Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Cessna 172K Skyhawk, 696 Corp, N46377: Accident occurred October 04, 2016 near Westosha Airport (5K6), Kenosha County, Wisconsin

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Aviation Accident Final Report  -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary  -  National Transportation Safety Board:   https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN17LA006
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 04, 2016 in Wilmot, WI
Probable Cause Approval Date: 01/18/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 172K, registration: N46377
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot stated that the engine experienced a partial loss of power shortly after takeoff on the local flight. In an effort to regain power, the pilot switched fuel tanks, applied carburetor heat, and richened the fuel mixture, but the engine continued to operate at reduced power. The pilot attempted to land at a nearby airport; however, he overshot the runway and decided to perform a forced landing to an adjacent cornfield. During the landing, the right wing impacted the corn, and the airplane came to rest upright.
Partial disassembly of the engine revealed a failure of the No. 1 piston pin plug due to corrosion in the No. 1 cylinder barrel. The plug failure resulted in significant oil contamination and subsequent oil starvation and damage to the crankshaft connecting rod bearings. The damage to the bearings resulted in the partial loss of engine power.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
A failure of the No. 1 piston pin plug due to corrosion in the cylinder barrel, which resulted in oil contamination, oil starvation to the crankshaft connecting rod bearings, and a subsequent partial loss of engine power.

On October 4, 2016, at 1511 central daylight time, a Cessna 172K single-engine airplane, N46377, impacted a cornfield during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power while maneuvering near Wilmot, Wisconsin. The private pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. The airplane was registered to 696 Corp, Grayslake, Illinois, and operated by a private individual as a Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed the Burlington Municipal Airport (BUU), Burlington, Wisconsin, about 1445.

According to the pilot, while maneuvering after takeoff from BUU, the engine began to lose power. The pilot then switched fuel tanks, applied carburetor heat, full rich mixture, but the engine remained at reduced power. The pilot attempted to land at Westosha Airport, Wilmot, Wisconsin, however, he overshot the runway. The pilot then decided to execute a forced landing to an adjacent cornfield. During the forced landing, the right wing impacted the corn, and the airplane came to rest upright. 

The accident engine was a 150-horsepower, four cylinder, Lycoming O-320-E2D engine, serial number L-22806-27A. It was examined at the facilities of Myers Aviation, Oshkosh, Wisconsin, under the supervision of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator and inspectors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Visual examination of engine exterior and components revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The engine oil filter was removed and disassembled. The internal filter displayed heavy deposits of metal material. Due to the metal deposits in the oil filter, the engine was disassembled. Partial disassembly of the engine revealed the number 1 cylinder piston pin plug was destroyed and metal debris was noted in the engine oil and engine oil filter. The engine crankshaft and connecting rods displayed discoloration and heat signatures consistent with oil starvation. The number 3 and 4 connecting rod bearings were extruded and melted from the rod journals. The cylinder bores displayed corrosion and discoloration on their respective inner surfaces.

According to the engine records, the engine underwent its most recent annual inspection on October 1, 2015, at a total time of 3,160 hours, and 1,176 hours since major overhaul. At the time of the accident, the engine had accumulated 34 hours since its inspection.

696 CORP:   http://registry.faa.gov/N46377

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Milwaukee FSDO-13


NTSB Identification: CEN17LA006
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 04, 2016 in Wilmot, WI
Aircraft: CESSNA 172K, registration: N46377
Injuries: 1 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 4, 2016, at 1511 central daylight time, a Cessna 172K single-engine airplane, N46377, impacted a cornfield during a forced landing following a partial loss of engine power while maneuvering near Wilmot, Wisconsin. The commercial pilot, who was the sole occupant, was not injured, and the airplane sustained substantial damage to the right wing. The airplane was registered to 696 Corp, Grayslake, Illinois, and operated by a private individual as a Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident and a flight plan was not filed. The flight departed the Burlington Municipal Airport (BUU), Burlington, Wisconsin, about 1450.

According to the pilot, while maneuvering after takeoff from BUU, the engine began to lose power. The pilot then switched fuel tanks, applied carburetor heat, full rich mixture, but the engine remained at low power. The pilot attempted to land at Westosha Airport, Wilmot, Wisconsin, however, he overshot the runway. The pilot then decided to execute a forced landing to an adjacent cornfield. During the forced landing, the right wing impacted the corn, and the airplane came to rest upright.






KENOSHA COUNTY — A plane went down Tuesday, October 4th near the intersection of Highway C and Highway KD in the Town of Randall in Kenosha County.

The call for this incident came in shortly after 3:00 p.m.

A preliminary investigation has revealed the pilot on board wasn’t hurt.

The plane apparently experienced engine problems, and the pilot had to make somewhat of an emergency landing in a field in the area.

The plane was en route to Chicago Executive Airport from an airport in Burlington when the engine problems occurred.

The pilot attempted to land at the Westosha Airport but was unable to do so.

The plane is a Cessna 172 manufactured in 1969 per the 72-year-old pilot from Grayslake Illinois. The plane suffered moderate damage.

The FAA will be investigating this incident.

Source:  http://fox6now.com




TOWN OF RANDALL -- A pilot is OK after his plane went down in Kenosha County Tuesday afternoon.

The crash happened at approximately 3 p.m. in a cornfield near Hwy KD and Hwy CK in the Town of Randall.

The Kenosha County Sheriff’s Department said the plane took off from Burlington and was heading to Chicago Executive Airport when it started experiencing engine problems.  

Officials said the pilot, a 72-year-old man from Grayslake, Ill., attempted to land at the Westosha Airport but was unable to and landed in the field.

The pilot was not injured and the plane only had moderate damage.

Source:  http://www.tmj4.com

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