Friday, November 10, 2017

Cessna 180 Skywagon, N6547A: Accident occurred November 10, 2017 at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport (KECP), Panama City, Bay County, Florida

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Vestavia Hills, Alabama

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N6547A 



Location: Panama City, FL
Accident Number: GAA18CA039
Date & Time: 11/10/2017, 1105 CST
Registration: N6547A
Aircraft: CESSNA 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during the landing roll in gusting crosswind conditions, the right wing "suddenly" lifted and he applied right aileron to correct. He added that the control application did not correct the raised right wing and the left wing dragged on the runway, which resulted in the airplane coming to rest nosed over. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and vertical stabilizer.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported in the National Transportation Safety Board Form 6120.1 Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report that the wind was from 020° at 6 knots, gusting 17 knots. He added that the landing was on runway 34.

An automated weather observation station at the airport, about the time of the accident, reported the wind from 010° at 13 knots, gusting 17 knots. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's failure to maintain lateral/bank control during landing in gusting crosswind conditions.

Findings

Aircraft
Lateral/bank control - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Crosswind - Effect on operation
Gusts - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Other weather encounter

Landing-landing roll
Loss of control on ground (Defining event)
Dragged wing/rotor/float/other
Nose over/nose down

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/21/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/07/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 388 hours (Total, all aircraft), 261 hours (Total, this make and model), 388 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 49 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N6547A
Model/Series: 180 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1956
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 32444
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/09/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:  2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  3188.1 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470-R15B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KECP, 68 ft msl
Observation Time: 1713 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 11°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots/ 17 knots, 10°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SEVIERVILLE, TN (GKT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Panama City, FL (ECP)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 0916 EST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: NORTHWEST FLORIDA BEACHES INTL (ECP)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 68 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10000 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  30.358333, -85.795556 (est)

Preventing Similar Accidents

Stay Centered: Preventing Loss of Control During Landing

Loss of control during landing is one of the leading causes of general aviation accidents and is often attributed to operational issues. Although most loss of control during landing accidents do not result in serious injuries, they typically require extensive airplane repairs and may involve potential damage to nearby objects such as fences, signs, and lighting.

Often, wind plays a role in these accidents. Landing in a crosswind presents challenges for pilots of all experience levels. Other wind conditions, such as gusting wind, tailwind, variable wind, or wind shifts, can also interfere with pilots’ abilities to land the airplane and maintain directional control.

What can pilots do?

Evaluate your mental and physical fitness before each flight using the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA) “I'M SAFE Checklist." Being emotionally and physically ready will help you stay alert and potentially avoid common and preventable loss of control during landing accidents.

Check wind conditions and forecasts often. Take time during every approach briefing to fully understand the wind conditions. Use simple rules of thumb to help (for example, if the wind direction is 30 degrees off the runway heading, the crosswind component will be half of the total wind velocity).

Know your limitations and those of the airplane you are flying. Stay current and practice landings on different runways and during various wind conditions. If possible, practice with a flight instructor on board who can provide useful feedback and techniques for maintaining and improving your landing procedures.

Prepare early to perform a go around if the approach is not stabilized and does not go as planned or if you do not feel comfortable with the landing. Once you are airborne and stable again, you can decide to attempt to land again, reassess your landing runway, or land at an alternate airport. Incorporate go-around procedures into your recurrent training.

During landing, stay aligned with the centerline. Any misalignment reduces the time available to react if an unexpected event such as a wind gust or a tire blowout occurs.

Do not allow the airplane to touch down in a drift or in a crab. For airplanes with tricycle landing gear, do not allow the nosewheel to touch down first.

Maintain positive control of the airplane throughout the landing and be alert for directional control difficulties immediately upon and after touchdown. A loss of directional control can lead to a nose-over or ground loop, which can cause the airplane to tip or lean enough for the wing tip to contact the ground.

Stay mentally focused throughout the landing roll and taxi. During landing, avoid distractions, such as conversations with passengers or setting radio frequencies.

Interested in More Information?

The FAA’s “Airplane Flying Handbook” (FAA-H-8083-3B), chapter 8, “Approaches and Landings,” provides guidance about how to conduct crosswind approaches and landings and discusses maximum safe crosswind velocities. The handbook can be accessed from the FAA’s website (www.faa.gov).

The FAA Safety Team (FAASTeam) provides access to online training courses, seminars, and webinars as part of the FAA’s “WINGS—Pilot Proficiency Program.” This program includes targeted flight training designed to help pilots develop the knowledge and skills needed to achieve flight proficiency and to assess and mitigate the risks associated with the most common causes of accidents, including loss of directional control. The courses listed below can be accessed from the FAASTeam website (www.faasafety.gov).

Avoiding Loss of Control
Maneuvering: Approach and Landing
Normal Approach and Landing
Takeoffs, Landings, and Aircraft Control

The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association Air Safety Institute offers several interactive courses, presentations, publications, and other safety resources that can be accessed from its website (www.aopa.org/asf/).

The NTSB’s Aviation Information Resources web page, www.ntsb.gov/air, provides convenient access to NTSB aviation safety products.

The NTSB presents this information to prevent recurrence of similar accidents. Note that this should not be considered guidance from the regulator, nor does this supersede existing FAA Regulations (FARs). Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Vestavia Hills, Alabama 

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N6547A 

Location: Panama City, FL
Accident Number: GAA18CA039
Date & Time: 11/10/2017, 1105 CST
Registration: N6547A
Aircraft: CESSNA 180
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control on ground
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the tailwheel-equipped airplane reported that, during the landing roll in gusting crosswind conditions, the right wing "suddenly" lifted and he applied right aileron to correct. He added that the control application did not correct the raised right wing and the left wing dragged on the runway, which resulted in the airplane coming to rest nosed over. 

The airplane sustained substantial damage to the left wing and vertical stabilizer.

The pilot reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

The pilot reported in the National Transportation Safety Board Form 6120.1 Pilot/Operator Aircraft Accident/Incident Report that the wind was from 020° at 6 knots, gusting 17 knots. He added that the landing was on runway 34.

An automated weather observation station at the airport, about the time of the accident, reported the wind from 010° at 13 knots, gusting 17 knots. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 48, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/21/2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 02/07/2016
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 388 hours (Total, all aircraft), 261 hours (Total, this make and model), 388 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 49 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 11 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N6547A
Model/Series: 180 UNDESIGNATED
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1956
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 32444
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 03/09/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.:  2950 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines:  1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time:  3188.1 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: CONT MOTOR
ELT: C91A installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470-R15B
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 230 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KECP, 68 ft msl
Observation Time: 1713 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 20°C / 11°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 13 knots/ 17 knots, 10°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.16 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: SEVIERVILLE, TN (GKT)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Panama City, FL (ECP)
Type of Clearance: VFR Flight Following
Departure Time: 0916 EST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: NORTHWEST FLORIDA BEACHES INTL (ECP)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 68 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 34
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10000 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None

Latitude, Longitude:  30.358333, -85.795556 (est)



PANAMA CITY, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) - A few tense moments at a local airport Friday after a crash landing caused some commotion.

"I was sitting out in the truck trying to make something for my partner and a plane flew in," witness Jacob Castille said.

While working on a new plane hanger Friday morning at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport, Castille said he saw something unusual.

"I guess the wind caught the tail [of the plane] and it just flipped over onto the front," Castille said.

What he saw was a Cessna 185 plane crash landing on the airport's runway.

"Well, we had a little incident involving a small aircraft on landing. We've got a little bit of gusty wind and the plane had a little trouble navigating the wind on touchdown," Deputy Executive Director of Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport Richard McConnell said.

According to airport officials, a side wind on the runway caused the pilot to have a difficult time sticking his landing.

"It's a tail dragger and it is... sometimes they get a little difficult to navigate when you're in the wind," McConnel explained.

"I've never seen that before so it was kind of something new," Castille said. "It was scary."

Witnesses said the crash was not like one would expect.

"It happened really slow actually, surprisingly for as fast as a plane would go. It really flipped over kinda slow," Castille described. 'You didn't really hear that much like it wasn't really that loud. It was actually kinda quiet. I mainly just looked over and just happened to catch a glimpse of a white airplane just flipping over."

"It's something that's not overly common, but it is something we prepare for and you can see the staff, the fire department, were very capable, very ready to respond," McConnell said.

Airport officials said the only passenger, the pilot, was not injured in the crash.


They have since cleared the runway and it is back up and running.

Story and video ➤ http://www.wjhg.com





PANAMA CITY – The main runway at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport was closed for nearly two hours late Friday morning after a Cessna 185 plane had an “incident” upon landing and flipped over on the runway.


The pilot was not injured, said Airport Executive Director Parker McClellan.


The incident occurred shortly after 11 a.m. A crane had to be brought in to flip the plane over and clear the runway, which was opened back up at about 1 p.m.


Delta flight 1733 from Atlanta that was scheduled to land while the cleanup was going on and had to be diverted to Tallahassee for a landing.


McClellan said the airport had to call a wrecker company to flip over the plane.


“That is part of our emergency response,” he said, noting that the airport had to get FAA clearance to remove the plane from the runway.


McClellan said he did not have the pilot’s name readily available.


“I was told it was not a local airplane,” McClellan said.


The pilot’s wife was waiting in the Sheltair Aviation hangar for private pilots.


She didn’t want to talk about the incident.


“We are private people,” she said.


Original article ➤ http://www.newsherald.com






Panama City Beach, Fla. - A plane crash temporarily shut down the runway at Northwest Florida Beaches International Airport Friday.


The Cessna 185 flipped over and was upside down. A wrecker crew was on scene at 12:30 p.m. trying to remove the plane from the runway. 


It's unclear if anyone was injured in the crash. Airport officials are expected to release more information about the incident this afternoon.  


Original article ➤ http://www.mypanhandle.com

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