Friday, October 23, 2015

Cessna 310C, N310CD and Piper PA-28R-200, N9475N: Accident occurred October 23, 2015 in Primm, Clark County, Nevada

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA016A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 23, 2015 in Primm, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: CESSNA 310C, registration: N310CD
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.


Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA016B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 23, 2015 in Primm, NV
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/01/2017
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-200, registration: N9475N

Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Both the multi-engine airplane and the single-engine airplane were maneuvering in the local practice area at 6,500 ft mean sea level. The flight instructor and private pilot receiving instruction on board the multi-engine airplane were performing an introductory/familiarization flight. The flight instructor reported that the airplane was on a northwesterly heading when he observed a small dot in front of him; he then saw an approaching airplane just before impact. He stated that the pilot receiving instruction, who was controlling the airplane at the time, made a slight nose-down input just before the collision. After assessing the damage as a jammed rudder, the flight instructor elected to proceed back to the departure airport, where he landed the airplane uneventfully. 

The private pilot of the single-engine airplane stated that, while performing engine power checks on a southwesterly heading and while in a left turn, he heard a loud bang. He subsequently observed another airplane flying away from his position and then heard a radio transmission on the departure airport's tower frequency, advising that the pilot had been involved in a midair collision. The airplane then experienced a total loss of engine power, and the pilot subsequently performed an uneventful forced landing on a dry lake bed. Examination of the airplane revealed substantial damage to the right forward wing root area, which compromised the fuel system and resulted in the subsequent loss of engine power.

The practice area where the accident occurred was used widely for training flights, and pilots operating in the area typically monitored the common traffic advisory frequency (CTAF) of a nearby, non-tower-controlled airport. The pilots of both accident airplane's, however, were only monitoring the tower frequency of their departure airport. Had the pilots of both airplanes been more vigilant in scanning for potential traffic in the area while maneuvering, as well as monitoring and communicating their positions on the CTAF frequency, the midair collision would most likely have not occurred.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The inadequate visual lookout by the pilots of both airplanes, which resulted in a midair collision. Contributing to the accident was the pilots' failure to tune to, monitor, and communicate over the common traffic advisory frequency their relative positions while in the training area.
 



The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration; Las Vegas, Nevada 

N310CD Aviation Accident Factual Report -  National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N9475N Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N310CD

LNS LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N9475N

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA016A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 23, 2015 in Primm, NV
Aircraft: CESSNA 310C, registration: N310CD
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 23, 2015, about 1015 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 310C multiengine airplane, N310CD, and a single-engine Piper PA-28-200, N9475N, collided in midair, about 5 nautical miles south of Primm, Nevada. The Cessna's certified flight instructor (CFI), who occupied the right pilot seat, and the pilot/owner receiving instruction who occupied the left pilot seat, were not injured. Additionally, the pilot of the Piper, who was the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flights were being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and no flight plans had been filed. Both airplanes departed the Henderson Executive Airport (HND), Henderson, Nevada, the Cessna about 0915, the Piper about 0950.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the CFI of the Cessna reported that while giving the pilot/owner instruction in approach configurations at 6,500 feet mean sea level (msl), on a magnetic heading of 340 degrees, he observed a small dot in front of him, and just prior to impact he saw an approaching airplane; the CFI opined that he thought the pilot/owner had made a slight nose down control input prior to the collision. After assessing the damage to the airplane, which had resulted in a jammed rudder, the CFI contacted the HND air traffic control tower, reported the midair collision, and indicated that he would be returning to HND. The Cessna subsequently landed at HND without further incident. A postaccident examination revealed that the airplane's vertical stabilizer and rudder had sustained substantial damage.

In a telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC, the pilot of the Piper stated that he was level on a southwest heading at 6,500 msl level doing engine power checks, and as he initiated, or was already in a left turn, he heard a loud bang. The pilot reported that after the impact, he observed another airplane flying away from his position, and shortly thereafter heard a radio transmission to the HND tower from a pilot indicating that he had been involved in a midair collision, and was returning to HND. The pilot further stated that he subsequently experienced a loss of engine power, after which he elected to land on a dry lake bed. The pilot added that upon landing and during the landing roll, he had no right brake, which was the result of the right main landing gear brake line having been compromised due to the collision. Additionally, fuel was dripping from the right side of the airplane, due to a fuel line having been compromised as a result of the impact with the Cessna. It was also revealed that the right wing's forward wing root area had sustained substantial damage, as well as the left horizontal stabilizer.

According to a local Federal Aviation Administration operations aviation safety inspector who interviewed the pilots of both airplanes, the inspector reported that the area in which the accident occurred, near the Jean Airport (0LF), Jean, Nevada, is widely used for training. As such, a common practice is for pilots in the area to use the 0LF Common Traffic Advisory Frequency (CTAF) 122.9, while in the area to make position reports, monitor other aircraft, and to continue to do so while operating in the area. The inspector reported that none of the three pilots reported using the 0LF CTAF frequency at any time leading up to the accident; they were monitoring the HND control tower frequency.

The FAA Airplane Flying Handbook states,

"Collision Avoidance: All pilots must be alert to the potential for midair collision and near midair collision. This concept requires that vigilance shall be maintained at all times, by each person operating an aircraft regardless of whether the operation is conducted under instrument flight rules (IFR) or visual flight rules (VFR). Most midair collision accidents and reported near midair collision incidents occur in good VFR weather conditions, and during the hours of daylight. Most of these accident/incidents occur within 5 miles of an airport, and/or near navigation aids."

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA016A
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 23, 2015 in Primm, NV
Aircraft: CESSNA 310C, registration: N310CD
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

NTSB Identification: WPR16LA016B
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, October 23, 2015 in Primm, NV
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28R-200, registration: N9475N
Injuries: 3 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On October 23, 2014, about 1029 Pacific daylight time, a Cessna 310C multiengine airplane, N310CD, and a single-engine Piper PA-28-200, N9475N, collided in mid-air, about 5 nautical miles south of Primm, Nevada. The Cessna's certified flight instructor (CFI), who occupied the right pilot seat, and the pilot/owner receiving instruction who occupied the left pilot seat, were not injured. Additionally, the pilot of the Piper, who was the sole occupant, was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident. The local flights were being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, and no flight plans had been filed. Both airplanes departed the Henderson Executive Airport (HND), Henderson, Nevada, the Cessna about 0915, the Piper about 0950.

In a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC), the CFI of the Cessna reported that while giving the pilot/owner instruction in approach configurations at 6,500 feet mean sea level (msl), on a magnetic heading of 340 degrees, he observed a small dot in front of him, and the next moment he saw an approaching airplane just before impact; the CFI opined that he thought the pilot/owner had made a slight nose down control input prior to impact. After assessing the damage to the airplane, which had resulted in a jammed rudder, the CFI contacted the HND air traffic control tower, reported the mid-air collision, and indicated that he would be returning to HND. The Cessna subsequently landed at HND without further incident. A postaccident examination revealed that the airplane's vertical stabilizer and rudder had sustained substantial damage.

In a telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC, the pilot of the Piper stated that he was level on a southwest heading at 6,500 msl level doing engine power checks, and as he initiated, or was already in a left turn, he heard a loud bang. The pilot reported that after the impact, he observed another airplane flying away from his position, and shortly thereafter heard a radio transmission to the HND tower from a pilot indicating that he had been involved in a mid-air collision, and was returning to HND. The pilot further stated that he subsequently experienced a loss of engine power, at which time he elected to land on a dry lake bed. The pilot added that upon landing and during the landing roll, he had no right brake, which was the result of the right main landing gear brake line having been compromised due to the collision. Additionally, fuel was dripping from the right side of the airplane, due to a fuel line having been compromised due to the impact with the Cessna. It was also revealed that the right wing leading edge wing root area had sustained substantial damage.









HENDERSON, NV (FOX5) - No serious injuries were reported after two airplanes collided in the sky over Jean on Friday morning, according to officials.

According to Christine Crews, spokeswoman for McCarran International Airport, the two small planes departed from the Henderson Executive Airport on Friday morning. Those planes collided about 10:15 a.m.


Crews said one of the planes was able to return to the Henderson airport. The second plane landed in a dry lake bed near the Nevada-California state line.


The three people aboard the two airplanes were not seriously injured, according to Crews. However, both airplanes sustained significant damage.


Crews said both the National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration will likely investigate the crash.



- Source: http://www.fox5vegas.com


McCarran International Airport confirms that there was a mid-air collision near Primm just after 10:15 a.m.

The collision involved a Piper Arrow PA-28 carrying one person and a Cessna 310 with two people on board. 


Both aircraft took off from the Henderson Executive Airport earlier today.


The Piper Arrow PA-28 went down in the desert on the San Bernardino County side of the border near Primm in the dry lake bed.


Clark County Fire Department is responding to that scene.


So far the pilot of that aircraft is walking and talking and there are no reports of injury. 


The Cessna 310 landed safely at Henderson Executive Airport and taxied off the runway. 


Clark County Fire Department's Deputy Fire Chief, Jeff Buchanan, says there were no fires reported as a result of both landings.


"Only leaking fuel from the downed plane in the dry lake bed," said Buchanan. 


FAA and NTSB say they will be investigating this collision. 



- Source: http://www.news3lv.com 


Two small planes came into contact in the air over Jean on Friday morning, according to a spokesperson for McCarran International Airport.

According to officials, both planes left from the Henderson Executive Airport. McCarran says it was notified of the collision at 10:19 a.m.

One of the planes was able to land in a dry lake bed in San Bernardino County over the state line in California and the other plane returned to the Henderson Executive Airport.

The planes involved are a Cessna 310 and a Piper PA-28. The Piper landed in the dry lake bed and the Cessna returned to Henderson.

There was only one person on the Piper, the pilot. Two people were on the Cessna. It is believed that no one was injured. The Piper reportedly has significant damage to the tail area. There is also significant damage to the Cessna. It is not known why the planes came into contact.

The Clark County Fire Department responded to the incident.

The Federal Aviation Administration will be responsible for investigating the mid-air collision.

- Source:  http://www.ktnv.com

PRIMM — Nevada, California and federal authorities are working to figure out how two small planes collided in mid-air Friday morning near Jean, about 30 miles southwest of Las Vegas.

It happened about 10:15 a.m., according to the Clark County Department of Aviation. One plane, a twin-engine Cessna, was able to land safely at the Henderson Executive Airport. The other, a Piper Arrow, landed in a dry lake bed in California, just southwest of Primm.

No injuries were reported.

The Cessna, carrying two people, taxied off the runway in Henderson without causing any airport delays, aviation department spokeswoman Christine Crews said.

One person was on the Piper Arrow, Crews said. Clark County firefighters found the plane, Crews said, and the pilot was walking and talking.

Both planes took off from the Henderson airport, according to the Clark County Fire Department. Departure times and planned destinations were not available.

The only visible damage to the Arrow was on the right wing, which had been bent and pulled slightly away from the body of the plane.

But Crews said damage to both aircraft was significant. 

Besides media, which were ordered by the California Highway Patrol to stay half a mile back from were the Piper Arrow stopped, the only onlooker at the remote lake bed was Steve Holeman. He comes out regularly to ride his landsailer, a sort of wind-powered go-kart.

"I've had that thing up to 56 mph, believe it or not," he said, showing off a picture of his ride.

Holeman is part of an informal group, the Ivanpah Wind Runners, and regularly updates its Facebook page to let others know the conditions and whether the Bureau of Land Management has blocked off the lake bed for the day. It's not safe to ride or drive on the lake bed if it's too soft from recent rain.

The Facebook updates save other landsailing buffs from driving all the way there — some live in Arizona — only to find the gate locked.

Holeman, who lives in Las Vegas, had come out Friday morning just to check the conditions. When he drove up to ask questions about the plane, he said, police were so vague that he wondered whether something more exciting was going on — a drug interdiction, perhaps.

Police left about 2 p.m., leaving the plane alone in the middle of the lake bed.

The Federal Aviation Administration, National Transportation Safety Board, Nevada Highway Patrol and Las Vegas police also are investigating.

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