Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Diamond DA20-C1 Katana, Falcon Aviation Academy LLC, N85WP (and) Beechcraft F33A Bonanza, N6027K: Fatal accident occurred September 07, 2016 at West Georgia Regional Airport (KCTJ), Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Preliminary Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board  -   Aviation Accident Preliminary Report:    http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Falcon Aviation Academy LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N85WP

William L. Lindsey: http://registry.faa.gov/N6027K

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA312A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: BEECH F33, registration: N6027K
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA312B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, September 07, 2016 in Carrollton, GA
Aircraft: DIAMOND AIRCRAFT IND INC DA20, registration: N85WP
Injuries: 3 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On September 7, 2016, at 1047 eastern daylight time, a Beech F33A, N6027K, and a Diamond Aircraft Industries DA20-C1, N85WP, collided in midair on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern to runway 35 at West Georgia Regional Airport (CTJ), Carrollton, Georgia. The Beech was substantially damaged and the private pilot was fatally injured. The Diamond was destroyed and the flight instructor and one student pilot were fatally injured. The Beech was registered to and operated by the private pilot. The Diamond was registered to and operated by Falcon Aviation Academy LLC. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91; the Beech pilot was conducting a personal flight to CTJ and the Diamond pilots were conducting a local, instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans were filed for the Beech or the Diamond. The Beech departed from Fulton County Airport (FTY), Atlanta, Georgia about 1020, and the Diamond departed from Newnan Coweta County Airport (CCO), Newnan, Georgia about 1000.

According to personnel from Falcon Aviation Academy, the pilots of the Diamond were practicing traffic pattern operations and landings at CTJ. The Diamond was the first airplane to enter the traffic pattern, followed a few minutes later by N263CF and then by N169PS, both Falcon Academy DA20s. The flight instructor and student pilot on board N263CF observed a Beech Bonanza on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern; however, the Beech pilot did not appear to be broadcasting his intentions on the CTJ common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF). Moments later, the flight instructor and student pilot on board N169PS entered the traffic pattern from the east. They looked down and to the left, in the direction of the final approach path for runway 35, and observed two airplanes merge, then collide. They also did not hear the pilot of the Beech broadcasting his intentions on the CTAF. All pilots on board both trailing DA20s heard the flight instructor on board the accident Diamond making her position calls in the traffic pattern prior to the collision, the last call being made on the final approach leg of the traffic pattern.

Initial radar data provided by air traffic control indicated that the pilot of Beech entered an extended downwind from the north, above and directly behind the Diamond, which was also on downwind leg of the traffic pattern. The ground speed of the Beech was about 50 knots greater than the Diamond. The last radar returns, were about 2,000 feet above mean sea level, or about 850 feet above the ground. The locations of the last radar returns were in an area on the downwind leg of the traffic pattern, approaching the base leg of the traffic pattern for runway 35.

Initial examination of the wreckage revealed that both airplanes remained physically attached after the collision until ground impact. The main wreckage of both airplanes came to rest about 408 feet south of the approach end of runway 35, and on the extended centerline of the runway. The wreckage of the Beech was inverted and on top of the Diamond wreckage. Lightweight pieces of the Diamond were found on a northerly path, beginning 340 feet south of the main wreckage. All major structural components of both airplanes were accounted for within the wreckage path boundary. One of the most southerly pieces of wreckage debris was the right half of the Diamond's elevator. Closer examination revealed black transfer markings on the upper surface that were consistent in color and tread pattern with the right main landing gear tire of the Beech. Examination of the Diamond's horizontal stabilizer revealed similar transfer markings on its upper surface. The other small pieces of debris located south of the main wreckage were identified as sections of the Diamond's canopy and wing root/fuselage skin.

The pilot of the Beech, age 79, held a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) private pilot certificate with airplane single engine land and instrument airplane ratings. He held a FAA third class medical certificate with a restriction to have glasses available for near vision. He reported 2,500 total hours of flying experience on his medical certificate application that was dated October 5, 2015.

The flight instructor in the Diamond, age 24, held a FAA commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land, airplane single engine land, and instrument airplane. She was seated in the right cockpit seat. She held a FAA flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single engine. She reported 600 total hours of flying experience on her FAA first class medical certificate application that was dated March 16, 2016.

The student pilot in the Diamond, age 20, held a FAA student pilot certificate. He held a FAA second-class medical certificate with no restrictions. He was seated in the left cockpit seat. He enrolled in the ab initio training program at Falcon Aircraft Academy on August 4, 2016, and had logged about 20 hours of flight time.

CTJ was a public, non-towered airport with a single runway, designated 17/35. The runway was 5,503 feet long and 100 feet wide. The published traffic pattern direction for runway 35 was to the left. Falcon Aviation Academy personnel reported that their pilots frequently used CTJ for training purposes. CTAF communications were not recorded.

The wreckage of both airplanes was retained by the NTSB for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Taylor Nicole Stone, 24, of Newnan, Georgia, died on Wednesday, September 7, 2016.

Taylor was born and raised in Chattanooga. She was a graduate of Chattanooga Christian School in 2010 and Middle Tennessee State University in 2014. She was a member of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church was employed at Falcon Aviation Academy in Newnan, GA, where she was a flight instructor. She was also a member of the ALPHA ETA RHO aviation fraternity, MU TAU Chapter.

She was preceded in death by her grandfather, Silas Rudolph Stone.

Surviving are her parents, Doug and Cindy Stone; sister, Shelby Ryan Stone; paternal grandmother, Mary Lois Stone; maternal grandmother, Mary Katherine Clarke and husband, William H. Clarke; and several aunts, uncles and cousins.

Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. on Sunday at the funeral home.

Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. on Monday at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 822 Belvoir Ave., Chattanooga, Tn. 37412, with Reverend Christopher Sheets and Reverend Clifford Herd officiating.

Memorial donations may be made to the Good Shepherd Youth Group.


Arrangements are by the East Chapel of Chattanooga Funeral Home, Crematory, and Florist, 404 South Moore Road.  


Taylor Nicole Stone



CARROLL COUNTY, Ga. -- One of the victims of a fatal plane crash is being remembered as a devoted airman.

Wednesday, William L. "Bill" Lindsey, 79, of College Park was killed along with two other people when planes collided while trying to land near the West Georgia Regional Airport, in Carrollton, Ga.

A day after the tragic accident, friends and family were remembering Bill for  his love of flying.

"Bill would call me, 'Sam, let's go flying'," one friend told 11Alive. "Man we would go flying just to get up in the air."

If there's one thing Bill loved, it was spending time in the sky.

"It was something about the wheels leaving the ground," his friend of 20 years said.

"I wouldn't go anywhere without first calling Bill," he said. "Say, 'Bill, I want you to look over my flight plan. See if there's anything I'm missing.' His knowledge was so extensive, I mean, he could tell you page and verse what's in the Airman's Information Manual."

Lindsey was also an 18-year member of the Georgia Wing's Fulton Composite Squadron of the Civil Air Patrol (CAP). According to CAP, he served as commander of his squadron between 2007 and 2012.

“Bill Lindsey was a devoted member of Civil Air Patrol’s Georgia Wing,” said Georgia’s Wing Commander Col. Richard Greenwood.  “He was serious about his professional development training, and he applied the skills and knowledge he gained to benefit his squadron and his community on an ongoing basis." 

"Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and the members of his unit,” he said.  “He will be missed by all of us,” Greenwood said. The Civil Air Patrol is a all-volunteer auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force that, among other things, assists with search and rescue missions."

A long time employee of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Lindsay used his wings to help people. Even after he retired he was often mentoring young pilots, taking Angel Flights or just taking in the sky on his own.

That's what he was doing Wednesday morning when his plane collided with that of Taylor Stone - and her young student.

According to the FAA, a Diamond Aircraft DA20C1 piloted by Stone, a flight instructor, and Lindsey's Beech F33A, collided just before 11 a.m.

The third passenger was a 20-year-old flight student from China. 11Alive has learned he came to Georgia to learn to fly.

Story and video:   http://www.11alive.com
















CARROLL COUNTY, GA (CBS46) -  Authorities confirm a 24-year-old flight instructor was one of three people killed when two small planes collided near the West Georgia Regional Airport Wednesday.

Taylor Stone, a native of East Ridge, Tennessee, worked for Falcon Aviation Academy in Newnan. She had a 20-year-old student-pilot in the plane with her. Authorities have not identified him, saying only that he was in the country on a visa.

"Two witnesses [saw] both aircraft collide midair. It appeared they both were on a landing pattern," Carroll County Fire Chief Scott Blue said.

Two single-engine aircraft, a Diamond DA20-C1 Katana and a Beechcraft F33A Bonanza, collided near the airport at 10:54 a.m. on Wednesday. One of the planes is registered to an address in College Park. The other is registered to Falcon Aviation school in Newnan.

William Barczak once took lessons from Stone.

"She was a really great teacher," Barczak told CBS46. "I was in disbelief because she was so strict in the cockpit.  She went by the books, everything step by step. I just couldn't believe it. I was in shock."

Falcon representatives arrived at the West Georgia Regional Airport but had no comment about the crash.

Authorities identified the pilot of the other plane as William Lindsey, 79, of College Park.

The FAA and the NTSB were on scene most of Wednesday evening gathering evidence to try to determine what led to the crash.

"Basically, both planes were coming in on a final approach at the same time, and it appears one may not have seen the other and sat down on top of it and they tumbled into the ground," Carroll County Sheriff's Deputy Captain Jeff Richards said.

Carroll county airport is "non-controlled"

West Georgia Regional Airport is what's called a non-controlled airport, which means there is no operating air traffic control tower. The FAA has regulations to control traffic, but pilots are largely responsible for taking care of themselves at the nearly 20,000 non-controlled airports that exist across the country.

Neither aircraft had a voice recorder on board, so investigators must rely on eyewitness accounts and evidence from the wreckage as they piece together what happened.

Joe Fagendes of LaGrange is a retired Delta Air Lines pilot and current General Aviation Pilot who has flown for more than 50 years. He said regional aircraft often take off and land at these airports.

Fagundes said, “At non-controlled airports, just because there’s no control tower, it doesn’t mean it’s unsafe. Safety of flying is the responsibility of the pilot. 

 “It’s not a dangerous operation just because you have certain patterns to fly at non-controlled towers, a certain altitude you have to fly,” he said.


Story and video: http://www.cbs46.com






A flight instructor, her student and a third person died Wednesday after two small airplanes collided in midair at a rural airport in western Georgia, where one witness told authorities the pilots may have been trying to land at the same time.

The single-engine planes crashed just before 11 a.m. near the end of the lone runway at West Georgia Regional Airport, said Carroll County Fire Chief Scott Blue. The airport is located in Carrollton, about 45 miles west of Atlanta.

Capt. Jeff Richards of the Carroll County Sheriff's Office identified the deceased flight instructor as 24-year-old Taylor Nicole Stone of East Ridge, Tennessee. Her student, who also died, was identified only as a male, pending notification of his family.

The third fatality, 79-year-old William Lewis Lindsey of College Park, was alone in the other plane, Richards said.

The cause of the deadly collision was under investigation. But Blue said a witness reported the planes looked like they were attempting to land simultaneously.

"Another pilot in the air said it appeared that both of them were trying to land and one came on top of the other," Blue told The Associated Press in a phone interview. "At this point in time we can't really confirm that."

The Federal Aviation Administration said both were single-engine airplanes — a Diamond Aircraft DA20C1 and a Beech F33A.

Blue said a lone pilot was killed in the Beech aircraft registered in College Park, about 40 miles east of the airport. A pilot and passenger died onboard the Diamond plane, which the fire chief said was registered to a company that trains pilots in Newnan, 22 miles to the southeast.

No one survived the crash.

First responders found the wreckage of the two planes all twisted and mixed together.

"Our unit when they first came thought it was one plane," Blue said. "They were intermixed so much it was hard to identify two planes at first."

The Federal Aviation Administration said it was investigating the crash in conjunction with the National Transportation Safety Board, which will determine the official cause.

Source:   http://abcnews.go.com

Two planes collided as they approached the runway of a suburban Atlanta airport Wednesday morning, leaving three people dead.

A flight instructor and her student were among those killed in the crash at West Georgia Regional Airport.

Carroll County Sheriff's Capt. Jeff Richards said the two planes were both coming in at final approach and "set down on top of the other."

"It appears one may not have seen the other one," Richards said.

The 10:54 a.m. accident was witnessed by other several other pilots in the area.

The female instructor and her male student were from a flight school in Newnan. The second plane contained a single male pilot.

Officials would not immediately provide more details about the victims. But a family pastor and friend identified the flight instructor as Taylor Stone, a Chattanooga native who lived in Newnan. Stone's Facebook page said she worked at Falcon Aviation Academy.

One aircraft was a Diamond Aircraft DA20C1 and the other was a Beech F33A.

The airport has no air-traffic controllers, and no control tower. Pilots communicate on a shared frequency.

"It's basically non-controlled airspace you report your movements as you come through," Richards said.

Carroll County Fire Chief Scott Blue said there was no fire when the planes crashed. He said it will take some work to identify the bodies because of the extensive damage.

The NTSB is securing the crash site and wreckage with plans to return in the morning. They will determine the cause of the crash. The FAA is also investigating.

Story and video:   http://www.ajc.com





CARROLLTON, GA. - Three people were killed after two single aircraft collided in midair Wednesday morning. 

The incident took place near West Georgia Regional Airport, in Carrollton, Ga.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, a Diamond Aircraft DA20C1 and a Beech F33A, collided just before 11 a.m.

Carroll County Fire Rescue tells 11Alive's Ryan Kruger the two planes were trying to land at the same time when they collided. One of the planes is registered out of College Park, while the other is from Newnan.

The three people killed were all adults, two men and one woman. 

The FAA will investigate and the NTSB will determine the cause of the accident. 

Story and video:   http://www.11alive.com





Three people died Wednesday after two small airplanes collided in midair at a rural airport in western Georgia, where one witness told authorities the pilots may have been trying to land at the same time.

The single-engine planes crashed just before 11 a.m. near the end of the lone runway at West Georgia Regional Airport, said Carroll County Fire Chief Scott Blue. The airport is located in Carrollton, about 45 miles west of Atlanta.

The dead were two men and one woman, Carroll County Chief Deputy Coroner Ed Baskin said. The woman and a man were in one plane and the second man was alone in the other plane, he said.

Baskin said the names of the dead were being withheld until their families have been notified.

The cause of the deadly collision was under investigation. But Blue said a witness reported the planes looked like they were attempting to land simultaneously.

"Another pilot in the air said it appeared that both of them were trying to land and one came on top of the other," Blue told The Associated Press in a phone interview. "At this point in time we can't really confirm that."

The Federal Aviation Administration said both were single-engine airplanes — a Diamond Aircraft DA20C1 and a Beech F33A.

Blue said a lone pilot was killed in the Beech aircraft registered in College Park, about 40 miles east of the airport. A pilot and passenger died onboard the Diamond plane, which the fire chief said was registered to a company that trains pilots in Newnan, 22 miles to the southeast.

No one survived the crash.

First responders found the wreckage of the two planes all twisted and mixed together.

"Our unit when they first came thought it was one plane," Blue said. "They were intermixed so much it was hard to identify two planes at first."

The Federal Aviation Administration said it was investigating the crash in conjunction with the National Transportation Safety Board, which will determine the official cause.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

It's getting a bit worrisome to see the recent number of accidents involving older pilots, late 70's and 80's, . I I personally know of at least 2 older pilots,77&86, both flying complex aircraft, the 86 yr old a twin. Constantly see him not using the radio, complaining about modern avionics that they can't really use or understand, yet they won't pack it in, just keep on flying

Anonymous said...

Two things:
1) it's kinda strange that Bonanza was upside down on top of the Diamond. Spin?
2) DA-20 airspeed on final is what, 45kt? Bonanza is more like 90kt. The Bonanza driver could have miscalculated closure rate and caught up to the Diamond.

Anonymous said...

Unfortunately I predict we will see a lot more of this kind of thing thanks to AOPA's and other agencies' misguided yet successful efforts to repeal the aviation medical exam, bowing to lobbying efforts from their older members worried they will be grounded.

It is one thing to wait until a fender bender to quit driving. Now we all have to worry about grandpa's failing eyesight in the air. He's good to go as long as any nonspecialist, non-aviation MD sees him once every 4 years.

Expect more to come. It is hard to "self-assess" visual acuity until it is too late.

Anonymous said...

My bet is someone was not on the radio,very sad story my prayers go out to the familys