Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Beechcraft D95A Travel Air, N76S, operated by Bay Area Flying Club: Fatal accident occurred October 04, 2016 in Hitchcock, Galveston County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Houston, Texas
Textron Aviation; Wichita, Kansas
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania
Hartzell Propeller Inc; Piqua, Ohio

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N76S

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA005
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 04, 2016 in Hitchcock, TX
Aircraft: BEECH D95A, registration: N76S
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On October 4, 2016, at 1826 central daylight time, a Beech D95A airplane, N76S, was destroyed after impacting trees and terrain near Hitchcock, Texas. The flight instructor was fatally injured and the pilot receiving instruction was seriously injured. The instructional flight was operated by Bay Area Flying Club, Pearland, Texas, under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the local flight, which originated from Pearland Regional Airport (KLVJ), Pearland, Texas.

According to the pilot's brother who spoke with the pilot in the hospital following the accident, the purpose of the flight was for the flight instructor to demonstrate aerodynamic stalls. The pilot said that a stall was initiated from about 4,000 ft mean sea level (msl). The pilot then vaguely remembered the instructor "cursing" the airplane because the flight instructor was unable to recover from the stall maneuver. The pilot was unable to recall any further details of the accident.

A duck hunter, located about 1 mile south of the accident site, took a cell phone video that captured the airplane descending in a fully-developed right spin. 

According to data retrieved from an onboard GPS unit, the airplane entered a cliumb from about 4,000 ft at 1825:23, reaching a peak altitude of about 4,800 ft about 1825:50. The airplane then entered a descent that continued until the end of the recorded data at 1826:44.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Flight Instructor

The flight instructor held an airline transport pilot certificate with an airplane multiengine land rating, and commercial privileges with airplane single-engine land, and glider ratings. He also held a flight instructor certificate with airplane single-engine, multiengine, glider, and instrument ratings. His most recent second-class Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) medical certificate, dated September 2, 2015, contained the restriction, "Must wear corrective lenses."

According to the flight instructor's logbooks, he had accumulated 9,898 total hours of flight experience, of which 4,635 hours were in multiengine airplanes, 16 of the multiengine airplane hours were logged in the previous 11 years. He had logged 11.6 total hours in the accident airplane make and model, all within the previous two months, of which 6.7 hours were as a flight instructor. His logbooks indicated that he had never practice stalls in the accident airplane make and model.

Pilot Receiving Instruction

The pilot receiving instruction held a private pilot certificate with an airplane single-engine land rating. His third-class FAA medical certificate, dated September 2, 2014, contained no restrictions or limitations.

According to the pilot's logbook, he had acquired 113.7 total flight hours, of which 110.3 hours were in single-engine airplanes. The remaining 3.4 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane, serial number TD-605, was manufactured by the Beech Aircraft Corporation in 1965. It was powered by two Lycoming IO-360-B1B engines, serial numbers RL-29744-51A (left) and RL-28158-51A (right), each rated at 180 horsepower, and driving Hartzell HC-92WK-2B two-blade, all-metal, constant-speed propellers.

The left engine and propeller were overhauled on February 28, 2014, due to a propeller strike. It had accumulated 2,672.1 total hours (1,042.7 hours since the previous major overhaul). According to the maintenance records, the airframe, both engines, and both propellers received a 100-hour/annual inspection on August 1, 2016. The tachometer read 2,696.1 hours, and the airframe has accumulated 4,085.2 hours at the time of the inspection. At the time of the 100-hour/annual inspection,

the left engine had accrued 2,696.1 total hours (1,066.9 hours since major overhaul).
the left propeller had accrued 4,085.2 total hours (24.0 hours since major overhaul)
the right engine had accumulated 700.7 since being factory-remanufactured on July 25, 2003, and
the right propeller had accrued 4,085.2 total hours, and 329.2 hours since major overhaul.

The last altimeter, transponder, encoder, and static system checks were made on August 12, 2014.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1752, Scholes International Airport (KGLS), Galveston, Texas, Automated Surface Observation System, about 11 miles east of the accident site, reported wind from 110° at 11 knots, visibility, 10 miles, scattered clouds at 2,300 ft, temperature, 28° C., dew point, 24° C., and an altimeter setting of 29.79 inches of mercury. Data from the U. S. Naval Observatory showed that sunset occurred at 1902 and the end of evening nautical twilight occurred at 1925.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane impacted a tree-lined canal next to a fallow rice field in a slightly wings-level, nose-down attitude. The aircraft wreckage was recovered and transported to Air Salvage of Dallas, Lancaster, Texas, where examinations were conducted. No pre-existing discrepancies or anomalies were noted with the airframe or either engine, and nothing was found that would have precluded the engines from developing power. The bottoms of both propeller spinners were flattened.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Galveston County Medical Examiner, Texas City, Texas, conducted an autopsy on the flight instructor. The cause of the pilot's death was listed as blunt force injuries.

FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing. Testing was negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. Metoprolol was detected in urine and subclavian blood. According to FAA's Forensic Toxicology Drug website, metoprolol Is a "beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, 'beta blocker,' used in the treatment of hypertension and certain arrhythmias."

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Following a series of fatal accidents in Beech Baron- and Travel Air-series airplanes, the National Transportation Safety Board issued Safety Recommendations A-81-49 through -53 on May 7, 1981, because of the propensity of these airplanes to enter flat spins under conditions of high asymmetric power and low speed. Training for a potential emergency, such as an engine-out condition, "may be more hazardous than the emergency itself." In 1974, the U.S. Army issued a report on the stall characteristics of the Beech T-42A, which is similar to the B55B and D95A airplanes.

Section 3, page 6, of the Beech D95A Owner's Manual states: "This is a normal category airplane. Maneuvers, including spins, are prohibited."

Section 4, page 9, states: "If a spin is entered inadvertently, cut the power on both engines. Apply full rudder opposite the direction of rotation and then move the elevator forward until rotation stops. When the controls are fully effective, bring the nose up smoothly to a level flight attitude. Don't pull out too abruptly."

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA005
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, October 04, 2016 in Dickinson, TX
Aircraft: BEECH D95A, registration: N76S
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 4, 2016, about 1827 central daylight time, a Beechcraft D95A "Travel Air", multi-engine airplane, N76S, was substantially damaged after impacting trees and terrain while maneuvering near Dickinson, Texas. The flight instructor was fatally injured and the pilot receiving instruction was seriously injured. The airplane was registered to a private individual, and was operated by Bay Area Flying Club; Pearland, Texas; as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions (VMC) prevailed and a visual flight rules (VFR) flight plan had not been filed. The airplane had departed from Pearland Regional Airport (KLVJ), Pearland, Texas, for the local flight.

The airplane was maneuvering about 4,800 feet above ground level (agl) when it slowed and began descending rapidly. A witness about one-mile south took a cell-phone video which showed the airplane descending rapidly in a fully developed spin. The airplane did not recover from the spin and impacted an abandoned tree-lined canal next to a fallow rice field in a remote area. The witness and the pilot who survived both called 9-1-1 emergency.


At 1752 the KGLS Automated Surface Observation System at Galveston, Texas, about 11 miles east from the accident location, reported wind from 110 degrees at 11 knots, visibility 10 miles, scattered clouds at 2,300 feet, temperature 28 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 24 degrees C, with an altimeter setting of 29.79 inches of mercury. Data from the U. S. Naval Observatory showed that sunset occurred at 1902 and the end of evening nautical twilight occurred at 1925.



HITCHCOCK, TX (KTRK) -- A 911 call released from a deadly small plane crash in Hitchcock shows the survivor speaking extremely calmly to dispatchers.

The Beechcraft D95A Travel Air crashed Tuesday night near FM 2004 and FM Road 646.

Brian Arnott, 69, was killed. Bacel Nseir, 38, suffered serious injuries and was taken to UTMB Hospital in Galveston. He's now out of intensive care, but remains hospitalized.

The NTSB is still investigating the cause of the crash.

Story and video:  http://abc13.com







HITCHCOCK, Texas - Federal investigators started their work on Wednesday to determine what caused a deadly plane crash in Hitchcock.

The Department of Public Safety said Brian Arnott, 69, from the Pasadena area was killed.

The plane went down near the intersection of FM 2004 and FM 646 Tuesday night.

A National Transportation Safety Board investigator said there wasn't a distress call before the crash, but a 38-year-old man who survived managed to get help.

"After the crash, the surviving person called on his cell phone to 911 emergency and gave directions and they came and picked him up and took him to the hospital,” said Tom Latson, an NTSB Air Safety Investigator.

The survivor was in critical condition Wednesday.

Investigators with DPS believed the two men, who were both pilots, departed from the Pearland Regional Airport. It was unclear where they were headed.

A friend of the men on-board the aircraft told KPRC he believes they were on a scheduled training flight. The man said both were pilots, however, one of the men had far more flying hours in this particular aircraft than the other.

“It was beautiful weather yesterday and there is no requirement for pilots in this airspace to have a flight plan or be followed by air traffic control,” said Latson.

The owner of the Beechcraft D95A Travel Air said here weren't any previous mechanical issues.

The NTSB will determine if that could've happened Tuesday.

“What I plan to do now is document the scene, document the ground scars, the wreckage that I have there and probably remove as many electronic components containing non-volatile memory that I can,” said Latson.

Arnott was a longtime member of the Bay Area Aero Club. The president of the club said its members were saddened by his loss.

Friends said Arnott was a “very experienced pilot” and was well respected by many.

The NTSB was expected to release its initial report next week. The entire investigation could take up to a year.

Source:   http://www.click2houston.com




GALVESTON COUNTY, Texas – A Pasadena mans was killed and a Houston man was injured in a small plane crashed in Hitchcock on Tuesday night. 

According to the Department of Public Safety, at least two people were on board.

The man killed in the crash has been identified as Brian Arnott, of Pasadena, according to DPS. The second individual is a man from the Houston area. He was airlifted to UTMB Galveston.

The crash occurred at the intersection of FM 2004 and FM 646. 

Both men were pilots, so investigators have not confirmed yet which one was operating the plane.



GALVESTON COUNTY (KTRK) -- One person is dead after a small plane crash in Hitchcock Tuesday night.

Authorities were called to the area near FM 2004 and FM Road 646 just after 6:50pm, investigators said.

Another person on board the plane was removed by emergency officials. He was transported to the hospital by Life Flight.

"At this time we are trying to put all the pieces together," DPS Sgt. Stephen Woodard said.

DPS officials believe the plane took off from Pearland Regional Airport.

Source:   http://abc13.com





Authorities have identified a man who died Tuesday night in a plane crash in Galveston County that left another man critically injured.

DPS Sgt. Stephen Woodard identified the victim as 71-year-old Brian Arnott, of the Pasadena area, who died at the scene. Woodard said a 48-year-old man, of Houston, was in critical condition at UTMB Galveston.

The Beechcraft D95A Travel Air went down about 7 p.m. in an isolated area near FM 2004 and FM 646 in Hitchcock, said officials with the Texas Department of Public Safety.

Woodard said both men on board the plane were licensed pilots. It wasn't immediately clear who had control of the aircraft at the time of the crash.
Woodard said it was unclear  from where the men had taken off or where they were headed.

According to FAA records, the airplane is owned by a person who lives in Alvin. But DPS officials said the registered owner was not on board. The FAA is investigating the incident to determine what caused the crash.

Source:   http://www.chron.com

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