Friday, September 29, 2017

Piper PA-18-150 Super Cub, N3797Z: Accident occurred September 25, 2017 in Beluga, Alaska -and- Accident occurred November 14, 2009

http://registry.faa.gov/N3797Z

NTSB Identification: GAA17CA569
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, September 25, 2017 in Beluga, AK
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18, registration: N3797Z

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft flipped over after landing.

Date: 25-SEP-17
Time: 22:00:00Z
Regis#: N3797Z
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA18
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: BELUGA LAKE
State: ALASKA

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: ANC10CA008
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, November 14, 2009 in Anchorage, AK
Probable Cause Approval Date: 03/23/2010
Aircraft: PIPER PA-18-150, registration: N3797Z
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators used data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator and did not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was taking off in a tundra tire-equipped airplane from a snow-covered off-airport site, on a Title 14, CFR Part 91 personal flight. He reported that during the takeoff roll the main wheels struck a snowdrift, and the airplane nosed over, resulting in substantial damage to the wings and wing lift struts. The pilot said there were no preaccident mechanical problems with the airplane, and noted in his report to the NTSB that he should not have landed at the off-airport site with a wheel-equipped airplane. The pilot reported that after the accident he manually activated the airplane’s 406 MHz Emergency Locator Transmitter (ELT), and within 20 minutes of doing so, he received a cell phone call from the airplane’s owner inquiring about the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's decision to land and attempt to takeoff from an unsuitable off-airport site.

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