Thursday, November 24, 2016

Beech 200 Super King Air, N80RT, Operated by Flight Development LLC: Accident occurred November 23, 2016 near Moorhead Municipal Airport (KJKJ), Clay County, Minnesota

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA043
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 23, 2016 in Moorhead, MN
Probable Cause Approval Date: 09/06/2017
Aircraft: BEECH 200, registration: N80RT
Injuries: 3 Minor, 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The commercial pilot was conducting an on-demand passenger flight at night in instrument meteorological conditions that were at/near straight-in approach minimums for the runway. The pilot flew the approach as a nonprecision LNAV approach, and he reported that the approach was stabilized and that he did not notice anything unusual. A few seconds after leveling the airplane at the missed approach altitude, he saw the runway end lights, the strobe lights, and the precision approach path indicator. He then disconnected the autopilot and took his hand off the throttles to turn on the landing lights. However, before he could turn on the landing lights, the runway became obscured by clouds. The pilot immediately decided to conduct a missed approach and applied engine power, but the airplane subsequently impacted terrain short of the runway in a nose-up level attitude. The pilot reported that there were no mechanical anomalies with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation. It is likely the pilot lost sight of the runway due to the visibility being at/near the straight-in approach minimums and that the airplane got too low for a missed approach, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain.

A passenger stated that he and the pilot were not wearing available shoulder harnesses. The passenger said that he was not informed that the airplane was equipped with shoulder harnesses or told how to adjust the seats. The pilot sustained injuries to his face in the accident.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot's failure to attain a positive climb rate during an attempted missed approach in night instrument meteorological conditions that were at/near approach minimums, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain.

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

SLICE OF THE 406 LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N80RT

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA043 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 23, 2016 in Moorhead, MN
Aircraft: BEECH 200, registration: N80RT
Injuries: 3 Minor, 4 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 23, 2016, at 1759 central standard time, a Beech 200, N80RT, impacted terrain during a missed approach from runway 30 at Moorhead Municipal Airport (JKJ), Moorhead, Minnesota. The pilot initiated a missed approach after losing visual reference of the runway environment during the final segment of a GPS instrument approach. The pilot and two passengers sustained minor injuries and four passengers were uninjured. The airplane received substantial damage. The airplane was operated by Flight Development, LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as a single-pilot on-demand passenger flight. The flight was operating on an instrument rules flight plan. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed from Baudette International Airport (BDE), Baudette, Minnesota, at 1714 and was destined to JKJ.

A passenger stated that he and his work crew had been flying between Baudette and Moorhead on a weekly basis for the past 5-6 weeks to build agricultural storage facilities. The passenger stated that the pilot had flown the work crew on one of the previous flights, and the remainder of the flights were flown by the company chief pilot and the company director of operations. 

The passenger stated that the accident flight was the first flight in which he was seated in the copilot seat. The passenger stated that he and the pilot were not wearing a shoulder harness. The passenger stated that he was not informed that the airplane was equipped with shoulder harnesses, how to use them, and how to adjust the seats. The passenger stated that he would have adjusted the seat if he would have known that was an option and used his shoulder harness, as he is a safety conscious person. 

The pilot stated that before he was handed off from Minneapolis Center to Fargo Approach, he listened to the automated weather observing system (AWOS) at JKJ, which reported that light north winds, a ceiling of 300 feet above ground level, and 1.25 statute mile visibility. He checked in with Fargo Approach and informed them that he had the weather at JKJ and requested the area navigation (RNAV) approach to runway 30 starting at IVEJE, the initial approach fix (IAF). N80RT was not equipped with a wide area augmentation system (WAAS) GPS so he flew the approach as a non-precision lateral navigation (LNAV) approach (straight-in approach minima were: 300 feet above ground level and 1 statute mile visibility). He told Fargo Approach that he realized the weather was deteriorating and would make one attempt at JKJ and then divert to Hector International Airport (FAR), Fargo, North Dakota. Fargo Approach issued a clearance to the IAF, and initial approach altitude, and provided missed approach instructions. The pilot stated that he had flown this approach numerous times and briefed the approach. He stated that the approach was stabilized with the appropriate altitudes and airspeeds throughout and did not notice anything unusual. Upon leveling off at the missed approach altitude of 1,300 feet mean sea level, he looked for the runway. After what seemed like just a few seconds he saw the runway end lights, the strobe lights, and the precision approach path indicator. He disconnected the autopilot and took his hand off the throttles to turn on the landing lights for landing. Before he could even turn on the landing lights, the runway disappeared from sight due to the clouds. He immediately decided to perform a missed approach and applied engine power. He said that he referenced the flight director, but did not recall what it was indicating. He did not feel any sinking feeling indicating that he was losing altitude. He said that It seemed like just a few seconds before the airplane impacted the ground. The airplane struck the ground in somewhat of a nose-up, level bank attitude. The airplane slid along the ground and turned slightly to the right before coming to rest.

The passenger stated that prior to departure, the pilot said they needed to get going because the weather was getting bad in Fargo. While en route, the passenger heard Fargo Air Traffic Control Tower advise weather was not good, and the pilot stated he would try to fly to JKJ first and then fly to FAR, if that did not work. The passenger said the pilot asked him to be on the lookout for the runway and about 3,600 feet the airplane banked to line up for the approach. The passenger said he heard an audible "too low" warning three times, saw some runway lights at eye level, and then the airplane impacted the ground. The passenger said he did not think the pilot initiated a go-around, and he did not see him adjust engine power settings or move the control yoke. The passenger stated that he received facial injuries that required stitches.

The pilot reported that there was no mechanical malfunction/failure with the airplane.

The pilot's safety recommendation on how the accident could have been prevented was:

"Stick to my normal personal weather minimums and not attempt a non-precision approach to minimums. It would of been so easy to go to Fargo and do the ILS. I have always lectured to my students on the advantage of having two pilots when things are challenging. This is a prime example of such [an accident]. Over confidence is always something that we have to try to keep in check."

A review of the pilot's training records showed that the pilot completed the company's Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approved ground and flight training program, dated August 17, 2016. The ground training was conducted by the company director of operations and the company chief pilot. The pilot's flight training, which was 10.8 hours in duration, was conducted by the company chief pilot. The pilot received and passed his most recent Part 135.293 Airman Proficiency Check, dated August 18, 2016, which was conducted by an FAA inspector from the Fargo Flight Standards District Office. The check was performed using a Beech 200 and was 1.7 hours in flight duration. The pilot received a grade of satisfactory for all of the check's maneuvers/procedures.

FAA Advisory Circular 91-65, Use of Shoulder Harnesses in Passenger Seats, states in part:

On December 17, 1985, the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) issued safety recommendation A-85-124, recommending issuance of advisory circular to provide information on crash survivability aspects of small aircraft. The recommendation was the result of an NTSB general aviation airplane crashworthiness project. In the project, the safety board examined 500 relatively severe general aviation airplane accident, to determine what proportion of the occupants would have benefited from the use of shoulder harnesses and energy-absorbing seats. The safety board found that 20 percent of the fatally-injured occupants in these accidents could have survived with shoulder harnesses (assuming the seat belt was fastened) and 88 percent of the seriously injured could have had significantly less severe injuries with the use of shoulder harnesses. Energy-absorbing seats could have benefited 34 percent

of the seriously injured. The safety board concluded that shoulder harness use is the most effective way of reducing fatalities and serious injuries in general aviation accidents.

Part 135.117, Briefing of Passengers Before Flight, states that before each takeoff each pilot in command of an aircraft carrying passengers shall ensure that all passengers have been orally briefed on: the use of seat belts, the placement of seat backs in an upright position before takeoff and landing, location and means for opening the passenger entry door and emergency exits, location of survival equipment, if the flight involves extended overwater operation, ditching procedures and the use of required flotation equipment, if the flight involves operations above 12,000 feet MSL, the normal and emergency use of oxygen, and location and operation of fire extinguishers.

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA043
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Wednesday, November 23, 2016 in Moorehead, MN
Aircraft: BEECH 200, registration: N80RT
Injuries: 2 Minor, 5 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 23, 2016, at 1759 central standard time, a Beech 200, N80RT, impacted terrain during a missed approach from runway 30 at Moorhead Municipal Airport (JKJ), Moorhead, Minnesota. The pilot initiated a missed approach after losing visual reference of the runway environment during the final segment of a GPS instrument approach. The airplane impacted a field about 0.5 miles short of runway 30. The pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries and five passengers were uninjured. The airplane received substantial damage. The airplane was operated by Flight Development, LLC under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as an on-demand passenger flight. The flight was operating on an instrument rules flight plan. Night instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The flight departed from Baudette International Airport (BDE), Baudette, Minnesota, at 1714 and was destined to JKJ.




Federal Aviation Administration officials are in northwestern Minnesota looking into what caused a plane to make an emergency landing near the Moorhead Airport.

The privately owned plane landed in a field around 6 p.m. Wednesday near the airport runway. 

Clay County Sheriff's Deputy Mike Trygg says it was not a crash. 

"This was nothing like that. It just landed short of the runway,"Trygg said. "And everybody walked away alive." 

Seven people were onboard and no major injuries were reported. The pilot was taken to a hospital as a precaution. 


Authorities say the accident caused substantial damage to the airplane. 




MOORHEAD, Minn. - UPDATE (7:22pm): Clay County Sheriff's Department says they believe that fog was a contributing factor but can't confirm exact cause of crash.

UPDATE (7:00pm): Clay County Sheriff's Department confirms to Valley News Live that seven people were on board a Beech 200 Super King Air when it crashed just east of the airport in a field.

The pilot was taken to the hospital by FM Ambulance with minor injuries, the six other passengers walked away from the scene.

Some have minor injuries, but all are expected to be okay.

The plane was traveling from a location out of Minnesota.

Right now, the cause of the crash is unknown.

ORIGINAL STORY: Red River dispatch confirmed that a plane has crashed at the Moorhead municipal airport at 3309 70th St S, Glyndon, MN.

Moorhead Police, Clay County Sheriffs and fire crews are on scene.

Story and video:   http://www.valleynewslive.com




CLAY COUNTY, Minn. -

UPDATE: 9:00PM:

A plane with seven men on board crashed in a field just to the east of the Moorhead Airport and it sent emergency crews into action.

Rescue crews responded to the field at 70th Street and 40th Avenue South in Moorhead just after 6:30 p.m.

Authorities say everyone was able to get off of the plane on their own.

The pilot was taken to the hospital to be checked out for minor injuries but none of the others were seriously hurt.

Authorities were concerned about the damage to the plane.

"There's a slight fuel leak to it now," said Lt. Mark Empting with the Clay County Sheriff's Department. "The fire department has been out there. They did check it along with calling the state duty officer. At this point, it doesn't appear to have any hazard of catching fire or anything like that."

The FAA will investigate.

It is not known if the fog played a part in the crash.

UPDATE 7:00PM:

Law enforcement and rescue squads are on the scene of a site near the airport where a plane crashed before 6:20pm Wednesday night.

Crews responded to 70th Street and 40th Avenue South in Moorhead.

Clay County Deputies tell KVRR's Nick Broadway that after preliminary inspection of the plane's damage, the pilot made a crash landing.

There were six other passengers on the plane but no one was seriously injured.

Deputies say all were able to walk away from the plane but one person did need to be taken to the hospital.

At this time, investigators are not sure if fog or the weather played a factor.

Hear from rescue squads on KVRR Local News at 9.

We will update you with any details that come into the newsroom.

PREVIOUS CONTENT:

Law enforcement and rescue squads are on the scene of a possible crash site near the airport.

Clay County Sheriff Bill Bergquist is on the scene and a command post has been set up.

Multiple agencies from the surrounding communities of Moorhead, Dilworth and Glyndon are responding including police, ambulances and fire.


Story and video:  http://www.kvrr.com


Moorhead, MN (WDAY TV) - Seven adult males were able to walk away from an aircraft crash near the Moorhead Municipal Airport.

Dispatch officials say an aircraft reportedly crashed just East of the runway at the Moorhead Airport on Highway 336 around 6:05 p.m.

Emergency crews were sent to 3303 70th Street South in rural Glyndon after a business plane crashed.

The plane was arriving at the airport just east of a plowed field, according to Deputy Mark Empting, Clay County Sheriff's Department. It was coming from somewhere in the state of Minnesota. The plane is a Beech 200 Super King Air.

Seven adult males were on board at the time. The pilot and some of the others on board suffered 'slight' injuries. The pilot was able to walk away from the plane and talk with medics on scene. He was taken to a local hospital by F-M ambulance.

All passengers were able to evacuate the plane themselves.

Officials are still working on determining a cause of the crash. The pilot didn't indicate if weather was the cause but authorities say heavy fog could have possibly played a factor, but that hasn't been confirmed.

Fire officials say there was a slight gas leak coming from the plane but it's not at risk of catching fire.

No word on a damage estimate but there was visible damage to the underside of the plane and to the plane's engine.

The FAA and NTSB will be headed out to the scene to investigate the exact cause of the crash.

Source:   https://www.wday.com


MOORHEAD - Emergency crews responded to an aircraft crash near the Moorhead Municipal Airport on Wednesday night.

The crash occurred around 6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 22, where crews found a privately owned, business-type aircraft in a field just east of County Road 11 near the airport runway.

Lt. Mark Empting of the Clay County Sheriff's Office said there were seven passengers on board including the pilot. There were no reports of any major injuries, but the pilot was taken to a local hospital as a precautionary measure. Empting said some passengers were "saying they were sore here and there, but it sounds like they were minor-type things." All passengers were able to evacuate the aircraft on their own.

"It's not an everyday occurrence, it's not an every year occurrence," Empting said of the plane crash. "It's a rare thing that happens which we are fortunate for."

The crash caused "substantial damage" to the plane, Empting added, and crews would be taking a closer look Thursday morning to assess the damage.

It's unknown at this time what caused the crash, but the plane was reportedly traveling from somewhere in Minnesota. The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board will be doing an investigation.

Responding to the scene were the Clay County Sheriff's Office, Moorhead Police Department and Moorhead Fire Department.

Source:  http://www.inforum.com

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