Sunday, March 12, 2017

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, N865MA and Cessna 172S Skyhawk 172, N269ME

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA191
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Saturday, March 11, 2017 in Kalaupapa, HI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/17/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 208, registration: N865MA
Injuries: 2 Minor, 7 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the commuter airplane reported that she was going to establish an approach and landing on runway 05 at an airport with a single runway and no taxiways. While on a 7-mile final, she communicated with the pilot of an airplane that was on short final for the same airport. The pilot that was on short final reported that he would report when he was clear of the runway, and he did. The commuter pilot acknowledged the other pilot’s clear-of-runway transmission and initiated the approach. 

As the pilot descended through 150 ft above ground level, she noticed that the airplane that she had communicated with was not clear of the runway. The airplane on the ground was near the runway 23 numbers with the propeller turning facing toward her landing airplane. She aborted the landing, but the airplane did not climb. The airplane impacted the runway hard and bounced. She reported that, when the airplane touched down after the bounce, she “applied left rudder pedal to steer the aircraft off the runway and out of the way of the other aircraft’s possible flight path.” The airplane exited the left side of the runway and ground-looped to the left. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right side of the fuselage and the right wing.  

After the groundloop, the pilot of the airplane near the runway 23 numbers attempted to take off. He was contacted via radio transmission by the airport manager and told that the runway was closed until further notice. 

Examination of the accident airplane by Federal Aviation Administration Aviation Safety Inspectors determined that there were no preimpact mechanical anomalies with the airplane that would have prevented normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s loss of directional control during the aborted landing, which she conducted due to another airplane, whose pilot had reported being clear of the runway, still being on the runway, and resulted in a hard landing and ground loop. 

The pilot of the commuter airplane reported that she was going to establish an approach and landing to runway 05 at an airport with a single runway and no taxiways. While on a seven-mile final, she communicated with the pilot of an airplane that was on short final for the same airport. The pilot that was on short final reported that he would report when he was clear of the runway, and he did. The commuter pilot acknowledged the other pilot's clear of runway transmission, and initiated the approach. 

As the pilot descended through 150 feet above ground level, she noticed that the airplane that she had communicated with was not clear of the runway. The airplane on the ground was near the runway 23 numbers with the propeller turning, facing toward her landing airplane. She aborted the landing but the airplane did not climb. The airplane impacted the runway hard and bounced. She reported that when the airplane touched down after the bounce, she "applied left rudder pedal to steer the aircraft off the runway and out of the way of the other aircraft's possible flight path." The airplane exited the left side of the runway and ground-looped to the left. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right side of the fuselage and the right wing. 

After the ground-loop, the pilot of the airplane near the runway 23 numbers attempted to takeoff. He was contacted via radio transmission by the airport manager and vehemently told that the runway was closed until further notice. 

Examination of the accident airplane by Federal Aviation Administration, Aviation Safety Inspectors, determined that there were no preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have prevented normal flight operation.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Honolulu, Hawaii

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Registered Owner:  Schuman Aviation Co Ltd.

Operator:  Schuman Aviation Co Ltd.

Operator Does Business As: Makana Kai Air


NTSB Identification: GAA17CA191
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Saturday, March 11, 2017 in Kalaupapa, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 208, registration: N865MA
Injuries: 2 Minor, 7 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot of the commuter airplane reported that she was going to establish an approach and landing to runway 05 at an airport with a single runway and no taxiways. While on a seven-mile final, she communicated with the pilot of an airplane that was on short final for the same airport. The pilot that was on short final reported that he would report when he was clear of the runway, and he did. The commuter pilot acknowledged the other pilot's clear of runway transmission, and initiated the approach.

As the pilot descended through 150 feet above ground level, she noticed that the airplane that she had communicated with was not clear of the runway. The airplane on the ground was near the runway 23 numbers with the propeller turning, facing toward her landing airplane. She aborted the landing but the airplane did not climb. The airplane impacted the runway hard and bounced. She reported that when the airplane touched down after the bounce, she "applied left rudder pedal to steer the aircraft off the runway and out of the way of the other aircraft's possible flight path." The airplane exited the left side of the runway and ground-looped to the left. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the right side of the fuselage and the right wing. 

After the ground-loop, the pilot of the airplane near the runway 23 numbers attempted to takeoff. He was contacted via radio transmission by the airport manager and vehemently told that the runway was closed until further notice. 

Examination of the accident airplane by Federal Aviation Administration, Aviation Safety Inspectors, determined that there were no preimpact mechanical anomalies that would have prevented normal flight operation.

NTSB Identification: OPS16IA009A
Incident occurred Friday, February 26, 2016 in Honolulu, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration:
Injuries: 10 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: OPS16IA009B
Incident occurred Friday, February 26, 2016 in Honolulu, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 208B, registration:
Injuries: 10 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On Friday, February 26, 2016 at 1548 Hawaii standard time (HST), a runway incursion occurred at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport, Honolulu, Hawaii, when a Cessna 208B, registration N865MA, over flew a Cessna 172, registration N269ME in line up and wait on runway 22L at the taxiway P intersection. The C208B was operating under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 and the C172 was operating under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and there were no injuries to passengers or crew of either aircraft.

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, Makani Kai Air, N865MA: Accident occurred March 11, 2017 at Kalaupapa Airport, Molokai, Hawaii 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Honolulu, Hawaii 

Schuman Aviation Company, Ltd: http://registry.faa.gov/N865MA

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA191
14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Saturday, March 11, 2017 in Kalaupapa, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 208, registration: N865MA

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Upon landing, aircraft appeared to brake hard.  Ground looped. Veered off runway.  Landing gear collapsed.    

Date: 11-MAR-17
Time: 19:01:00Z
Regis#: N865MA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 208
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: COMMUTER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 135
City: KALAUPAPA
State: HAWAII

Flight KDS800,  aircraft on landing, gear collapsed.

Date: 11-MAR-17
Time: 18:40:00Z
Regis#: N865MA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C208
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Operator: MAKANI KAI AIR
Flight Number: KDS800
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: KALAUPAPA
State: HAWAII




Federal investigators are looking into what caused a close call for a plane at Kalaupapa Airport on Molokai. 

The Makani Kai Air Cessna 208B Grand Caravan was arriving from Oahu around 8:30 Saturday morning.  The pilot, traveling with 9 passengers, called in about seven miles out after seeing another aircraft doing practice maneuvers.

“She announced her intention, ‘I’m going to land at Kalaupapa, are you clear of the runway’, and the other aircraft said yes, we are clear of the runway.” Said Richard Schuman, President of Makani Kai Air.  

Schuman said it turned out the other plane, carrying a student pilot and flight instructor, wasn't actually clear.

After maneuvering to avoid crashing into the other plane, Schuman said the pilot was forced to make the hard landing.

One witness, Keahi Hanakahi, was waiting for a friend on that flight.  He prepared for the worst after seeing the plane 'bounce a couple of times and then spin'.

“I saw the whole plane turn sideways, and I thought a gust of wind had taken it. I thought ‘Oh no, here we go. It’s going to be an accident.” Said Hanakahi.

He said the situation could have been much worse.

“They were a lot better off than you’d think.  The pilot was traumatized because she took responsibility for what happened, but it wasn’t her fault. Actually, she saved lives.” Said Hanakahi.   

After the close call, Schuman said the other plane tried to take off.  The student pilot and flight instructor stopped after running out of runway.  They then ran from the scene.

 “In this case we don't know what their intentions are because they’ve run away and to my knowledge nobody has talked to them yet.” Said Schuman.   All 9 passengers walked away safely from the incident.

Source:  http://www.kitv.com




KALAUPAPA, MOLOKAI (HAWAIINEWSNOW) -  Federal investigators are looking into what caused a mishap for a small plane on Molokai.


The president of Makani Kai Air said another pilot's mistake led to the hard landing for his company's Cessna 208B Grand Caravan on Saturday. The nine passengers and the pilot all escaped without any injuries.


The president of Makani Kai Air, Richard Schuman, said the flight from Oahu to Kalaupapa was on final approach around 8:30 a.m on Saturday. The pilot had received the all clear from another aircraft that was on the runway, according to him.


"So she said, 'You are clear of the runway?' and the other aircraft said, 'Yes.' Then she started to touch down and she noticed the airplane was on the runway coming towards her," Schuman said.


There is no air traffic controller at Kalaupapa's tiny airport so the pilots communicate with each other.


"It's a little different in regards to communication there, but all pilots in the vicinity or the airspace around that area have the capability of communicating with other pilots," said Amy Sakurada


Schuman said when his pilot made a last-minute maneuver to avoid the other aircraft, the wing of the Cessna 208 Caravan may have hit the runway. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane had its gear collapse after a hard landing and then went off the runway.


"There was an aircraft on the runway that wasn't supposed to be there. My airplane was trying to avoid it. Now we know what happened, we don't know why they were there. When you get a hold of those guys you'll find out," Schuman said.


According to Schuman, the instructor and student pilot on the other plane walked away after unsuccessfully trying to take off.


"After the accident, that plane came up to the site, turned around, tried to take off, the runway was too short so he stopped. The state workers are on the radio telling him you can't take off you almost caused an accident," he said.


FAA officials said they've heard that another plane was at the end of the runway, but it is undetermined at this time if it had an impact. 


Schuman said the plane is unable to fly due to damage to its wing, propeller and nose.


Story and video:  http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com




The Federal Aviation Administration reports that a plane made a hard landing at the Kalaupapa Airport on Molokai Saturday morning.

A Makani Kai Air flight from Honolulu was arriving when, at around 8:30 a.m., the front landing gear on the Cessna 208B Grand Caravan collapsed due to the hard impact of the landing.

The plane then went off the runway.

Nine people were on board, including a hospital patient, and no critical injuries were reported.

The state Dept. of Transportation reports that the plane was removed around 3 p.m.

The FAA did tell us that there was another plane on the runway at the time of the Makani Kai Air hard landing — a Cessna 172 — but couldn’t confirm if it was in any way involved.

“I seen the plane on the runway, the wheels were damaged,” said Shannon Kalani Aliiloa Crivello. “The park rangers were there already, escorting people off of the plane.

“As far as the patient, yeah, we helped the patient,” he said. “That was our main job, other than the staff took the patient in and the tourists and some of the visitors were fine.”

Because of the small size of the runway, no flights were able to leave or land in Kalaupapa. Its length is under 3,000 feet.

“It’s a two-direction runway,” said George Hanzawa of George’s Aviation. “You don’t have any error for crosswind landings. You have to make sure your runways are set properly and ready to go when you are coming in. You got to really think about it because there is no other crossing runway that you can use.”

As for the other Cessna that was in the area, a witness who wished to remain anonymous told us that that plane landed on the runway shortly before the Makani Kai aircraft hit the runway and lost control.

Hanzawa says when it comes to the runway at Kalaupapa, it’s up to the pilots to communicate when they are landing.

“There is no controller at Kalaupapa. The pilots are talking among themselves, on a discreet frequency, so they are in communication,” he said. “So when a pilot is approaching to land, they make their calls, letting them know what their intention is.”

Story and video:  http://khon2.com The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this incident. 

N269ME - Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

N865MA - Aviation Incident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

George's Aviation Services: http://registry.faa.gov/N269ME

Schuman Aviation Company, Ltd: http://registry.faa.gov/N865MA

NTSB Identification: OPS16IA009A
Incident occurred Friday, February 26, 2016 in Honolulu, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration:
Injuries: 10 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: OPS16IA009B
Incident occurred Friday, February 26, 2016 in Honolulu, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 208B, registration:
Injuries: 10 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators used data provided by various sources and may have traveled in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft incident report.

On Friday, February 26, 2016 at 1548 Hawaii standard time (HST), a runway incursion occurred at Daniel K. Inouye International Airport, Honolulu, Hawaii, when a Cessna 208B, registration N865MA, over flew a Cessna 172, registration N269ME in line up and wait on runway 22L at the taxiway P intersection. The C208B was operating under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135 and the C172 was operating under the provisions of 14 CFR Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and there were no injuries to passengers or crew of either aircraft.

Cessna 208B Grand Caravan, Makani Kai Air, N865MA: Accident occurred March 11, 2017 at Kalaupapa Airport, Molokai, Hawaii 

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Honolulu, Hawaii 

Schuman Aviation Company, Ltd: http://registry.faa.gov/N865MA

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA191
14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Saturday, March 11, 2017 in Kalaupapa, HI
Aircraft: CESSNA 208, registration: N865MA


NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Upon landing, aircraft appeared to brake hard.  Ground looped. Veered off runway.  Landing gear collapsed.    

Date: 11-MAR-17
Time: 19:01:00Z
Regis#: N865MA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 208
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: COMMUTER
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 135
City: KALAUPAPA
State: HAWAII

Flight KDS800,  aircraft on landing, gear collapsed.

Date: 11-MAR-17
Time: 18:40:00Z
Regis#: N865MA
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: C208
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Operator: MAKANI KAI AIR
Flight Number: KDS800
Activity: ON DEMAND
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: KALAUPAPA
State: HAWAII




Federal investigators are looking into what caused a close call for a plane at Kalaupapa Airport on Molokai. 

The Makani Kai Air Cessna 208B Grand Caravan was arriving from Oahu around 8:30 Saturday morning.  The pilot, traveling with 9 passengers, called in about seven miles out after seeing another aircraft doing practice maneuvers.

“She announced her intention, ‘I’m going to land at Kalaupapa, are you clear of the runway’, and the other aircraft said yes, we are clear of the runway.” Said Richard Schuman, President of Makani Kai Air.  

Schuman said it turned out the other plane, carrying a student pilot and flight instructor, wasn't actually clear.

After maneuvering to avoid crashing into the other plane, Schuman said the pilot was forced to make the hard landing.

One witness, Keahi Hanakahi, was waiting for a friend on that flight.  He prepared for the worst after seeing the plane 'bounce a couple of times and then spin'.

“I saw the whole plane turn sideways, and I thought a gust of wind had taken it. I thought ‘Oh no, here we go. It’s going to be an accident.” Said Hanakahi.

He said the situation could have been much worse.

“They were a lot better off than you’d think.  The pilot was traumatized because she took responsibility for what happened, but it wasn’t her fault. Actually, she saved lives.” Said Hanakahi.   

After the close call, Schuman said the other plane tried to take off.  The student pilot and flight instructor stopped after running out of runway.  They then ran from the scene.

 “In this case we don't know what their intentions are because they’ve run away and to my knowledge nobody has talked to them yet.” Said Schuman.   All 9 passengers walked away safely from the incident.

Source:  http://www.kitv.com




KALAUPAPA, MOLOKAI (HAWAIINEWSNOW) -  Federal investigators are looking into what caused a mishap for a small plane on Molokai.


The president of Makani Kai Air said another pilot's mistake led to the hard landing for his company's Cessna 208B Grand Caravan on Saturday. The nine passengers and the pilot all escaped without any injuries.


The president of Makani Kai Air, Richard Schuman, said the flight from Oahu to Kalaupapa was on final approach around 8:30 a.m on Saturday. The pilot had received the all clear from another aircraft that was on the runway, according to him.


"So she said, 'You are clear of the runway?' and the other aircraft said, 'Yes.' Then she started to touch down and she noticed the airplane was on the runway coming towards her," Schuman said.


There is no air traffic controller at Kalaupapa's tiny airport so the pilots communicate with each other.


"It's a little different in regards to communication there, but all pilots in the vicinity or the airspace around that area have the capability of communicating with other pilots," said Amy Sakurada


Schuman said when his pilot made a last-minute maneuver to avoid the other aircraft, the wing of the Cessna 208 Caravan may have hit the runway. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane had its gear collapse after a hard landing and then went off the runway.


"There was an aircraft on the runway that wasn't supposed to be there. My airplane was trying to avoid it. Now we know what happened, we don't know why they were there. When you get a hold of those guys you'll find out," Schuman said.


According to Schuman, the instructor and student pilot on the other plane walked away after unsuccessfully trying to take off.


"After the accident, that plane came up to the site, turned around, tried to take off, the runway was too short so he stopped. The state workers are on the radio telling him you can't take off you almost caused an accident," he said.


FAA officials said they've heard that another plane was at the end of the runway, but it is undetermined at this time if it had an impact. 


Schuman said the plane is unable to fly due to damage to its wing, propeller and nose.


Story and video:  http://www.hawaiinewsnow.com




The Federal Aviation Administration reports that a plane made a hard landing at the Kalaupapa Airport on Molokai Saturday morning.

A Makani Kai Air flight from Honolulu was arriving when, at around 8:30 a.m., the front landing gear on the Cessna 208B Grand Caravan collapsed due to the hard impact of the landing.

The plane then went off the runway.

Nine people were on board, including a hospital patient, and no critical injuries were reported.

The state Dept. of Transportation reports that the plane was removed around 3 p.m.

The FAA did tell us that there was another plane on the runway at the time of the Makani Kai Air hard landing — a Cessna 172 — but couldn’t confirm if it was in any way involved.

“I seen the plane on the runway, the wheels were damaged,” said Shannon Kalani Aliiloa Crivello. “The park rangers were there already, escorting people off of the plane.

“As far as the patient, yeah, we helped the patient,” he said. “That was our main job, other than the staff took the patient in and the tourists and some of the visitors were fine.”

Because of the small size of the runway, no flights were able to leave or land in Kalaupapa. Its length is under 3,000 feet.

“It’s a two-direction runway,” said George Hanzawa of George’s Aviation. “You don’t have any error for crosswind landings. You have to make sure your runways are set properly and ready to go when you are coming in. You got to really think about it because there is no other crossing runway that you can use.”

As for the other Cessna that was in the area, a witness who wished to remain anonymous told us that that plane landed on the runway shortly before the Makani Kai aircraft hit the runway and lost control.

Hanzawa says when it comes to the runway at Kalaupapa, it’s up to the pilots to communicate when they are landing.

“There is no controller at Kalaupapa. The pilots are talking among themselves, on a discreet frequency, so they are in communication,” he said. “So when a pilot is approaching to land, they make their calls, letting them know what their intention is.”

Story and video:  http://khon2.com

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