Thursday, November 17, 2016

Curtiss JN4D Jenny, N1662, registered to and operated by the pilot: Fatal accident occurred November 17, 2016 near Peach State Airport (GA2), Williamson, Pike County, Georgia

Federal Aviation Administration Inspector Larry Daniel Enlow 
November 26, 1947 – November 17, 2016

 Larry was admired and esteemed throughout the national general aviation community, where his outstanding airmanship, expertise in numerous disciplines and dedicated efforts enabled the Orlando Flight Standards District Office to achieve the highest standards of professional performance. His contributions will have a lasting impact.



Ronald Ray Alexander, 74

Ron’s love of flying began at the age of 14 and he received his pilot’s license at the age of 17. After high school and college, he joined the United States Air Force where he served his country in the Vietnam War. The Air Force awarded Ron the Distinguished Flying Cross and two Air Medals. In 1969, he was hired by Delta Air Lines where he worked until retirement in 2002, with 34 years of service as Chief Pilot. Ron was an entrepreneur having owned and operated several businesses since 1979. In March 2004, Ron founded the Candler Field Museum, a non-profit organization. Candler Field is named after the original Atlanta airport.


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Ron R. Alexander: http://registry.faa.gov/N1662



National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Factual Report 

Location: Williamson, GA
Accident Number: ERA17FA050
Date & Time: 11/17/2016, 1740 EST
Registration: N1662
Aircraft: CURTISS JN4
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Part(s) separation from AC
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On November 17, 2016, at 1740 eastern standard time, an experimental, amateur-built Curtiss JN4D, N1662, collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Peach State Airport (GA2), Williamson, Georgia. The airline transport pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and fire. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Dusk, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which was originating at the time of the accident.

According to a witness, the airplane departed runway 31, appeared to enter a normal climb, and the engine sounded "as it always did." As the airplane passed the runway end markers, about 110-120 ft above the ground, he heard a loud backfire followed by two "pops" that were not as loud. The airplane seemed to hesitate for an instant, then there was silence. He observed the airplane in a left turn. After about 90º of turn, he saw a flicker of flame appear from the forward, left side of the fuselage that progressed into a "raging fire," with an audible "whoomp" sound. The fire streamed back over the top and left side of the fuselage and extended about 1/2 the length of the airplane. The fire persisted and the airplane disappeared behind a tree line and crashed. The witness immediately called the authorities. Another witness provided a cell phone photo of the airplane on the takeoff leg, which showed a fire near the forward section of the airplane.

The passenger in the airplane for a flight immediately before the accident flight reported that his flight was uneventful. The engine performed normally, and he did not smell fuel during the flight. After landing, he exited the airplane and his colleague climbed into the front seat and "strapped in." He observed the airplane take off. He turned his back momentarily and heard someone scream, "fire." When he saw the airplane in flight, the forward fuselage was "engulfed in flames" and he no longer heard the engine running. The airplane turned toward the south, and the fire appeared to spread to the wings before the airplane descended rapidly into trees. 


Ron Alexander

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Flight Engineer
Age: 74, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Rear
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Glider
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 06/29/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  25200 hours (Total, all aircraft)


Larry Enlow

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 68, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Front
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/12/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: 13862 hours (Total, all aircraft) 

The pilot, seated in the aft cockpit seat, held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine and glider. He also held flight instructor and mechanic certificates. He reported 25,200 hours of flight experience on his most recent FAA second-class medical certificate, dated June 29, 2016.

The pilot-rated passenger, seated in the front cockpit seat, held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land, and airplane single- and multiengine sea. He also held flight and ground instructor certificates. He reported 13,862 hours of flight experience on his most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate, dated May 12, 2016. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CURTISS
Registration: N1662
Model/Series: JN4 D
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2013
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: 6062
Landing Gear Type: Tailwheel
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/20/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2400 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 10 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 71 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Hispano-Suiza
ELT: Not installed
Engine Model/Series: E-2
Registered Owner: On file
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

The single-engine, bi-wing, fabric-covered airplane incorporated a dual, tandem, open cockpit. The landing gear comprised two main wheels and a tail skid. The airplane was equipped with a Hispano-Suiza E-2, 8-cylinder, water-cooled, reciprocating engine rated at 200 horsepower. The engine was fitted with a St. Croix wood laminate fixed-pitch propeller. A total restoration of the airframe and engine was completed in 2013. The airplane was restored mainly from new material; however, some vintage parts were used, such as the radiator, engine, and fuel tank. A condition inspection of the airframe and engine was completed on June 20, 2016. On that date, the aircraft total time was 58.6 hours, and about 10.5 hours were accrued since that inspection. 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Dusk
Observation Facility, Elevation: GA2, 926 ft msl
Observation Time: 1815 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 60°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 9°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Williamson, GA (GA2)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Williamson, GA (GA2)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1740 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G 

Griffin-Spalding County Airport (6A2), Griffin, Georgia, was located about 6 miles northeast of the accident site. The 6A2 weather at 1815 included calm wind, visibility 10 statute miles, sky clear, temperature 17°C, dew point 9°C, and altimeter setting 30.12 inches of mercury. 



Airport Information

Airport: Peach State (GA2)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 926 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 31
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2400 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: Both
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  33.184444, -84.384722 (est) 

The accident site was located about 1,060 ft southwest of the departure end of runway 31. The airplane came to rest upright in a grass field at the edge of a wooded area. There was no lateral wreckage path across the ground and no discernible impact crater. Fire consumed the entire airframe with the exception of the aft fuselage and empennage. Flight control cable continuity was established from the ailerons, elevator, and rudder to the dual cockpit controls. A coating of residue consistent with engine oil was found on the lower surfaces of the horizontal stabilizer and elevator.

All structure and components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site, with the exception of a 45-inch-long section of one blade of the wood-laminate propeller. The missing blade section was later found in a wooded area, about 380 ft southwest of the departure end of runway 31 and about 670 ft from the main wreckage.

The engine sustained fire and heat damage. The engine was rigidly mounted to wooden engine bearers and vibration isolators were not installed. The magnetos, carburetor, oil pump, and fuel pump were examined. No anomalies were noted; however, fire and heat damage precluded functional testing of these components. The spark plugs were removed; the electrodes exhibited normal wear and color when compared to a Champion inspection chart. The engine crankshaft was turned manually; internal engine continuity was confirmed. Compression and suction were observed on all cylinders and valve action was correct. The oil screen was clean and free of contaminants. The copper line from the engine to the oil pressure gauge was separated and burned.

An examination of the fuel tank and remaining fuel system components was performed. The steel fuel tank, which was an original Curtiss component, was ruptured from impact with the wooden engine bearers. No internal contamination was found, and the tank was dry. The fuel shutoff valve, which was installed at the lower right side of the tank, was separated and found loose in the wreckage. The shutoff valve was controlled from the aft cockpit seat, and the linkage was still attached to the valve. The aluminum plumbing between the valve and the gascolator was partially consumed by fire; however, the fittings remained intact. A fuel wobble pump, originally installed in the aft cockpit, was fire-damaged and loose in the wreckage. The firewall-mounted gascolator was dry and contained no contaminants.

The aft cockpit seat was equipped with a four-point harness and the front cockpit seat was equipped with a lap belt. All buckles were found attached and the harness and lap belt webbings were consumed by fire. The airplane was not equipped with an emergency locator transmitter. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Division of Forensic Sciences, Decatur, Georgia, performed the autopsy of the pilot. The cause of death was exposure to aircraft fire with extensive thermal injuries.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot. Testing for ethanol and carbon monoxide was negative. Alfuzosin was detected in the blood and urine, and rosuvastatin was detected in the urine. These medications are not generally considered impairing.

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation, Division of Forensic Sciences, also performed the autopsy of the pilot-rated passenger. The cause of death was blunt impact injuries of the head and torso.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Research Sciences Laboratory performed toxicology testing on specimens from the pilot-rated passenger. Testing for ethanol and carbon monoxide was negative. Amlodipine was detected in the blood and urine. This medication is not generally considered impairing. 

Tests And Research

The recovered propeller pieces were sent to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for examination. The propeller was a two-bladed, fixed-pitch, wood laminate propeller with formed copper sheets with lead/tin filler attached to the tips and leading edges. For purposes of this report, the blade with the piece that separated in flight and was recovered 670 ft from the main wreckage was labeled blade "A," and the blade found within the main wreckage was labeled blade "B."

The leading edge strip on blade A had a transverse fracture between the leading and trailing edges of the strip at a location where the piece transitioned from the full-width tip portion to the leading edge strip. The underlying wood of the blade was fractured spanwise along the wood grain, and the fracture intersected two of the rivet holes attaching the leading edge/tip piece. The strip fracture features showed substantial damage consistent with fracture surface recontact. Most of the fracture surfaces were obscured due to recontact damage or deposits; however, in some protected areas, transgranular fractures with curving crack arrest lines were observed, consistent with fatigue. Fatigue features emanated from origins at the filled depression associated with the rivet, with crack propagation directed toward the leading and trailing edges of the blade. Fatigue striations were counted in four selected fracture areas, with striations per inch values ranging from 20,250 to 79,320. Aluminum oxide deposits were found on the fracture surfaces on the forward side of the leading-edge piece.

According to the primary caretaker and restorer of the airplane, a crack was observed in the leading edge strip of the propeller, near the tip, in July 2015. A photograph of the crack before repair is included in the NTSB Materials Laboratory Addendum Report (17-032B), located in the public docket for this investigation. The propeller was returned to the manufacturer, St. Croix Propeller, where it was repaired. According to an October 13, 2015, email from the propeller manufacturer, there was a "fatigue cracked rivet exactly halfway down inside the wood." To repair the propeller, the rivets in the area were "doubled up." The repair was completed in October 2015, and the propeller was reinstalled on the airplane in November 2015.

The photograph of the crack before repair was compared to the fractures found on the propeller postaccident. The fatigue fracture through the leading edge strip intersected the original rivet and the adjacent repair rivet closer to the hub. The fracture in the underlying wood intersected an original rivet hole and the adjacent repair rivet closer to the blade tip.

The builders of the airplane maintained an online blog detailing the airplane's restoration. A search of the blog revealed multiple entries related to the propeller and engine. On May 6, 2013, the builder noted that the propeller that was fabricated for use on the accident airplane was designed for the Hispano-Suiza E engine, and when fitted to the hub for the Hispano-Suiza E2 engine, the thickness of the propeller was about 1/2 inch too thin for the length of the hub. A new hub was subsequently acquired and installed on the accident airplane to accommodate the thinner propeller. According to type certificate data on the FAA website, the Wright Hispano E engine was rated 180 horsepower at 1,800 rpm. In the builder's May 6 blog entry, the builder noted that the Hispano-Suiza E2 engine produced 200 horsepower.

An entry in the builder's blog dated October 14, 2013, documented the first engine run, and the first flight was listed in an entry dated November 29, 2013. In an entry on April 23, 2014, the builder noted that the engine had been running rough with hesitation and backfires for a few seconds when accelerating. This issue was corrected by adjusting the engine idle speed from 350 rpm to 480 rpm. In a November 9, 2014, entry, the builder noted a recent issue with an oil leak that led to an overhaul of the engine, and an entry on July 6, 2015, indicated that the airplane was back in the air after a year.

The airplane was housed in a museum, and according to the builder's blog, the propeller was polished on at least one occasion as noted in the April 23, 2014, entry. The type of polish used was not specified; however, various brands of metal polish can contain oxides of either aluminum or silicon.

According to FAA Advisory Circular 20-37E, Aircraft Propeller Maintenance, "A propeller is one of the most highly stressed components on an aircraft. During normal operation, 10 to 25 tons of centrifugal force pull the blades from the hub while the blades are bending and flexing due to thrust and torque loads and engine, aerodynamic and gyroscopic vibratory loads."

NTSB Identification: ERA17FA050
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, November 17, 2016 in Williamson, GA
Aircraft: CURTISS JN4, registration: N1662
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On November 17, 2016, at 1809 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Curtiss JN4D, N1662, collided with terrain shortly after takeoff from Peach State Airport (GA2), Williamson, Georgia. The airplane was destroyed by impact forces and fire. The airline transport pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as a personal flight. Dusk, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local flight. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

According to a witness, the airplane departed runway 31, appeared to be in a normal climb, and the engine sounded "as it always did." As the airplane passed the runway end markers, about 110 to 120 feet above the ground, he heard a loud backfire, followed by two "pops" that were not as loud. The airplane seemed to hesitate for an instant, then there was silence. He observed the airplane in a left-hand turn. After about 90 degrees of turn, he saw a flicker of flame appear from the forward left side of the fuselage that progressed into a "raging fire," with an audible "whoomp" sound. The fire streamed back over the top and left side of the fuselage for about one-half the length of the airplane. The fire persisted until the airplane disappeared behind a tree line and crashed. The witness immediately called 911. Another witness provided a cell phone photo of the airplane on the takeoff leg, with a visible fire near the forward section of the airplane.

The airplane came to rest, upright, in a grass field at the edge of a wooded area. The accident site was located about 1,060 feet southwest of the departure end of runway 31. There was no lateral wreckage path across the ground and no discernible impact crater. Fire consumed the entire airframe with the exception of the aft fuselage and empennage. Flight control cable continuity was established from the ailerons, elevator, and rudder to the dual cockpit controls.

All structure and components of the airplane were accounted for at the accident site, with the exception of one blade of the wood-laminate engine propeller. A three-foot-long section of one blade, including the sheet copper-covered tip, was missing. The missing blade section was later found in a wooded area, about 380 feet southwest of the departure end of runway 31, and about 670 feet from the main wreckage.

The pilot, seated in the aft cockpit seat, held an airline transport pilot certificate with airplane single-engine, airplane multiengine, and glider ratings. He also held flight instructor and mechanic certificates. He reported 25,200 hours of flight time as on his latest Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) second-class medical certificate, dated June 29, 2016. The pilot-rated passenger, seated in the front cockpit seat, held an airline transport pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, airplane single-engine sea, and airplane multiengine sea ratings. He also held flight and ground instructor certificates. He reported 13,862 hours of flight time as on his latest FAA second-class medical certificate, dated May 12, 2016. He was also employed as an operations safety inspector with the FAA.

The single-engine, bi-wing, fabric–covered airplane incorporated a dual, tandem, open cockpit design with a tricycle landing gear. It was equipped with a Hispano-Suiza E-2 reciprocating engine rated at 180 horsepower. The engine was fitted with a St. Croix wood-laminate fixed-pitch propeller. A total restoration of the airframe and engine was completed in 2013. A condition inspection of the airframe and engine was completed on June 20, 2016. On that date, the aircraft total time was 58.6 hours, and about 10.5 hours were accrued since that inspection.

The propeller assembly was forwarded to the NTSB Materials Laboratory for additional examination.

FAA Inspector Larry Daniel Enlow of Orlando, 68, was killed in a plane crash in Georgia on November 17, 2016. Larry was the beloved son of Lawrence Reuben and Avis Gertrude Enlow of College Park, born on November 26, 1947. He was admired and esteemed throughout the national general aviation community, where his outstanding airmanship, expertise in numerous disciplines and dedicated efforts enabled the Orlando Flight Standards District Office to achieve the highest standards of professional performance. His contributions will have a lasting impact.

Larry attended the University of Florida, served as an officer in the Vietnam War with distinction, and held a General Contractor license. He became Vice President of Hubbard Construction Company, building the foundation of Epcot Center and numerous roads and bridges into the Disney area. His hobby as an aviation instructor and Designated Examiner led him to a second career in the Federal Aviation Administration, overseeing nearly all aspects of the most active aviation training area in the world. It is his wife's professional opinion as a pilot that the FAA will need to activate an entire Air Force Reserve squadron to fulfill his role. In addition, Larry mentored those less experienced around him and came to regard them as "his Pups". He had great admiration for Mr. Ron Alexander, who also died in the accident with him, and who was inducted into the Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame. God must have wanted two Copilots for Himself and took only the best…

Loving husband to Terri Lynam Enlow, Larry was also the adored father of Lara Jennifer Tiberian and Emily Marie Nickley and Grandfather to Emma Grace Tiberian, Alexander Scott Tiberian, Evan Lawrence Nickley and Luca Ryan Nickley. He was cherished by his cousins Darlene Dee Abstein and Allen Eugene Burris, his son-in-law, Adam Scott Tiberian, and his mother-in-law, Nancy Every El-Hajj. His calm presence, patience and his kind, considerate and discerning nature earned him many close, personal friends. Larry was renowned for his personal standard to achieve the highest quality of excellence in any endeavor. He always made himself available to help or perform any project and it seemed there was nothing he could not do! He was -- in every way -- deeply passionate about family, friends, Golden Retrievers, airplanes, cars, champagne, shrimp, paper towels and using the proper tools! Everyone loved him for those qualities and many are deeply wounded by his absence and will treasure his memory for their lifetimes. A terrible loss will linger long for me but it was an honor and privilege to know Larry; as his wife, I was truly blessed and will be grateful always.

A memorial service is scheduled for November 26th, 11:00am, at First United Methodist Church of Orlando, 142 East Jackson Street, Orlando, FL 32801. Donations to a favorite Veterans organization such as Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund (A+ rating from Clark Howard) are requested in lieu of flowers. Thank you to all who are posting.

RONALD RAY ALEXANDER (1942 - 2016)


ALEXANDER, Ronald Ray (Ron) Alexander, age 74, of Griffin passed away November 17, 2016. Ron’s love of flying began at the age of 14 and he received his pilot’s license at the age of 17. After high school and college, he joined the United States Air Force where he served his country in the Vietnam War. The Air Force awarded Ron the Distinguished Flying Cross and two Air Medals. In 1969, he was hired by Delta Air Lines where he worked until retirement in 2002, with 34 years of service as Chief Pilot. Ron was an entrepreneur having owned and operated several businesses since 1979. In March 2004, Ron founded the Candler Field Museum, a non-profit organization. Candler Field is named after the original Atlanta airport. He is survived by his wife, Regina Alexander; daughter Julie Alexander and her husband Eric Lund, and their son Alexander; daughter Jane Smith and her husband Rod Smith, and their children Luke and Grace. Visitation for Mr. Alexander will be Sunday, November 20th from 6-8 P.M. at the Conner- Westbury Funeral Home, 1891 W. McIntosh Rd, Griffin, GA. A celebration of life will be held at a later date at Candler Field in Williamson, GA. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that you please consider making a contribution to the Candler Field Museum, 349 Jonathan Roost Rd, Williamson, GA 30292 or www.peachstateaero.com Please join her family and friends in honoring the life of Ron Alexander by visiting www.conner-westburyfuneralhome.com and posting your tributes and memories. Conner-Westbury Funeral Home, 1891 W. McIntosh Rd., Griffin.



PIKE COUNTY, Ga. - A small plane crash in Pike County killed two people Thursday evening.

“When I got back here, it was all in flames,” said resident Don Rainwater.

Don Rainwater owns several acres of land near the Peach State Airport in Williamson.

The single-engine plane took off from the airport around 5:30 p.m. Thursday, and shortly after takeoff, it crashed on Rainwater’s property. 

He came to see if anyone survived.

“The plane had already burned up, except for the tail section,” Rainwater said.

The crash killed both people on board. Everyone in the small community knows who they are, but officials haven’t released their names yet.

Winston Gray, 7, was riding in a golf cart with his grandmother when the plane took off.

”It took off close to the runway. I saw smoke and then I saw the pokes at the top and I was, like, ‘Fire! Fire!’ I told my grandma to call 911,” Gray said.

Rainwater thinks it’s a miracle that the plane crash didn’t cause a huge fire on his property.

“They said he had very little fuel on the plane. That's the reason there wasn't more fire than it was. If he had a full tank of fuel, all this would've been burned up because it would've scattered the fuel everywhere,” Rainwater said.

Story and video:   http://www.wsbtv.com


WILLIAMSON, Ga. -- Officials have confirmed a plane crash in middle Georgia has caused two deaths.

The crash happened about a quarter mile off of the runway at Peach State Airport in Williamson, Ga. around 7 p.m.

That's where, according to the Federal Aviation Administration, an experimental Curtiss JN4D Jenny crashed on departure.

The FAA and the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) are both on the scene investigating.

Pike County Coroner Terrell Moody confirmed the deaths to 11Alive late Thursday and that their bodies were being taken to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation Medical Examiner's Office in DeKalb County for positive identification.

As such, the names of the victims have not been officially released.

Story and video:   http://www.11alive.com

Candler Field principal Ron Alexander and an unidentified Federal Aviation Administration official were killed Thursday evening in a small plane crash near the airport in Williamson.

The plane, a Curtiss JN4D Jenny, burst into flames upon impact. 

First responders rushed to the scene but could not save the two onboard.

The plane experienced trouble on takeoff.

It appeared the pilot tried to put it down in a pasture but it crashed into a wooded area.

Source:   http://www.barnesville.com

Around 5:30 Thursday evening units from the Pike County Sheriff's Department, Pike County Fire Department all responded to Candler Field in Williamson to a single engine plane crash. 

Witnesses stated to WKEU news that the aircraft appeared to be on fire right before impact. 

The Curtiss JN4D Jenny was being flown by Candler Field Museum and Barnstormer’s Grill owner Ron Alexander, and another passenger was also on board at the time of the accident.

Source:   http://wkeuradio.com

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