Saturday, August 5, 2017

Vans RV-10, N100UK: Accident occurred October 07, 2016 in Ashwood, Virginia

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ERA17CA008
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 07, 2016 in Ashwood, VA
Probable Cause Approval Date: 08/22/2017
Aircraft: ALGIMANTAS JONUSAS RV-10, registration: N100UK
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The noninstrument-rated private pilot obtained weather information from an on-line flight planning website. Before departure, he also telephoned his destination airport and "determined the weather was all OK." He then took off and climbed to 5,500 ft mean sea level for the cruise portion of his flight. He advised that he also checked and monitored weather while en route but that the "fog and clouds came down really thick," so he decided to divert to the nearest airport. While flying toward his diversion airport, the visibility deteriorated and a "TERRAIN ALERT" warning illuminated on his GPS display. He attempted to pull up twice but impacted trees and terrain on the side of a mountain. The pilot and passenger were seriously injured during the impact, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions of the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation. Review of weather observations indicated that an extensive area of low clouds and a large area of marginal visual flight rules (MVFR) conditions existed over the pilot's planned route. Low instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions prevailed at the diversion airport and near the accident site with visibility less than 1/4 mile in heavy rain and overcast ceilings at 100 ft. The MVFR-to-IFR weather conditions had been forecast, and AIRMETs warning of IFR and mountain obscuration conditions had been issued.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The noninstrument-rated pilot's inadequate preflight and in-flight weather planning and continued flight into instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in impact with trees and terrain.

 



Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Richmond, Virginia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N100UK 






NTSB Identification: ERA17CA008
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 07, 2016 in Ashwood, VA
Aircraft: ALGIMANTAS JONUSAS RV-10, registration: N100UK
Injuries: 2 Serious.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.


The non-instrument rated private pilot obtained weather information from an online flight planning website. Prior to departure he also telephoned his destination airport and "determined the weather was all OK." He then took off and climbed to 5,500 feet above mean sea level for the cruise portion of his flight. He advised that he also checked and monitored weather while enroute, but the "fog and clouds came down really thick," so he decided to divert to the nearest airport. While flying towards his diversion airport, the visibility deteriorated and a "TERRAIN ALERT" warning illuminated on his GPS display. He attempted to pull up twice, but impacted trees and terrain on the side of a mountain. The pilot and passenger were seriously injured during the impact and the airplane was substantially damaged. The pilot reported that there were no preimpact mechanical failures or malfunctions of the airframe or engine that would have precluded normal operation.

Review of weather observations indicated an extensive area of low clouds, and a large area of marginal visual flight rules (MVFR) conditions existed over the pilot's planned route. Low instrument flight rules (IFR) conditions prevailed at the diversion airport and in the vicinity of the accident site, with visibility less than 1/4-mile in heavy rain and overcast ceilings at 100 ft. The MVFR to IFR weather conditions had been forecast, and AIRMETs warning of IFR and mountain obscuration conditions had been issued.

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