Saturday, July 4, 2015

Cessna 172P Skyhawk, Fox Flying Club Inc., N62681: Fatal accident occurred July 03, 2015 in Bartlett, Illinois

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf 

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Docket And Docket Items:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board  -  Aviation Accident Data Summary: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA289
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 03, 2015 in Bartlett, IL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/14/2016
Aircraft: CESSNA 172P, registration: N62681
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The private pilot was returning from a short cross-country flight. He radioed the tower controller and reported inbound; however, he stated that he had a problem with the rudder and he wanted to "play" with it a bit. The pilot declined any assistance from the controller. About 1 1/2 minutes later, the airplane disappeared from radar, and the pilot did not respond to radio calls. The wreckage was located about 5 miles northeast of the airport in a vacant field. The airframe and rudder controls were partially fragmented on impact. The examination of the rudder controls and wreckage did not reveal any preimpact abnormities. 

During the investigation, it was noted that the pilot wore an orthopedic-type shoe with an extended spring-like heel. Due to the fragmentation of the rudder controls, the investigation was unable to determine if an object, such as the pilot's shoe, became wedged under or between the rudder pedals, which could have led the pilot to become distracted. Although diphenhydramine, a potentially impairing medication, was detected during toxicological testing, it could not be determined what effect, if any, this had on the pilot’s ability to control the airplane.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The pilot’s loss of airplane control for reasons that could not be determined because an examination of the airplane did not reveal any preimpact abnormalities. 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On July 3, 2015, about 1545 central daylight time, a Cessna 172 airplane, N62681, impacted terrain near Bartlett, Illinois. The airplane was destroyed and the private rated pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Fox Flying Club, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the DuPage Airport, (DPA), West Chicago, Illinois about 1510.

The pilot was a member of the flying club, which owned the airplane. It was reported that the flight departed DPA on a flight to the Schaumburg Regional Airport (06C), located about 8 miles northeast of DPA. During the inbound flight back to DPA, the pilot contacted the tower and reported that he had a problem with the rudder. The pilot declined any assistance. Shortly thereafter, the airplane disappeared from radar, and the pilot did not respond to further radio calls. Authorities located the accident site in a vacant field, in a forest preserve area.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with rating for airplane single-engine land. The pilot held a third class medical certificate that was issued on July 2, 2015, with the restriction; "must have available glasses for near vision". The medical certificate listed the pilot as 255 lbs., and a height of 69 inches. The pilot reported on his application for a medical certificate that he had 225 total flight hours, with 5 hours in the last six months.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Cessna 172 is a high-wing, single-engine airplane with fixed-tricycle landing gear. The airplane was powered by a four cylinder Lycoming O-320 reciprocating engine and a fixed-pitch propeller. A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed the last annual inspection was completed on March 2, 2015, with an airframe time of 9,800.9 hours, and a tachometer reading of 3,315 hours.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1552, the automated weather observation facility located at the DuPage airport, about 5 miles from the accident site recorded: wind from 300 degrees at 5 knots, 10 miles visibility, few clouds at 5,000 ft., temperature 79 degrees Fahrenheit (F), dew point 55 F, and a barometric pressure of 29.93 inches of mercury.

COMMUNICATIONS and RADAR INFORMATION

The Schaumburg Regional Airport is a non-towered airport, which utilizes a CTAF (Common Traffic Advisory Frequency) for pilot communications. The DuPage airport has an operating control tower; pilots in DuPage's airspace would communicate with the tower controller. After departing Schaumburg, the accident pilot contacted the DuPage tower controller and reported inbound; he also reported that he had a problem with the rudder, and wanted to stay out for a minute. The controller asked if he needed any assistance. The pilot stated that he "didn't think so, just let me play a little bit, here." About a minute and a half later, the controller asked the pilot his intentions, and stated that he had lost him on radar. The pilot did not respond to the radio call or additional radio calls.

A review of radar data revealed the airplane tracked in a northwest arc from Schaumburg airport; the track continued southwest towards DPA. The airplane then completed about three-quarters of a figure eight pattern, before disappearing from radar. The radar indicated that the airplane was at an altitude of about 1,900 ft. mean sea level (approximately 1,200 ft. above ground level) during the figure eight pattern.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The on-site examination of the wreckage and ground scars were consistent with a left wing, nose down impact with terrain. The main wreckage, which consisted of both wings, the fuselage, and empennage, was located further along the wreckage path. Numerous pieces had separated from the airplane and were scattered, but remained near the wreckage site. The cabin area was largely destroyed; both wings remained with the fuselage and the leading edge of the right wing displayed impact damage. Both wing fuel tanks were breached and torn open. The empennage remained attached to the fuselage with impact damage to the vertical and horizontal stabilizers. There was not a post-crash fire.

The engine had separated from the fuselage and was just beyond the main impact crater. The fixed pitch, 2-bladed propeller remained attached to the engine's crankshaft flange. One blade was twisted and curled past 90 degrees, back towards the hub; the other blade was slightly twisted and bent; largely on the outboard section.

The rudder control cables were found connected to the rudder horn; the cables continued forward to the forward cabin. The rudder cables had separated from the rudder/brake control assembly; the cable breaks were consistent with the overload due to the accident. The rudder/brake assembly was not intact, and several pieces/components of it were found along the wreckage path. Control continuity for the elevators was established to the forward cabin.

Aileron continuity was established to each of the wing bellcranks, both cables had separated at the wing roots, consistent with overload.

The flap actuator measured about ¼ inch, which corresponds to a flaps retracted position.

The engine was retrieved and transported to a hangar facility for further examination.

The engine had sustained extensive impact damage. The engine was rotated by hand; continuity was established to the accessory section of the engine and through the valve train; a thumb compression test confirmed compression and suction in each cylinder. The carburetor had separated and was broken open, the starter was broken and had separated from the engine. The left magneto remained with the engine, but was shattered; the right magneto was able to produced spark on each terminal.

The sparkplugs exhibited light colored combustion deposits, except the number four-bottom sparkplug, which was oil soaked. The electrodes exhibited normal signatures, in accordance with the Champion aviation check-a-plug chart.

No pre-impact abnormalities were noted during the airframe or engine examinations.

Two shoes were located at the accident site that the pilot reportedly wore. The shoes were an orthopedic type, designed to reduce foot, leg, and back pain. The shoes incorporate a coil type spring in the heel of the shoe (photograph of the shoes are in the docket for this case).

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Office of the Coroner, DuPage County, Illinois conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was determined to be, "multiple traumatic injuries".

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing on the pilot. The specimens were marked as putrefied and were not tested for carbon monoxide or cyanide. The test was positive for ethanol (27 mg/dL) in muscle, no ethanol detected in the brain. The ethanol is likely from a source other than ingestion.

The test detected Atenolol, Colchicine, Diphenhydramine, and Losartan kidney and liver.

Atenolol- Prescription medication is generally used alone or in combination with other medications to treat high blood pressure.

Colchicine - Prescription medication used to prevent gout attacks in adults, and to relieve relief for gout attacks.

Diphenhydramine (marketed under several brand names, such as: Benadryl, Sominex, Advil PM), is an over-the-counter antihistamine used to treat allergic conditions and as a sleep aid.

Losartan - Prescription medication used primarily for the treatment of high blood pressure. It may also have secondary uses to reduce the risk of stroke in patients with hypertension, an enlarged heart, and for the treatment of diabetic kidney damage.

FOX FLYING CLUB INC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N62681 

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA289 

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, July 03, 2015 in Bartlett, IL
Aircraft: CESSNA 172P, registration: N62681
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On July 3, 2015, about 1545 central daylight time, a Cessna 172, N62681, impacted terrain near Bartlett, Illinois. The airplane was destroyed and the private rated pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered and operated by Fox Flying Club, Inc., under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The local flight originated from the DuPage Airport, (DPA), West Chicago, Illinois about 1510.


The pilot was a member of the flying club, which owned the airplane. It was reported that the flight departed DPA on a short flight to the Schaumburg Regional Airport (06C), located about 8 miles northeast of DPA. During the inbound flight back to DPA, the pilot contacted the tower and reported that he had a problem with the rudder. The pilot declined any assistance, and stated that he just needed to work on it bit. Shortly thereafter the airplane disappeared from radar, and the pilot did not respond to any radio calls. Authorities located the accident site in a vacant field, in a forest preserve area.


The on-site examination of the wreckage and ground scars, were consistent with left wing, nose down impact with terrain. Along the wreckage path just beyond a large impact crater, was the engine and propeller, which had separated from the airframe. The main wreckage, which consisted of both wings, fuselage, and empennage, and was located further along the wreckage path. Numerous pieces had separated from the airplane and were scattered, but remained near the wreckage site. The cabin area was largely destroyed; both wings remained with the fuselage and the leading edge of the right wing displayed impact damage. Both wing fuel tanks were breached and were open. The empennage remained attached to the fuselage with impact damage to the vertical and horizontal stabilizers.


After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane was recovered for further examination.


FAA  Flight Standards District Office: FAA W. Chicago-DuPage (NON Part 121) FSDO-03


Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov .



Michael Sandman






Friends and fellow fliers say they're still shocked by the "catastrophic" death of a Bloomingdale pilot who was known for his meticulous attention to safety.

The DuPage County Coroner's office late Tuesday identified the pilot as 61-year-old Michael Sandman of the 100 block of Fairfield Way. Authorities said he died when the small aircraft he was piloting crashed Friday afternoon in the Hawk Hollow Forest Preserve near Bartlett.

The coroner's office used dental records to identify Sandman, officials said, and then contacted his only known living family member, an uncle in Florida.

Officials said Sandman, a telecom engineer, was the only person aboard the 1982 Cessna C172P, which was registered to and rented from the Fox Flying Club at the DuPage Airport. A voice mail and email seeking comment from the club on Wednesday were not immediately returned.

In an audio recording of Sandman's last communications with air traffic controllers, available online at liveatc.net, Sandman tells them he's having issues with his rudder.

"I'm about four or five miles northeast (of DuPage Airport) but I'm having a problem with a rudder so I'm going to stay out here for a minute," Sandman told the DuPage tower at 3:44 p.m. Friday.

Seconds later, the tower asked Sandman if he needed assistance.

"I don't think so," he replied. "Let me just play with it a little here."

At 3:46 p.m., Sandman failed to reply to the tower and was not heard from again.

Allen Goldstein, owner of Aerial Images Photography, owns a similar plane and knew Sandman from hanging out at the DuPage Airport.

"I was shocked because I knew (Sandman) to be a very safety-conscious pilot. We even attended many of the same safety seminars together at the airport," Goldstein said.

"And boy did he love his gadgets and gizmos. Everyone knew Mike had all the latest toys for monitoring altitude, weather, you name it. He probably went a little overboard, actually."

Sandman's YouTube channel contains flight instruction videos he made while also piloting a Cessna C172P.

The National Transportation Safety Board is continuing to investigate the crash.

Source:  http://www.dailyherald.com


 


The pilot of a Cessna 172P Skyhawk aircraft died after the plane crashed about 3:45 p.m. Friday in a field in the Hawk Hollow Forest Preserve near Bartlett. 

The pilot was a Bloomingdale man who came from Schaumburg Regional Airport and did a quick landing and takeoff at DuPage Airport a source said, and had radioed in with "engine issues."

National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Peter Knudson said the pilot had reported a "control" problem.

DuPage County Coroner Rich Jorgensen joined the NTSB and other investigators at the scene. The coroner did not release the name of the pilot pending notification of family members, DuPage County Forest Preserve spokeswoman Sue Olafson said.

The FAA was told only one person was on board, spokesman Tony Molinaro said.

Olafson said the coroner and Federal Aviation Administration investigators were to return to the scene Saturday morning.

ABC 7 Chicago reported the plane was registered to the Fox Flying Club, a nonprofit based at the DuPage Airport. Aerial pictures of the crash site showed the small plane in many pieces in the field, with a narrow line of charred ground behind it.

Skip Barchfeld, president of the Northwest Flyers based at Schaumburg Regional Airport, said the pilot also did only a quick landing and takeoff at the Schaumburg airport.

"All I can tell you is that that airplane did land at the Schaumburg airport earlier today but did not stop.

It just landed, taxied back and took right back off again," Barchfeld said.

"That's very common. People go to practice takeoffs and landings all the time," Barchfeld said. "I was not there when the airplane actually landed and took off, but speaking to my line people and office people, they said it was nothing that appeared unusual. He just landed and taxied back and took off. On a nice day like today, a lot of pilots go out there to hone their skills on taking off and landing, going to different airports to get experience at different airports."

Residents of Brandon and Newcastle lanes, the neighborhood near where the plane went down, reported hearing a loud noise late Friday afternoon. Others did not hear the crash or mistook it for early fireworks.

"It was really close, and all of a sudden, it just went straight down," Amy Weber of Bartlett told ABC 7. "But we couldn't see where it hit."

Steve Colaizzi was outside weeding when he heard a big boom he attributed to pre-Independence Day fireworks but he now believes accompanied the crash.

"If (the pilot) put it down on purpose, he did a good job," said Colaizzi, whose neighborhood is about 100 yards from the crash site.

Colaizzi said he estimates there are 40 to 50 houses on the street that backs up to the crash site, where he said he observed fire department personnel, forest preserve district officers, and local, county and state police walking near the crash site searching for debris.

Other residents reported seeing part of the wreckage only after hearing that there was a crash. A piece of the wing and a red blanket were visible about two blocks from the crash site, said Laura Nowack, a Newcastle Lane resident who saw neither smoke nor fire coming from the wreckage.

Diane K. Arnold of Hanover Park said via social media that she lives only five minutes away from the crash site. "I didn't hear anything, just sirens," she wrote.

Source: http://www.dailyherald.com
 



pilot was killed when his Cessna 172P Skyhawk plane crashed in a field in the DuPage County Forest Preserve near the western suburb of Bartlett on Friday afternoon, officials said.

The pilot had reported problems with the plane's rudder, which helps steer the plane, before the Cessna 172P Skyhawk crashed about 3:45 p.m. in the middle of the field near 1390 Newcastle Lane, the officials said.

No one else was aboard the plane and no nearby homes appeared to have been hit. DuPage County officials confirmed that there was one fatality.

The DuPage County coroner's office said the victim would not be publicly identified before Saturday and that next of kin had yet to be notified. Sue Olafson, spokeswoman for the DuPage County Forest Preserve District, said the impact was hard and that the coroner said there was no question that the man died on impact.

Peter Knudson, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board, said the pilot reported the rudder control problem to air traffic controllers. He said NTSB investigators were heading to the scene.

Aerial footage showed the plane broke into at least two major pieces on impact.

The plane was registered to the Fox Flying Club, which is based at DuPage Airport. Officials of the club were not available for comment.

Kathleen Marmitt, who lives on Newcastle Lane near the site of the crash, said she didn’t hear anything. She knew something had happened when she saw people running near her house and heard helicopters overhead.

Marmitt said she could see no damage to any houses near hers.

Mary Ellen Bjorkman, who lives adjacent to the forest preserve, said while she was not home when the crash occurred, one of her neighbors told her he heard what he thought was a car backfiring. They did not know a plane crashed until they saw the news helicopters, she said.

A Bartlett Fire Department staffer said fire department and emergency personnel were on the scene from Bartlett, South Elgin, DuPage County, the Illinois State Police, Hanover Park and Hanover Township Emergency Services. Several all-terrain vehicles were brought in by trailer.

According to one neighbor, the path being used by emergency personnel to access the scene is about 2.2 miles long. Officials said the crash was about 1 1/2 miles inside the preserve.

Source:  http://www.chicagotribune.com



 


 
 

 


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