Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Raytheon Beechjet 400A, Aerolíneas Ejecutivas, XA-MEX: Accident occurred December 23, 2015 at Telluride Regional Airport (KTEX), San Miguel County, Colorado

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Salt Lake City, Utah
Mexican Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil
Aerolineas Ejecutivas

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA067
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 129: Foreign operation of Aerolineas Ejecutivas S A De CV
Accident occurred Wednesday, December 23, 2015 in Telluride, CO
Aircraft: HAWKER 400, registration: XA-MEX
Injuries: 7 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On December 23, 2015, about 1415 mountain standard time, a Hawker Beechcraft 400XP airplane, XA-MEX, collided with a snowplow while landing at the Telluride Regional Airport (KTEX) Telluride, Colorado. The pilot, co-pilot, five passengers, and the snowplow operator were not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by Aerolineas Ejecutivas, Toluca, Mexico, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 129 as an air taxi flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time. The flight departed Monterrey, Mexico, with a planned stop in El Paso, Texas, en route to Telluride, Colorado.

Prior to departure from Monterrey, the crew obtained preflight information, including Notice to Airmen (NOTAMs ) for the planned route of flight. The NOTAMs for KTEX noted several runway closure times; however, none of the closures were valid for the period during which the flight would arrive at KTEX. 

The flight departed El Paso at 1220 MST and the flight crew discussed the weather conditions at their destination airport, including concern that the weather maybe below minimums and may not allow for a landing. The Montrose Regional Airport (KMTJ), Montrose, Colorado, was discussed as an alternate destination. As the flight neared their destination, the crew was in contact with a Denver en-route/center controller. The crew also listened to the Telluride's airport automated weather station.

At 1348, the controller asked the pilots to advise him when they had the weather and NOTAMS for KTEX, adding that another airplane just attempted an approach into KTEX, but had to execute a missed approach. The pilot reported that they received the weather information and planned to make the approach. The controller responded by giving the flight a heading, saying this would be for the descent and sequence into the airport.

At 1350, the airport operator entered a NOTAM via computer closing the runway (effective 1350) for snow removal, and the airport operator proceeded onto the runway. 

At 1358, the controller cleared the accident airplane for the approach to the airport. The pilot then canceled his flight plan at 1402 with the airport in sight. The crew did not change radio frequency to the airport's common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) for traffic advisories.

During the landing, the crew did not see the snowplow on the runway until it was too late to avoid a collision. 

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot sitting in the left seat held a Mexican Airline Transport License with a rating for airplane multi-engine land. The pilot held a class one medical certificate issued on July 09, 2015, with no restrictions or limitations. The pilot had 8,238 hours total flight time, with 1,412 in the accident make and model. 

The pilot sitting in the right seat held a Mexican Airline Transport License with a rating for airplane multi-engine land. His class one medical certificate was issued on December 16, 2015, with no restrictions or limitations. The pilot had 7,113 hours total flight time, with 1,919 in the accident make and model.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a Hawker Beechcraft 400XP (BE40), which is a low wing, twin-engine business jet, powered by two Pratt & Whitney JT15D turbofan engines. The airplane was under a continuous airworthiness maintenance program, with the last inspection dated July 25, 2015. At the time of the accident, the airplane had accumulated 5,744.25 flight hours.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Telluride Regional Airport (KTEX) is a public-use, non towered airport, located 5 miles west of Telluride, Colorado. The airport has a single asphalt runway 9/27, that is 7,111 ft long by 100 ft wide. Pilots are to use the CTAF for communications. There is an Automated Weather Observation Station (AWOS) station located on the airfield for weather information. The AWOS recording typically has a reminder for pilots about noise abatement procedures. Due to the surrounding terrain, runway 27 is recommended for takeoff, and 09 for landing. 

Authorized airport personnel manage the NOTAMs online via the FAA NOTAM Manager. 

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1415, the Telluride AWOS recorded; wind 010 degrees at 3 knots, 1 and ¾ mile visibility with light snow, broken clouds at 1,100 ft, and overcast sky at 2,200 ft, temperature 23 degrees Fahrenheit (F), dew point 18 F, and a barometric pressure of 29.50 inches of mercury.

COMMUNICATIONS

After departing El Paso, Texas, the crew was in radio contract with Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC) controllers along their route of flight. After the crew changed from the Albuquerque Center controller to the Denver Center controller, the crew asked and received the latest weather for KTEX. The flight changed section controllers a couple times, before contacting the final sector controller responsible for the KTEX airport. 

The controller's workload was described as heavy, working multiple air traffic arrival and departures from other airports in the sector, including Montrose and Aspen. 

Prior to XA-MEX approach to KTEX, the controller was in contact with a Beechcraft KingAir (call sign Foothills (FH) 122), who made an approach to the Telluride airport. About 1313, the controller asked FH122 to let him know when he had the weather and NOTAMs, adding that the weather was down [below minimum] at times. The pilot reported that he had the weather and NOTAMs, and the weather appeared good enough for an approach. About 1330, the controller cleared FH122 for the localizer-DME runway 9 approach to KTEX. Shortly afterwards the pilot acknowledged a handoff to the advisory frequency and said he would report landing. About 1340, the pilot (FH122) reported a missed approach to the controller. The controller advised the pilot to fly the published missed approach procedure, before working a clearance to the Montrose airport. 

During a follow-up telephone conversation with the NTSB Investigator in Charge, the pilot of FH122 stated that he had talked on CTAF to a lady at the airport and the weather did not look that good. He then decided to do a missed approach before getting to the runway.

After the accident, the accident airplane's cockpit voice recorder (CVR) was shipped to the vehicle recorder lab in Washington, DC for download. A CVR group was convened and the recording was auditioned by a CVR group consisting of representatives from the NTSB, FAA, Mexican Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC), and a technical representative from the operator. Excerpts of communications are listed in the CVR Specialist Factual Report, which is located in the official docket for this investigation. 

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane's right wing collided with the rear of the snow removal equipment, about halfway down the runway. The impact separated the right wing from the fuselage near the wing root. The airplane same to rest just off the snow covered runway surface. Minor damage was reported to the snow removal equipment.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Denver center controller (sector 12) position was initially staffed with a radar controller and a radar-associate controller. Facility Operating Procedure requires controllers to issue appropriate NOTAMs to pilots. The facility added that in the past, they received a phone call from an airport operator notifying them of an upcoming NOTAM that closed the airport or a runway; however, currently, airport operators enter NOTAMs directly into the system and they do not receive the telephone calls. 

When a NOTAM is entered into the Aeronautical Information System Replacement system (AISR), center automatically receives the NOTAM in the En Route Information Display System (ERIDS) at the controller's position. However, the controller is not alerted of a new NOTAM, and if the controller is on a different page on ERIDS, the NOTAM will not be visible. 

One minute prior to XA-MEX being cleared for the approach, the radar associate controller moved over to the radar position. There was not a record of a position relief briefing and it was not known if a relief checklist was used.

A review of information contained in the FAA Aeronautical Information Manual (AIM), 

4-1-9, Traffic Advisory Practices at Airports Without Operating Control Towers, 

c. Recommended Traffic Advisory Practices 

1. Pilots of inbound traffic should monitor and communicate as appropriate on the designated CTAF from 10 miles to landing. Pilots of departing aircraft should monitor/communicate on the appropriate frequency from start-up, during taxi, and until 10 miles from the airport unless the CFRs or local procedures require otherwise.

4-1-10. IFR Approaches/Ground Vehicle Operations

a. IFR Approaches. When operating in accordance with an IFR clearance and ATC approves a change to the advisory frequency, make an expeditious change to the CTAF and employ the recommended traffic advisory procedures.

b. Ground Vehicle Operation. Airport ground vehicles equipped with radios should monitor the CTAF frequency when operating on the airport movement area and remain clear of runways/taxiways being used by aircraft. Radio transmissions from ground vehicles should be confined to safety-related matters.

The airport manager reported that the snowplow was equipped with radios; the snowplow operator and the customer service representative inside the airport terminal both monitor the advisory frequency on the radio. He added that they also review a flight tracker program and reservations for potential inbound aircraft. He added that reservations are not required, nor will the flight tracker program show all traffic, but it does give them an idea of potential arrivals and departures. XA-MEX was not on the flight tracker and did not have a reservation at the airport.

NTSB Identification: CEN16LA067
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 129: Foreign operation of Aerolineas Ejecutivas
Accident occurred Wednesday, December 23, 2015 in Telluride, CO
Aircraft: HAWKER 400, registration: XA-MEX
Injuries: 7 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 23, 2015, about 1415 mountain standard time, a Hawker 400 airplane, XA-MEX, collided with snow removal equipment while landing at the Telluride Regional Airport (KTEX) Telluride, Colorado. The pilot, co-pilot, and five passengers were not injured and the airplane was substantially damaged during the accident. The airplane was registered to and operated by Aerolineas Ejecutivas, Toluca, Mexico, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 129 as an air taxi flight. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the time. 

The initial report indicated that air traffic control cleared the airplane for the approach to the airport. The pilot then cancelled his instrument flight rules (IFR) flight plan when the airport was in sight. During the landing, the airplane's right wing collided with a snowplow that was on the runway, which separated the wing from the fuselage. The non-towered airport's runway was reportedly closed by a Notice to Airmen (NOTAM), prior to the airplane's arrival. 

The airplane was retained for further examination.

http://www.sanmiguelcountyco.gov

San Miguel County Sheriff 
Telluride Plane Crash News Release:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Plane Crash on Telluride Airport Runway

Seven on Board; No Injuries

Contact: San Miguel County Sheriff Bill Masters 970-729-2025
or Pubic Information Officer Susan Lilly 970-729-2028


December 23, 2015 -- (Telluride, CO) – A small twin-engine aircraft carrying seven people crashed as it landed and struck a snowplow on a closed runway at Telluride Airport Wednesday afternoon. 

There were no reported injuries but the incident triggered a multi-agency response including multiple San Miguel Sheriff’s Office Deputies and more than a dozen Telluride Fire Protection District Fire, EMS and HAZMAT personnel.

The Hawker Beechjet 400, registered out of Mexico, originated out of El Paso, Texas with five passengers and two crewmembers on board when it landed at 2:15pm (MT), struck a snowplow, and slid off the runway.

Airport officials told Sheriff Deputies the runway was closed for snow removal maintenance at the time of the landing, and airport FBO (Fixed Base Operator) reportedly did not receive any radio communication from the pilot prior to the aircraft’s landing.

An airport employee told Sheriff’s Deputies he was driving the snowplow when it was struck from behind and said he never saw the plane coming. He estimated the speed of the aircraft to be around 100mph at the time of impact. He too was uninjured.

Broken snow showers were in the area at the time of the crash, but visibility was at least 7 miles, and wind was not believed to be a factor.

San Miguel County Sheriff Bill Masters said, “We had rapid response from multiple agencies to ensure scene safety and initiate any appropriate interventions needed. We were pleased all occupants walked away uninjured.”

Telluride Fire Protection District Chief John Bennett said, “This is what we all train for, and we were glad we didn’t have a more critical situation two days before Christmas.”

The National Transportation Safety Administration (NTSB) will be investigating the incident.




TELLURIDE, Colo. — A small twin-engine plane landing in Telluride crashed into a snow plow at Telluride Airport Wednesday afternoon, according to the San Miguel County Sheriff’s Office.

The Hawker Beechjet 400, registered out of Mexico, originated out of El Paso, Texas with five passengers and two crewmembers on board when it landed at 2:15 p.m., struck a snowplow and slid off the runway, according to the Sheriff’s Office.

The occupants were Mexican citizens traveling to Telluride for vacation, the Sheriff’s Office said.

Airport officials told Sheriff Deputies the runway was closed for snow removal maintenance at the time of the landing and the airport operator reportedly did not receive any radio communication from the pilot prior to the aircraft’s landing.

An airport employee told Sheriff’s Deputies he was driving the snowplow when it was struck from behind and said he never saw the plane coming. He estimated the speed of the aircraft to be around 100 mph at the time of impact.

There were no reported injuries from anyone on the plane or the plow driver.

Broken snow showers were in the area at the time of the crash, but visibility was at least 7 miles, and wind was not believed to be a factor.

“We had rapid response from multiple agencies to ensure scene safety and initiate any appropriate interventions needed,” San Miguel County Sheriff Bill Masters said. “We were pleased all occupants walked away uninjured.”

The multi-agency response included multiple San Miguel Sheriff’s Office Deputies and more than a dozen Telluride Fire Protection District Fire, EMS and HAZMAT personnel.

The National Transportation Safety Administration (NTSB) will be investigating the incident.

Source:   http://kdvr.com



TELLURIDE – The pilot who struck a closed snowplow from behind when a twin-engine aircraft landed on a snowy runway at Telluride Regional Airport Wednesday afternoon did not radio the fixed base operator before it happened, according to the San Miguel County Sheriff's Office.

Seven people – five passengers and two crew members – were aboard the Raytheon Hawker 400XP when it landed, struck the snowplow and slid off the runway.


The plane was registered out of Mexico, according to the San Miguel County Sheriff's Office, and originated out of El Paso. The people aboard were headed to Telluride for a vacation.


Deputies say the snowplow operator – who also wasn't hurt – didn't see the plane coming. He told investigators the aircraft was going around 100 miles per hour at the time of impact.


The runway was closed at the time. The fixed base operator reportedly did not receive any radio communications from the pilot before he landed the plane.


The San Miguel County Sheriff's Office says it was snowing at the time of the crash, but that visibility was at least seven miles.


The crash prompted a large response from firefighters, EMS and HazMat personnel.


The National Transportation Safety Board  will investigate the incident.


Story and video:  http://www.9news.com





TELLURIDE, Colo. - A small plane attempting to land in Telluride crashed into a snowplow.


The twin-engine plane hit the plow on a runway at Telluride Regional Airport on Wednesday afternoon.


None of the seven people aboard the Hawker Beechjet 400 were hurt. An airport employee driving the plow estimates the plane’s speed to have been 100 mph at the time of impact, the San Miguel Sheriff's Office said. He, too, was unhurt.


The plane hit the plow from behind, and then slid off the runway.


Crews shut down the runway before the crash because of snow removal and maintenance. Airport operators said they did not receive radio communication from the plane prior to landing.


The aircraft is registered out of Mexico. Wednesday’s flight originated out of El Paso, Texas.


Snow showers were falling at time of the crash but officials estimate visibility was at least 7 miles.


The NTSB will investigate.


Story:  http://www.thedenverchannel.com





TELLURIDE, Colo. (CBS4)– A small plane crashed at the Telluride Airport on Wednesday afternoon. The airport was closed for snow removal at the time of the crash.

There were five passengers and two crew members on board the plane that was flying to Telluride from El Paso, Texas. The Hawker Beechjet aircraft is registered out of Mexico.

The airport was closed for snow removal when the plane landed and collided with a snowplow on the runway. The San Miguel Sheriff said the pilot did not radio the airport before landing.

The passengers were traveling to Telluride for vacation.

Story and video:  http://denver.cbslocal.com

Single Plane Crash at Telluride Airport: NO injuries, 5 passengers, 2 crew traveling to Telluride for vacation; flight from El Paso, TX. Hawker Beechjet aircraft registered out of Mexico. Fixed Base Operator (FBO) states airport was closed for snow removal; reportedly pilot did not radio airport base before landing aircraft. Telluride Fire Protection District has rescue engine, hazmat technicians, fire and EMS on scene.

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Yowza!

Anonymous said...

Did the snowplow radio before entering the runway, was there an X placed at the end of the runway, was Denver Center advised the airport was closed, did Denver clear the aircraft for the approach and have the people on the plane gotten lawyers yet?

Anonymous said...

Way too many aircraft crashes with Mexican pilots! They fly here and don't obey FAA regulations! They break all the rules! The pilot(s) should be arrested, license to fly revoked by the FAA.

Anonymous said...

Piloto ves una pista ahí abajo?

Anonymous said...

Loss of directional control during landing.

Anonymous said...

I believe you are wrong regarding the mexican pilots that crash in the USA, If you look
at the statistics there are 100's more accidents with usa pilots than mexican.
i happen to know that mexican company and they are highly trained pilots.
they go to Dallas Simuflite for training 2 times per year. one of the pilots is an ex AIRBUS 320 captain. this company has more that 40 jets and have been in bussiness for over 30 years.
so please dont post dumb comments if you dont know exactly what happen.

Anonymous said...

Did the professional pilots of this aircraft confirm NOTAMS and weather with Center prior to being cleared onto the approach?

Anonymous said...

Never checked the NOTAMS @ @

Anonymous said...

Sounds eerily similar ---
Canadair CL-600-2B16 Challenger 601-3R (N115WF)
A flight from Toluca, Mexico to Aspen-Pitkin County Airport, Colorado.

http://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20140106X95024

One of the two men who survived the Jan. 5 plane crash at the Aspen airport has hired a Chicago law firm for a multimillion-dollar lawsuit that is to be filed in Pitkin County District Court.

Miguel Henriquez was a passenger on the Bombardier Challenger 600 that smashed into the runway while landing and burst into flames, killing co-pilot Sergio Emilio Carranza Brabata, 54.

It’s unclear who will be listed as defendants by Ribbeck Law Chartered, the aviation law firm that is representing Henriquez.

Mervin Mateo, an attorney with the firm, said Thursday that the lawsuit may focus on Bombardier, the company that manufactured the plane and, according to Mateo, trained the pilot, Moises Carranza. Henriquez, Carranza and Brabata were the only people aboard.

Carranza “was not really trained to land a plane at the Aspen airport,” Mateo said. “Based on the information I have received, this might have been his first attempt to land there.”

Amid wind gusts as high as 30 knots, Carranza had aborted his first attempt at landing at Sardy Field.

An air traffic controller informed him that tail winds had averaged 16 knots and gusted up to 25 knots in the minute before the second attempt to land. That far exceeds the recommended maximum tail winds for landing a Bombardier Challenger 600.

The airport itself could also be a focus of the lawsuit.

“Based on recent reports of the ongoing investigation, it appears that the crash could have been caused by a combination of factors that would include the failure of Aspen airport to cancel flights from landing, possible human error and mechanical malfunction of the aircraft,” the law firm said in a statement released Thursday.

Airport director Jim Elwood declined comment about the pending lawsuit, saying it’s unclear what its basis will be.

He did say he wasn’t surprised that litigation is likely.

“It’s not uncommon in these types of events for all connected parties to go through some kind of analysis” of their role, he said. “It’s the nature of the way the world works these days.”

Henriquez was initially hospitalized in critical condition in St. Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction. He has since been upgraded to good condition. Carranza, who is Brabata’s brother, was also hospitalized before being released Jan. 10.

Monica Kelly, head of Ribbeck Law, said in the statement that the lawsuit will “demand that the problems with the airport, the training of the crew and the condition of the aircraft are immediately resolved to avoid future tragedies.”

She wants a judge to order the release of evidence regarding the design and operations of the airport, and the manufacturing and maintenance records of the plane.

While it was windy on the day of the accident, it wasn’t snowing. Even if it was, it is the pilot’s decision on whether to attempt a landing, Elwood said, citing the doctrine known as pilot in command. The standard essentially means the pilot has the ultimate responsibility for the safety of a flight.

That’s a long-standing tradition throughout the history of aviation, he said: “Decisions to fly or not to fly are to be made by pilots.” Staff could close the airport if, for instance, snow was piling up so fast that the runway no longer met the standards of the Federal Aviation Administration, Elwood said.

The possibility that the airport could be named as a defendant is “sheer nonsense,” said Mike Boyd, an aviation expert and principal of Boyd Group International.

He also cited the pilot-in-command standard. Carranza “did do a go-around once, and he made that determination to land,” Boyd said. “The airport had nothing to do with that. The airport has no control over whether tail winds gust up or not.

“It’s up to the pilot in command, and he obviously made a bad decision.” Aspen Daily News

Anonymous said...

I know for a fact that they checked the notams, I see them brief all the time prior to each flight, they have have a dispatch office with at least 3 dispatchers at any given moment. Am sure it was a chain of errors on the controllers side, pilots and airport, it's never just a single event that causes this accidents. We are going to have to wait to see what the NTSB concludes.

Anonymous said...

The approach controller did not advise them of the closed NOTAM because the approach controller did not have it. The airport put the NOTAM out immediately before they put the snowplow on the runway. Denver ARTCC is contacting airports telling them to call them if they are going to close the airport on short notice. Airport authorities should not have attempted to avoid responsibility for this.

AJ said...

Here's what is known. When the crew departed KELP, the airport was open, so it is obvious they would have missed the NOTAM.
The Telluride airport authority closed the airport on short notice and immediately put the plow to work. Denver ARTCC did not know the airport was closed or that a NOTAM had been issued on short notice, and as result cleared the aircraft for the approach. Calling or reporting to the FBO and other traffic on the CTAF, while advisable, it is not a requirement, nor does an FBO ever issue a landing clearance - that's just plain ludicrous. The Airport's eagerness to shed claim by saying the airplane did not call in to the FBO is indicative that they know, they're out on a limb here.

The comment about Mexican pilots should be disregarded as coming from someone who is obviously dumb and racist. This could have happened to any crew and it could have been a lot worse if not tragic. A lot to learn and do to prevent this from happening again in the future.

JJ said...

It's pretty obvious that most of you that are commenting never even read the report. Maybe you should all go back and do that before commenting. For one; the NOTAM was issued one minute before the clearance, and they had no way of getting it. They didn't ignore the NOTAM, they ignored the CTAF.

By far my favorite comment though: "I believe you are wrong regarding the mexican pilots that crash in the USA, If you look
at the statistics there are 100's more accidents with usa pilots than mexican."


Seriously? More US pilots crash airplanes in the US than Mexican pilots crash in the US? That's hardly a useful statistic, but thanks for your wisdom.