Sunday, June 11, 2017

Cessna TU206G Turbo Stationair, N4776U: Accident occurred October 26, 2014 in Monument, Grant County, Oregon

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Hillsboro, Oregon

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N4776U

NTSB Identification: WPR15LA022
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, October 26, 2014 in Monument, OR
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/19/2015
Aircraft: CESSNA TU206G, registration: N4776U
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot stated that, after a 15-minute flight, he landed the airplane on a familiar, gravel runway at a slow groundspeed. Immediately thereafter, the airplane began to veer right, and the pilot used the brakes and aileron inputs in an effort to return to the runway center. Despite the pilot’s attempts to regain directional control, the airplane continued off the right side of the runway, struck a ditch, and then came to rest inverted.

The pilot reported that the loss of directional control was precipitated by a landing gear malfunction and that a brake likely seized after touchdown. Although the brakes could not be operated with the pedals during postaccident examination of the braking system, it could not be determined whether this was a result of the accident and/or the subsequent recovery. 

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The loss of braking action during the landing roll on a gravel runway for reasons that could not be determined based on the available information. 

On October 26, 2014, about 0830 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna TU206G, N4776U, veered of the runway and collided with a ditch at a private airfield in Monument, Oregon. The pilot/owner was operating the airplane under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The commercial pilot, the sole occupant, was not injured; the airplane sustained substantial damage. The local personal flight departed from Monument Municipal Airport, Monument, Oregon about 0815 with a planned destination of the airfield that the accident occurred. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the pilot had not filed a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan.

The pilot stated that the airplane touched down on the gravel runway at a slow groundspeed; his farm was near the runway and he had landed there regularly. Immediately thereafter, the airplane began to veer to the right (north). The pilot used both the brakes and aileron inputs in an effort to return to the runway center. Despite the pilot's attempts to regain directional control, the airplane continued off the right side of the runway and collided into a ditch. The airplane came to rest inverted incurring damage to the wings and tail section.

The pilot further stated that the loss of directional control was precipitated by a landing gear malfunction. He opined that a brake likely seized after touchdown.

According to the recovery personnel, the left tire made a long track in the gravel angling to the right and then the track dropped off the edge of the runway after the airplane's right wing tip collided with a tree. Indications on the runway (skid marks in the crushed rock) indicated that the left brake was working, but there was no traction due to the looseness and depth of the gravel surface. The nose wheel rolled but still dug a trough, the right wheel only touched down a few times, appearing to have been in the air most of the time.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector looked at the disassembled airplane following the recovery and examined the brake system. He noted that they were both intact and both tires turned freely. He was not able to operate the brakes with the pedals, and it could not be determined if that was a result of the accident and/or subsequent recovery.

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