Thursday, April 20, 2017

Cessna 210 Centurion, N9589T: Accident occurred April 19, 2017 near Harriet Alexander Field Airport (ANK), Salida, Chaffee County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Denver, Colorado
Continental Motors; Mobile, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N9589T



Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board

Location: Salida, CO
Accident Number: CEN17LA162
Date & Time: 04/19/2017, 1910 MDT
Registration: N9589T
Aircraft: CESSNA 210
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 19, 2017, about 1910 mountain daylight time, an Cessna 210 airplane, N9589T, impacted a fence and irrigation equipment during an off airport forced landing while on a visual approach to the Harriet Alexander Field Airport (ANK), Salida, Colorado. The private pilot was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was being operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 business flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the airport at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Page Municipal Airport (PGA), Page, Arizona, about 1700.

The pilot was delivering the airplane to a new owner in Denver and was landing at ANK for fuel. She stated she flew the first hour and thirty minutes with the left fuel tank selected then she switched to the right fuel tank for the remainder of the flight. The en route portion of the flight was uneventful. She stated the fuel mixture was leaned during the flight and increased to full rich as she descended. She stated that she entered the ANK traffic pattern, turned onto base leg, and after leveling the wings, noticed "everything went quiet." She attempted to restart the engine with no success. Unable to make it to the runway, she chose a field in which to land. The airplane landed hard and contacted a fence and irrigation equipment during the landing roll resulting in substantial damage to the right wing.

The ANK airport manager who assisted in removing the airplane from the field reported they drained 14 to 15 gallons of fuel from the right wing and about 1 gallon of fuel from the left wing prior to moving the airplane.

An examination of the airframe and engine were conducted on May 5, 2017 at ANK. The upper engine cowling had been removed from the airplane. A visual inspection of the engine was conducted, and no impact damage was noted. The wings had been removed from the airplane during the wreckage retrieval. The airplane was moved from a hangar to an open ramp and secured.

An examination of the engine was conducted during which the top spark plugs were removed and appeared to have normal color and wear signatures. The cylinders were examined with a lighted boroscope. The cylinder valves were intact with normal combustion signatures. Thumb compression was achieved when the propeller was rotated by hand. Both magnetos produced spark at the ignition leads and the impulse couplers released normally. A temporary fuel supply was connected to the right-wing fuel supply port and a bucket was placed under the right tank fuel return port. The fuel inlet b-nut was removed from the fuel manifold and the boost pump was turned on. Fuel flow was verified at the fuel delivery hose. The fuel inlet hose was reinstalled on the fuel manifold. Cylinder No. 5 fuel line was removed from the injector. The fuel boost pump was turned on and fuel flow was verified through the line which was subsequently reinstalled.

The fuel system was primed, and an attempt was made to start the engine. This was performed twice and both times the engine did not start. The No.6 injector nozzle was removed, the boost pump turned on and it was verified that fuel was flowing to the injector nozzle. A third attempt to start the engine was successful and the engine was run at idle for several minutes to warm up. The throttle was then advanced, and the engine rpm responded accordingly. The fuel mixture was leaned to account for the high elevation. The rpm increased by 150 rpm and the engine began to run more smoothly. A magneto check was performed at 1,700 rpm and a 100-rpm drop was noted with each magneto. Engine power was increased, and the engine ran smoothly until the mixture was enriched at which time it began to run rough, although it continued to run. The engine power was then decreased to idle, the mixture control was moved to the cutoff position, and the engine stopped.

It was noted that the exhaust gas temperature gauge was inoperative, and the cylinder head temperature gauge indicated a single cylinder value. The fuel gauge operated normally. The manifold gauge indicated atmospheric pressure prior to the engine start but did not operate during the engine run.

The examination did not reveal any preimpact failures/malfunctions that would have precluded normal operation of the engine.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 34, Female
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/16/2013
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/06/2017
Flight Time: 264.4 hours (Total, all aircraft), 3.8 hours (Total, this make and model), 189.4 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 76.5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 16.9 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N9589T
Model/Series: 210
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1960
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 57389
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/10/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2900 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 10 Hours
Engines:  Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 4621.08 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: IO-470-E
Registered Owner: Robert P. Gray
Rated Power: 260 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: ANK, 7523 ft msl
Observation Time: 1915 MDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 60°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 14°C / -5°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 280°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Page, AZ (PGA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Salida, CO (ANK)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1700 MDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Harriet Alexander Field Airport (ANK)
Runway Surface Type:
Airport Elevation: 7523 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Unknown
Runway Used: N/A
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width:
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  38.545556, -106.033056

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA162
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, April 19, 2017 in Salida, CO
Aircraft: CESSNA 210, registration: N9589T
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On April 19, 2017, about 1918 mountain daylight time, an Cessna 210 airplane, N9589T, impacted a fence and irrigation equipment during an off airport forced landing while on approach to the Harriet Alexander Field Airport (ANK), Salida, Colorado. The private pilot was not injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was being operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 business flight. Visual meteorological conditions existed at the airport at the time of the accident, and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from Page Municipal Airport (PGA), Page, Arizona.

The pilot stated she was delivering the airplane to a new owner in Denver and was landing at ANK for fuel. While turning from base to final for runway 24, the engine lost power. The pilot made a forced landing in field where the airplane contacted a fence and irrigation equipment.
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A Cessna 210 Centurion aircraft force landed in a field at 8371 CR 160 in Salida Wednesday evening, causing damage to the plane and irrigation equipment but no injuries.

Chaffee County sheriff’s deputies responded to the incident shortly before 8 p.m.

Deputy Jesse Sanderlin said only the pilot was in the aircraft and was not injured in the crash, which Sanderlin said appeared to be due to engine failure. 

The plane came to rest in the field on its wheels, facing north near a broken fence and severely bent irrigation equipment.

The Federal Aviation Administration will come to the site today to investigate the crash, Sanderlin said.

The plane did not take off from the Salida airport prior to the crash, Sanderlin said.

Sanderlin said the sheriff’s office will release more information today.

The field at 8371 CR 160 is the location of the planned Longhorn Ranch subdivision, and the land is owned by Ron and Jo Jones, according to a public notice posted on the property.

According to Federal Aviation Administration records, the 1960 Cessna 210 Centurion is a fixed-wing, single-engine, 260-horsepower aircraft with four seats.

Robert P. Gray of Moab, Utah, owns the plane, according to Federal Aviation Administration records.

Text on the side of the plane reads “Skydive Canyonlands,” and the plane is shown in photos posted online by a Moab-based skydiving business with the same name.

Original article:   http://www.themountainmail.com

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