Monday, May 8, 2017

Piper PA-18A Super Cub, N245KW: Accident occurred May 08, 2017 at Coeur d'Alene Airport (KCOE), Kootenai County, Idaho

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Spokane 

http://registry.faa.gov/N245KW

NTSB Identification: WPR17LA102 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, May 08, 2017 in COEUR D'ALENE, ID
Aircraft: PIPER PA 18A, registration: N245KW
Injuries: 1 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 8, 2017, about 1337 Pacific daylight time, a Piper Super Cub PA18A, N245KW, sustained substantial damage when it impacted terrain at Coeur d'Alene Airport (COE), Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. The pilot, the sole occupant, sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to and operated by the owner as a personal flight under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the flight. 

In the written statement, the pilot reported that during takeoff, he applied one notch of flaps to assist with a shorter takeoff roll. During the initial climb, the airplane veered to the left and the pilot applied the right rudder; however, there was no response from the control input. About 50 to 75 feet above ground level, the pilot retarded the throttle, and initiated a forced landing. The airplane impacted the ground in a nose down position, and came to rest oriented about 90 degrees perpendicular to the runway.




HAYDEN — The pilot of a two-seat single-engine plane that crashed Monday at the Coeur d’Alene Airport danced a jig for medics before he was transported to Kootenai Health.

His plane, a Piper PA-18 Super Cub, sat — with a bent wing and body damage — in the grass at the end of the runway where the crash occurred.

“It’s a good crash when you can walk away from it,” airport operations manager Phil Cummings said.

The plane’s 61-year-old pilot, Frank G. Gordon, of Coeur d’Alene, was transported to Kootenai Health following the 1:40 p.m. crash.

Investigators from the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, which investigate aviation accidents, were at the airport Monday afternoon trying to determine the cause of the crash.

“It made a hard landing,” Allen Kenitzer, spokesman for the FAA said.

The agency released no further information.

According to witnesses, Gordon was taking off in his white and red Super Cub. The plane lifted off, witnesses said, then came back down as if to make a landing. Its left wing tilted down precariously, catching the edge of the runway causing the plane to overturn.

“The wing tip struck the ground,” Cummings said. “It cartwheeled the aircraft over.”

The plane came to rest at the end of the runway nearest Ramsey Avenue and Wyoming Street.

Kootenai County sheriff’s deputies and crewmembers from Northern Lakes Fire District responded to the scene.

“Gordon was the only occupant of the aircraft at the time of the crash,” according to a sheriff’s office press release. “(He) was conscious and alert … with obvious minor injuries.”

Gordon struck his head in the crash and had a sizeable gash, Cummings said.

He said when medics arrived, the pilot did a dance of gratitude for surviving the wreck.

When Cummings talked to family members Monday afternoon, he was told Gordon was undergoing surgery. Hospital representatives said Gordon was in fair condition at Kootenai Health as of 7 p.m. Monday.

Cummings suspects the Super Cub is totaled.

“It’s pretty destroyed,” he said. “It took a pretty good impact in the nose.”


Original article can be found here: http://www.cdapress.com




COEUR D'ALENE, Idaho - The pilot of a small aircraft was taken to Kootenai Health Monday following a failed take-off at the Coeur d'Alene Airport.

 Kootenai County Sheriff's Office says the pilot, 61-year-old Frank G. Gordon from Coeur d'Alene was trying to take off when they crashed just after 1:30 p.m. The plane sustained damage to the front and right wing. We're told the pilot was the only one on board and has minor injuries.

Gordon was the only person inside the plane at the time of the crash. He was taken to Kootenai Health to treat his injuries. 

The local office of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the local office of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has both been notified of the crash and are investigating. 

Story and video:  http://www.khq.com

Shortly before 1:40 p.m. today, deputies from the Kootenai County Sheriff’s Office and Northern Lakes Fire personnel were dispatched to the CD’A Airport reference an airplane crash.

First responders located a small, single-engine aircraft with extensive damage to the engine area and right wing. The pilot was identified as Frank G. Gordon, 61, of Coeur d’Alene. Gordon was the only occupant of the aircraft at the time of the crash. Gordon was conscious and alert when medical personnel arrived with obvious minor injuries sustained in the crash. Gordon was transported to Kootenai Health by medical personnel for treatment of his injuries.


Preliminary interviews indicate Gordon was likely taking off from the CD’A Airport when the crash occurred. Witnesses advised the plane had taken off but then, for unknown reasons, abruptly crashed. The airplane came to rest along a taxiway, within the airport’s fenced property, near Ramsey Rd. and Wyoming Ave.


The local office of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the local office of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have both been notified of this incident. The NTSB will be the lead agency investigating this incident.


Original article can be found here: http://www.spokesman.com

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