Monday, July 31, 2017

Cessna 172S Skyhawk, N957TA, S & G Sky LLC: Accident occurred July 31, 2017 near Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (KSEA), King County, Washington.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Renton, Washington

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

S & G Sky LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N957TA 

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA176
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, July 31, 2017 in Seattle, WA
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N957TA
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 31, 2017, about 1300 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 172S, N957TA, was substantially damaged following a ditching about 5 nautical miles northwest of the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (SEA), Seattle, Washington. The airplane was registered to S & G Sky LLC and operated by the pilot as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. The certified flight instructor (CFI)and the student receiving instruction were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and a flight plan was not filed. The local flight departed the Boeing Field/King County International Airport (BFI), Seattle, Washington, about 1300.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge, the CFI reported that upon completion of air work with the student and while returning to BFI, he observed a drop in oil pressure, followed by a partial loss of engine power, and eventually a total power failure. With insufficient altitude to make it to BFI, the CFI elected to ditch the airplane in the Puget Sound, about 50 yards from the nearest shoreline. Both the CFI and student egressed the airplane and swam to shore. Except for the top of the rudder and vertical stabilizer, the airplane came to rest upright and submerged in shallow waters.

The airplane was recovered from the accident site to a secured location for further examination.



SEATTLE - A crane and barge removed a small plane that landed in the water off West Seattle on Monday.

The barge quickly took the plane away.

The plane was on an instructional flight at the time of the water landing, investigators said.

Tom Little, senior accident investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board, said the Cessna 172 four-seater was being used for an instructional flight from Boeing Field through the Galvin Flying program. It was en route back to Boeing Field when it crashed.

Both occupants of the plane - the pilot and student - were able to escape without injury. Little said he hadn't yet established which of them was piloting at the time of the crash landing. Their names were not released.

The cause of the crash was a "loss of power," Little said - but he said investigators haven't determined how or why it lost power.

The small plane crashed offshore near the 6000 block of Beach Drive Southwest in West Seattle.

Aerial footage from the scene captured by KOMO's Air 4 showed the plane submerged in shallow water not far from shore with the tip of its tail protruding above the surface of the water. Officials said the aircraft sustained significant damage in the crash.

The Coast Guard, Seattle Fire Department and Seattle police responded to the scene.


Story and photo gallery:  http://komonews.com

SEATTLE - A small plane that made an emergency crash landing Monday in the waters off West Seattle was on an instructional flight at the time, investigators said.

Tom Little, senior accident investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board, said the Cessna 172 four-seater was being used for an instructional flight from Boeing Field through the Galvin Flying program. It was en route back to Boeing Field when it crashed.

Both occupants of the plane - the pilot and student - were able to escape without injury. Little said he hadn't yet established which of them was piloting at the time of the crash landing. Their names were not released.

The cause of the crash was a "loss of power," Little said - but he said investigators have not determined how or why it lost power.

The small plane crashed offshore near the 6000 block of Beach Drive Southwest in West Seattle.

Aerial footage from the scene captured by KOMO's Air 4 showed the plane submerged in shallow water not far from shore with the tip of its tail protruding above the surface of the water. Officials said the aircraft sustained significant damage in the crash.

The Coast Guard, Seattle Fire Department and Seattle police responded to the scene.

Plans call for bringing in a barge with a crane to lift the plane from the water on Tuesday or Wednesday.


http://komonews.com













SEATTLE - A small plane crashed Monday in Puget Sound off West Seattle, and the occupants were able to escape without injury.

Seattle police said the aircraft crashed offshore near the 6000 block of Beach Drive Southwest in West Seattle.

The occupants, two men, were able to make it safely to shore. No other information was immediately available about the two.

Aerial footage from the scene captured by KOMO's Air 4 showed the plane in shallow water not far from shore with the tip of its tail protruding above the surface of the water.

The Coast Guard, Seattle Fire Department and Seattle police responded to the scene. Emergency crews planned to check the aircraft to make certain no one else was aboard at the time of the crash.

The Seattle-Bremerton ferry Kaleetan was briefly called in to assist after the plane landed, but has since returned to its normal route and is running about 30 minutes late.

The Federal Aviation Administration identified the plane as a Cessna 172. The aircraft sustained substantial damage. The FAA and National Transportation Safety Board will investigate.

http://komonews.com

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