Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Beech D55, Absten Aviation LLC, N88EB: Accident occurred February 14, 2017 at Bolton Field Airport (KTZR), Columbus, Ohio

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA104 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, February 14, 2017 in Columbus, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/25/2017
Aircraft: BEECH D55, registration: N88EB
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The two multiengine-rated pilots departed in the multiengine airplane for a local personal flight in gusting crosswinds. The left seat pilot reported that he wanted to get current on his takeoffs and landings and that he performed the taxi and takeoff procedure. During the climbout, the left engine began to lose power. The left seat pilot gave the right seat pilot control of the airplane, and the right seat pilot conducted the landing. The left main landing gear struck the runway hard, which resulted in the collapse of the gear. A postaccident examination of the left engine and the fuel system revealed no anomalies that would have prevented normal operation.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The partial loss of left engine power during takeoff and initial climb, which led to a hard landing in gusting crosswind conditions. The reason for the loss of engine power could not be determined because postaccident examination of the left engine revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

On February 14, 2017, about 1330 eastern standard time, a Beech D55 airplane, N88EB, impacted runway 22 at the Bolton Field Airport (TZR), near Columbus, Ohio, following a loss of left engine power during takeoff. The pilot and pilot rated passenger were uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial fuselage and wing damage when the left main landing gear collapsed. The airplane was registered to Absten Aviation LLC and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which did not operate on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from TZR at the time of the accident.

According to information provided by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector, the pilot seated in the left seat reported that he wanted to get current on his takeoffs and landings. He performed the taxi and takeoff procedure. The left seated pilot stated that after rotation, the airplane began to climb. About 50 feet above ground level, the left engine began to lose power and its rpm began dropping to around 1,700 rpm. He told the right seated pilot that he was giving him control of the airplane. The right seated pilot tried to land the airplane within the remaining runway. The left main landing gear struck hard on the runway. The right seated pilot was able to stop the airplane on the prepared runway surface. The pilots thought the tire had blown during the hard landing. However, the left main landing gear had collapsed.

According to the pilot in command's accident report, seconds after rotation when the airplane was about 12 feet above ground level and at minimum controllable airspeed (Vmc) "plus 3" the left engine had a "power loss." As emergency procedures were performed, the airplane drifted left of the runway where it reached a maximum height of 24 feet at a maximum speed of Vmc "plus 6." During a forced landing to last 1,500 feet of runway at 30-degree descent angle, the airplane sustained a hard landing. The airplane was steered on the ground back to the runway centerline. Upon brake application, the left upper strut housing failed and the left engine sustained a propeller strike. The airplane then skidded to stop on the centerline about 500 feet from the runway end with no fire or fluid leaks.

At 1349, the recorded weather at TZR was: Wind 260 degrees at 13 knots gusting to 24 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 11 degrees C; dew point -2 degrees C; altimeter 29.81 inches of mercury.

A Federal Aviation Administration Inspector and an Air Safety Investigator from the engine manufacturer examined the wreckage. During the examination of the left engine, top spark plugs were removed and they exhibited dark combustion deposits with normal wear. All cylinders were inspected with a lighted bore scope and no anomalies noted. A thumb compression was obtained on all six cylinders when the engine was rotated. Additionally, engine continuity was established. No fuel was found in the engine fuel lines that were disconnected. The fuel supply line to the fuel manifold valve was disconnected and the left engine fuel boost pump pumped fuel from the left main fuel tank and the right main fuel tank in cross feed to the manifold valve. No anomalies were observed that would have prevented normal operations.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA104 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, February 14, 2017 in Columbus, OH
Aircraft: BEECH D55, registration: N88EB
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 14, 2017, about 1330 eastern standard time, a Beech D55 airplane, N88EB, impacted runway 22 at the Bolton Field Airport (TZR), near Columbus, Ohio, following a loss of left engine power during takeoff. The pilot and pilot rated passenger were uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial fuselage and wing damage when the left main landing gear collapsed. The airplane was registered to Absten Aviation LLC and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which did not operate on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from TZR at the time of the accident.

According to information provided by a Federal Aviation Administration Inspector, the pilot seated in the left seat reported that he wanted to get current on his takeoffs and landings. He performed the taxi and takeoff procedure. The left seated pilot stated that after rotation, the airplane began to climb. About 50 feet above ground level, the left engine began to lose power and its rpm began dropping to around 1,700 rpm. He told the right seated pilot that he was giving him control of the airplane. The right seated pilot tried to land the airplane within the remaining runway. The left main landing gear struck hard on the runway. The right seated pilot was able to stop the airplane on the prepared runway surface. The pilots thought the tire had blown during the hard landing. However, the left main landing gear had collapsed.

According to the pilot in command's accident report, seconds after rotation when the airplane was about 12 feet above ground level and at minimum controllable airspeed (Vmc) "plus 3" the left engine had a "power loss." As emergency procedures were performed, the airplane drifted left of the runway where it reached a maximum height of 24 feet at a maximum speed of Vmc "plus 6." During a forced landing to last 1,500 feet of runway at 30-degree descent angle, the airplane sustained a hard landing. The airplane was steered on the ground back to the runway centerline. Upon brake application, the left upper strut housing failed and the left engine sustained a propeller strike. The airplane then skidded to stop on the centerline about 500 feet from the runway end with no fire or fluid leaks.

At 1349, the recorded weather at TZR was: Wind 260 degrees at 13 knots gusting to 24 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 11 degrees C; dew point -2 degrees C; altimeter 29.81 inches of mercury.

A Federal Aviation Administration Inspector and an Air Safety Investigator from the engine manufacturer examined the wreckage. During the examination of the left engine, top spark plugs were removed and they exhibited dark combustion deposits with normal wear. All cylinders were inspected with a lighted bore scope and no anomalies noted. A thumb compression was obtained on all six cylinders when the engine was rotated. Additionally, engine continuity was established. No fuel was found in the engine fuel lines that were disconnected. The fuel supply line to the fuel manifold valve was disconnected and the left engine fuel boost pump pumped fuel from the left main fuel tank and the right main fuel tank in cross feed to the manifold valve. No anomalies were observed that would have prevented normal operations.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entities: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office: Columbus, Ohio

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report -  National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Absten Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N88EB

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA104
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, February 14, 2017 in Columbus, OH
Aircraft: BEECH D55, registration: N88EB
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On February 14, 2017, about 1326 eastern standard time, a Beech D55 airplane, N88EB, impacted runway 22 at the Bolton Field Airport (TZR), near Columbus, Ohio, following a loss of left engine power during takeoff. The pilot and pilot rated passenger were uninjured. The airplane sustained substantial fuselage and wing damage when the left main landing gear collapsed. The airplane was registered to Absten Aviation LLC and was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which did not operate on a flight plan. The local flight was originating from TZR at the time of the accident.

According to initial information from the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot seated in the left seat reported that he wanted to get current on his takeoffs and landings. He performed the taxi and takeoff procedure. The left seated pilot stated that after rotation, the airplane began to climb. About 50 feet above ground level, the left engine began to lose power and its rpm began dropping to around 1,700 rpm. He told the right seated pilot that he was giving him control of the airplane. The right seated pilot tried to land the airplane within the remaining runway. The left main landing gear struck hard on the runway. The right seated pilot was able to stop the airplane on the prepared runway surface. The pilots thought the tire had blown. However, the left main landing gear had collapsed.

At 1349, the recorded weather at TZR was: Wind 260 degrees at 13 knots gusting to 24 knots; visibility 10 statute miles; sky condition clear; temperature 11 degrees C; dew point -2 degrees C; altimeter 29.81 inches of mercury.

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