes before it descended and impacted the backyard of a residence. Examination of the wreckage, which included a successful test run of the engine, did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The sport pilot’s improper decision to operate the weight-shift-control aircraft at low altitude and his subsequent failure to maintain control of the aircraft, which resulted in a subsequent collision with terrain.




On September 5, 2015, about 1538 eastern daylight time, a special-light-sport, weight-shift-control Evolution Aircraft Revo, N2264X, was substantially damaged when it impacted the backyard of a residence, following a loss of control while circling a nearby beach at low altitude in Laconia, New Hampshire. The sport pilot was fatally injured. The aircraft was registered to and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Laconia Municipal Airport (LCI), Laconia, New Hampshire, about 1530.

Several witnesses reported that the aircraft circled very low over the beach and looked like it was going to land. It then banked sharply left and descended nose-down near a residence. Two of the witnesses reported a sputtering or loss of engine noise, while five witnesses reported continuous or an increase in engine noise.

The wreckage came to rest inverted. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. The pilot's four-point restraint system remained intact. The inspector noted that fuel remained in the two carburetor fuel bowls and in the single-fuel tank. He was able to rotate the propeller by hand, confirm valve train continuity and attain thumb compression on all cylinders.

Under the direction of the FAA inspector, a mechanic subsequently recovered the aircraft and was able to verify control continuity. Once he replaced a water pump that had sustained impact damage, he was able to successfully test-run the engine on the airframe.

Review of the sport pilot's logbook revealed that he had accumulated about 102 hours of flight experience; of which, 91 hours were in the same make and model as the accident aircraft. About 7 of the hours were flown during the 30-day period preceding the accident. Additionally, the sport pilot had recently ferried the accident aircraft from Florida to New Hampshire, but had not recorded that trip in his logbook. Review of the NTSB database revealed that the sport pilot was involved in a landing accident in the same make and model aircraft on April 20, 2014. The probable cause of that accident was his failure to maintain control during a go-around (ERA14CA203).

The two-seat, high-wing, fixed tricycle gear, weight-shift-control aircraft, serial number 000594, was manufactured in 2013 and issued a special-light-sport airworthiness certificate by the FAA. It was powered by a Rotax 912ULS, 100-horsepower engine, equipped with three-blade composite propeller. The aircraft logbooks were not recovered and no determination could be made regarding the aircraft's most recent inspection.

The aircraft was equipped with an electronic flight information system (EFIS), which was retained and forwarded to the NTSB Vehicle Recorder Laboratory, Washington, DC. Data were successfully downloaded from the EFIS and plotted. Although no engine data were recovered, a GPS plot of the accident flight was generated. Review of the plot revealed that the aircraft departed LCI at 1530, climbed to an altitude about 1,300 feet above ground level (agl), and flew west for about 1 minute. It then turned north and paralleled the shore of Lake Winnipesaukee, descended to about 300 feet agl, where it remained for the majority of the flight. The aircraft completed one left circuit near a beach uneventfully. During a second, wider left circuit, the aircraft descended to about 100 feet agl or less over the lake, where it remained until impacting the backyard of the residence approximately 2 minutes later.

The pilot succumbed to his injuries on September 6, 2015 and an autopsy was not performed; however, the New Hampshire Medical Examiner's report noted the cause of death as "Complications of Blunt Head Trauma." Toxicological testing was performed on the pilot by the FAA Bioaeronautical Science Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Review of the test results revealed:

"Etomidate detected in Blood
Metoprolol detected in Blood"

Etomidate was consistent with emergency treatment the pilot received in the hospital and Metoprolol was an antihypertensive that was not impairing.

The recorded weather at LCI, at 1535, included wind from 190 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 9 miles and clear sky.



NTSB Identification: ERA15LA339
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, September 05, 2015 in Laconia, NH
Aircraft: EVOLUTION AIRCRAFT INC REVO, registration: N2264X
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 5, 2015, about 1540 eastern daylight time, a special-light-sport, weight-shift-control Evolution Aircraft Revo, N2264X, was substantially damaged when it impacted the backyard of a residence, following a loss of control while circling a nearby beach at low altitude in Laconia, New Hampshire. The sport pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by a private individual as a personal flight conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight that departed Laconia Municipal Airport (LCI), Laconia, New Hampshire, about 1520.

Several witnesses reported that the aircraft circled very low over the beach and looked like it was going to land. It then banked sharply left and descended nose-down near a residence. Two of the witnesses reported a sputtering or loss of engine noise, while five witnesses reported good or an increase in engine noise.

The wreckage came to rest nose-down and upright. Examination of the wreckage by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed substantial damage to both wings and the fuselage. The inspector noted that fuel remained in the two carburetor fuel bowls and in the single-fuel tank. He was able to rotate the propeller by hand, confirm valve train continuity and attain thumb compression on all cylinders.

The recorded weather at LCI, at 1535, included wind from 190 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 9 miles and clear sky.

The engine and an electronic flight information system were retained for further examination.



Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA14CA203 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, April 20, 2014 in Concord, NH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/30/2014
Aircraft: EVOLUTION AIRCRAFT INC REVO, registration: N2264X
Injuries: 1 Minor.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

According to the student pilot he was returning from a local flight and had entered the pattern with the intent to land. After turning final the pilot noticed he was right of the runway centerline and attempted a left turn to realign the airplane with the runway. During the turn the pilot was forced to correct more due to a slight crosswind. When he finally centered the airplane it was aligned with the left side of the runway, 25 feet over the runway lighting and descending. The pilot then discontinued the landing and initiated a go around maneuver; however, the airplane "dropped 12-15 feet", impacted the ground and the nose gear collapsed before coming to rest on the runway. 

Postaccident examination of the airplane by the Federal Aviation Administration revealed substantial damage to both wings. The pilot reported no pre-impact mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that could have precluded normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The student pilot's failure to maintain control during a go around, which resulted in a collision with terrain.

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