Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Jihlavan KP–5 ASA, N440JM: Fatal accident occurred May 24, 2016 in Rhoadesville, Orange County, Virginia

http://registry.faa.gov/N440JM

FAA Flight Standards District Office: FAA Washington FSDO-27

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA194
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 24, 2016 in Rhoadesville, VA
Aircraft: JIHLAVAN AIRPLANES SRO KP 5 ASA, registration: N440JM
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 24, 2016, about 1625 eastern daylight time, an experimental light sport Jihlavan KP 5 ASA (Skyleader 500), N440JM, was destroyed when it impacted terrain in Rhoadesville, Virginia. The sport pilot/owner and the flight instructor were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan had been filed for the local flight from Culpeper Regional Airport (CJR), Culpeper, Virginia. The instructional flight was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to a friend of the sport pilot/owner, he had recently purchased the airplane, and had it ferried from California to CJR. The sport pilot was required by his insurance company to have 4 hours of dual operation before being able to fly the airplane solo. CJR records indicated that the airplane arrived on May 13, 2016, and the sport pilot's logbook indicated that he had flown the airplane twice on May 20, 2016, for a total of 2.5 hours, with "dual received" flight time noted for both flights. 

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) sources, no air traffic control services were provided. However, radar returns indicated that after departing CJR about 1530, the airplane headed southwest to Orange County Airport (OMH), Orange, Virginia. There, radar indications disappeared and reappeared four times, consistent with approaches below radar coverage to runway 26. After the fourth approach, the airplane proceeded northeast, and later turned east before disappearing from radar. There were no altitude readouts from the airplane during the entire flight.

According to several witnesses near the accident site, they heard what sounded like thunder or a "crack." They then saw a parachute deployment and the airplane nosed straight down before impacting the ground. Witnesses could not determine the airplane's altitude at the time other than it was low, or whether the engine was operating. 

The wreckage was located on open terrain in the vicinity of 38 degrees 15.917 minutes north latitude, 077 degrees, 51.465 minutes west longitude, at an elevation of about 400 feet. The airplane was found upside down and complete, with the exception of some smaller pieces in close proximity. When the airplane was righted, significant fore-to-aft crushing damage was noted to the nose section and to both wings. 

The airplane was subsequently moved to a temporary storage facility where it was laid out and the presence of all flight control surfaces was confirmed, as was control continuity from the each flight control surface to the cockpit controls. 

The airplane was equipped with a ballistic parachute system. The ballistic parachute system included a fabric canopy attached to the airframe via four metal-wire risers. Two of the risers were individually attached to the airframe via their respective anchors, while the other two risers were together attached to a third airframe anchor. A drogue parachute assisted in main parachute deployment.

At the accident scene, the drogue parachute was found in a nearby field and the main parachute was found in trees about 100 yards east of the wreckage. At the temporary storage facility, the parachute's fabric canopy was spread out and observed to be undamaged. The two individual risers were found to be separated near their respective airframe anchors with the wire ends broomstrawed, consistent with overload separation. The other two risers were found still attached to their single anchor; however, that anchor was itself separated from the airframe. The cockpit parachute activation handle appeared pulled (system was activated.)

The airplane was subsequently moved to a long-term aircraft storage facility. 

Due to the extent of observed damage and heavy mud impaction, the engine was not examined at the temporary facility but will be at the long-term facility. 

There were no dedicated recording devices onboard the airplane; however, there were some avionics that could have retained non-volatile data. The heavily damaged avionics were removed, and data downloads will be attempted.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov,  and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


 John Joseph Quinn Jr.



CULPEPER, Va. (WVIR) -

The Culpeper community is mourning the loss of a longtime airline pilot killed in the crash of a small plane in Orange County.

Virginia State Police identified 57-year-old Charles Neal Caldwell of Apopka, Florida, as the pilot and 81-year-old John Joseph “JJ” Quinn Jr. as his passenger.

Authorities say Caldwell had ties to Madison County.

Records from the Federal Aviation Administration show Caldwell was licensed since 2010 to fly sport planes, like the one that crashed Tuesday, May 24.

Officials say Quinn, an instructor with White Hawk Aviation, and Caldwell took off from Culpeper Regional Airport about an hour before the crash at the intersection of Tinder Lane and Ridge Field Lane in Orange County.

They say Caldwell had owned the Czech-made Jihlavan KP 5 ASA for about a week. The fixed-wing, single-engine aircraft was classified as experimental.

Quinn was Paul Vesely's flight instructor for the past ten years. He describes the professional pilot as calm, but direct.

“He was just so comfortable in what he did and his method of instruction that it made you feel comfortable behind the controls,” Vesely said.

Vesely says Quinn's death is a terrible loss to the aviation community.

Quinn built the original hangars at Culpeper Regional Airport with his own money to try to attract more business to the airport

“He was always trying to get people to the airport. I mean, he was the best ambassador we've ever had here,” said Culpeper Regional Airport Operations Manager Neil Milofsky.

He retired in the early 1990s after more than 30 years flying for United Airlines.

“JJ just had this way about him. He would bring people in and make them feel at home. Even if you didn't care anything for aviation, you did after you spoke with JJ for a little while,” said Culpeper Regional Airport General Manager Tanya Woodward.

The Virginia State Police along with the Medical Examiner’s Office, FAA, and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating the cause of the crash.

Officials in Culpeper say Quinn radioed in to the Orange County Airport before the crash and was his usual upbeat, friendly self.

Press Release from the Virginia State Police:

ORANGE COUNTY - At 4:31 p.m. Tuesday (May 24, 2016), Virginia State Police were notified of a plane crash in the 1,000 block of Tinder Lane in Orange County.

The plane was a 2007 Jihlavan KP 5 ASA, fixed-wing,single-engine aircraft, and was classified as experimental.

The crash location was at the at the intersection of Tinder Lane and Ridge Field Lane (both are private roads) located in a rural section of Orange County near Mine Run.

There were two confirmed fatalities: the pilot, Charles Neal Caldwell, 57, of Apopka, Fla., and passenger as John Joseph Quinn Jr., 81, of Culpeper, Va.

The Virginia State Police along with the Medical Examiner’s Office, NTSB and FAA are investigating the incident to determine the causative factors that lead to the crash.


http://www.nbc29.com

A 2011 photo of White Hawk Flight Training instructor J.J. Quinn, left, at the Culpeper County Airport and one of his many students, Bennett Miller. Quinn, 81, was the passenger in a fatal plane crash Tuesday in Orange County.



A Madison pilot with a newly bought plane was logging instruction time with a veteran flier from Culpeper when the aircraft crashed in Orange County this week, killing both, officials said.

Virginia State Police identified the victims as Charles Neal Caldwell, 57, of Apopka, Fla., and John Joseph Quinn Jr., 81, of Culpeper. But Caldwell had been living in Madison since March, according to records and the Post Office there.

Culpeper Regional Airport Manager Tanya Woodward said the yellow and blue Skyleader 500 plane had been based at that airport for the last several weeks.

Woodward said Caldwell had recently purchased the plane and needed to complete some flight time with an instructor pilot before flying on his own. With the recent run of bad weather, Tuesday was the first chance he had to fly with Quinn, a highly experienced pilot with more than 32,000 flight hours.

Quinn had been a military instructor pilot during the Vietnam War era before going to work with United Airlines.

He also volunteered with Angel Flight Mid-Atlantic, a nonprofit organization that provides medical air transport for patients who could not otherwise afford it, the Culpeper Star-Exponent reported. The National Aeronautics Association in 2014 named him the distinguished volunteer pilot of the year.

“We should all aspire to be like that in our eighties,” Woodward said. 

His association with Culpeper Regional Airport began in the early 1980s. He built a 90-unit T hangar at the airport using his own money, selling it to the county about 10 years ago.

Quinn founded the Culpeper Air Squadron, helped with the Culpeper AirFest and was helped start Whitehawk Aviation, which services planes at the airport.

“We consider him our founding father,” Woodward said.

Culpeper attorney and flying enthusiast Bob Yeaman called Quinn “a good person with a heart of gold.” Yeaman said Quinn checked both him and his son, Robbie, out about a year ago for recertification purposes.

“He was a kindly man,” Yeaman said. “Instead of telling you that you were doing something wrong, he would say something like, ‘Maybe there’s a better way to do that.’”

The plane had just been delivered to Culpeper last week. The Skyleader 500 is later version of the 2007 Jihlavan KP5 ASA, a Czech-built two-seat metal aircraft certified by the FAA as experimental and a light sport aircraft but sharing the same FAA type identification.

The Skyleader 500 is later version of the 2007 Jihlavan KP5 ASA, a Czech-built two-seat metal aircraft certified by the FAA as experimental and a light sport aircraft but sharing the same FAA type identification.
Light sport aircraft fall between ultralight and other light aircraft in the FAA certification range. Aimed primarily at recreational flying, they are limited to no more than 1,320 pounds in weight, seat no more than two (pilot and passenger) and have a maximum airspeed of 138 mph.

Flying a light sport aircraft requires only a sport pilot license, not a private pilot license. A sport pilot must have a minimum of 20 hours of in-flight training, but is not required to undergo a full FAA physical exam to prove medical eligibility. Sport pilots are not allowed to fly at night, in clouds or inclement weather, and are required to fly at altitudes below 10,000 feet.

A private pilot license requires at least 40 hours in-flight training, including at least 20 hours of dual instruction and 10 hours of solo flying. The student pilot is also required to complete an FAA medical examination.
The FAA‘s Airman Certification Branch confirmed that Caldwell held only a sport pilot license.

The crash occurred shortly before 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, near the intersection of Tinder Lane and Ridge Field Lane, off Mine Run Road in rural Orange County, approximately 10 miles east of the Orange County airport.
The aircraft wreckage had been cleared from the Tinder Lane site by Wednesday morning, according to state police Sgt. Les Tyler.

The NTSB is leading the investigation into the crash, and lead investigator Paul Cox of the NTSB’s eastern region said he expects to issue a preliminary report on the accident in about 10 days. That report will be available on the NTSB.gov website.

A factual report and findings of probable cause and analysis of the accident should be available in eight months or more after that.

Original article can be found here: http://www.fredericksburg.com

Beloved Culpeper pilot J.J. Quinn, Jr., right, accepted a check in December for Angel Flight, a volunteer organization for which he provided hundreds of flights for the ill. He tragically died Tuesday as a passenger in a plane crash in Orange County.


An experienced and celebrated Culpeper pilot who spent the past two decades providing volunteer flights for the seriously ill tragically died Tuesday in a plane crash in Orange County.

John Joseph Quinn, Jr., known to friends as “J.J.,” was the passenger in a 2007 Jihlavan KP 5 ASA fixed-wing, single-engine experimental aircraft that crashed near Mine Run at the intersection of Tinder and Ridge Field lanes after 4 p.m. in a rural section of the county. The pilot, Charles Neal Caldwell, 57, of Apopka, Florida, also died.

Quinn was 81, and spent 30 years flying for United Airlines before volunteering his time and expertise with Angel Flight Mid-Atlantic, a nonprofit organization that provides medical air transport for patients who otherwise could not afford it.

Quinn – recently interviewed by the Star-Exponent for its Hometown Heroes magazine – started taking flying lessons at age 15 at the Culpeper airport.

Asked about his hundreds of volunteer trips with Angel Flight, he said, “I just love to fly and I love to fly the airways and what better way to do that than this. There’s a whole world that needs our services.”

Quinn was a U.S. Navy veteran who flew Neptune P2V anti-submarine patrol aircraft and an aviation instructor.  The National Aeronautics Association in 2014 named him the distinguished volunteer pilot of the year.

The Virginia State Police along with the Medical Examiner’s Office, NTSB and FAA are investigating the incident to determine the causative factors that lead to Tuesday’s plane crash in which Quinn was killed.

Senior Air Safety Investigator Paul Cox, of the NTSB’s eastern region, arrived on the scene just after 8 p.m.

“The first thing we are going to do is collect perishable information—the information that is going to change once the aircraft is moved. We will probably spend a day or two on scene before the aircraft is removed,” he said.

Cox said he expects to produce a preliminary accident report about 10 days after that, and it will be available on the NTSB.gov website. A factual report should be released six to eight months after that, he said, followed in two to three more months by a headquarters NTSB finding of probable cause and an analysis of the accident.


Original article can be found here: http://www.dailyprogress.com




ORANGE, Va. — Virginia State Police officials have identified the two victims of a plane crash in Orange County as men from Florida and Culpeper.

According to a state police news release Wednesday morning, the men killed were the pilot, Charles Neal Caldwell, 57, of Apopka, Fla., and a passenger, John Joseph Quinn Jr., 81, of Culpeper.

The release said the plane was a 2007 Jihlavan KP 5 ASA, fixed-wing, single-engine aircraft, and was classified as experimental.

The Virginia State Police along with the Medical Examiner’s Office, National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration are investigating to determine the cause of the crash.

State police received a report at 4:31 p.m. Tuesday that the single-engine, fixed-wing plane had crashed in the 10,000 block of Tinder Lane, near the intersection with Ridge Field Lane, in the Rhoadesville area. The crash site is approximately 10 miles from the Orange County Airport.

Sue Marsee, who has lived on Mine Run Road next to Tinder Lane for nearly 16 years, heard the crash.

“It was the biggest crash,” she said. “Metal is what I heard. I thought it was a big truck.”

Another neighbor, who also heard the crash, said it sounded like the plane “just fell from the sky.”

Able to drive to the scene before the lane was cordoned off, she reported the plane was blue and yellow in color.

Senior Air Safety Investigator Paul Cox, of the NTSB’s eastern region, arrived on the scene just after 8 p.m.

“The first thing we are going to do is collect perishable information—the information that is going to change once the aircraft is moved. We will probably spend a day or two on scene before the aircraft is removed,” he said.

Cox said he expects to produce a preliminary accident report about 10 days after that, and it will be available on the NTSB.gov website. A factual report should be released six to eight months after that, he said, followed in two to three more months by a headquarters NTSB finding of probable cause and an analysis of the accident.


Original article can be found here: http://www.richmond.com






ORANGE COUNTY, Va. – Virginia State Police confirm two people are dead after a plane crash in Orange County late Tuesday afternoon.

Police said the small plane crashed in the roadway along the 10000 block of Tinder Ln., near Mine Run.

Reports of the crash came in around 4:30 p.m. State police are on scene investigating the crash. The FAA and NTSB have been notified.

The FAA has identified the aircraft as an Jihlavan Airplanes SRO-KP5, according to NBC29. State Police said the plane is a fixed-wing, single-engine aircraft.

State police are working to confirm the identification of the victims and notifying next of kin.

Original article can be found here:  http://wtvr.com


RHOADESVILLE, Va. - Virginia State Police said two people have died after a small plane crash in Orange County.

Police said a small fixed-wing, single-engine aircraft crashing in the roadway at the intersection of Tinder Lane and Ridge Field Lane in Rhoadesville at around 4:31 p.m. Tuesday.

  
Virginia State Police said troopers are investigating the scene. 

The Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board have been notified about the crash.



Original article can be found here: http://www.fox5dc.com




ORANGE Co., Va. (ABC7) — A small airplane crashed into the roadway at the intersection of Tinder Lane and Ridge Field Lane in Orange County, Va., around 4:31 p.m. Tuesday, Virginia State Police said.

VSP said the plane was a small, fixed-wing, single-engine aircraft.

There were reportedly two people on board the aircraft, and VSP confirmed that both of them died in the crash.

Police said the FAA and NTSB had both been notified of the accident.

Police also said they are still working to confirm the identities of the deceased and notifying next of kin.

Original article can be found here:  http://wjla.com








RHOADESVILLE, Va. (AP) - Virginia State Police say a two people have died in a small plane crash on a road in Orange County.


Spokeswoman Corinne Geller said in an email that the aircraft crashed on Tinder Lane and Ridge Field Lane in Rhoadesville about 4:30 p.m. Tuesday.


Geller said there are two confirmed fatalities. She described the plane as fixed-wing, single-engine aircraft.


Troopers are working to confirm the identities of the two victims. Geller says federal aviation agencies have been notified. 


The location is about 15 miles away from the Orange County Airport.

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