Monday, December 29, 2014

Piper PA-23-160 Apache G, Eagle Support Services LLC, N222CP: Fatal accident occurred December 29, 2014 near Erie-Ottawa International Airport (KPCW) Carl R. Keller Field, Port Clinton, Ohio

National Transportation Safety Board - Aviation Accident Final Report: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Docket And Docket Items - National Transportation Safety Board:   http://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

National Transportation Safety Board -  Aviation Accident Data Summary: http://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N222CP 

FAA Flight Standards District Office:  FAA Cleveland FSDO-25

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA088
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, December 29, 2014 in Port Clinton, OH
Probable Cause Approval Date: 10/21/2015
Aircraft: PIPER PA 23-160, registration: N222CP
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot was departing on a cross-country flight in the twin-engine airplane. A witness stated that before takeoff, the pilot spent about 20 minutes in the run-up area. As the airplane departed the runway, witnesses heard a "popping" noise come from the airplane. The airplane struggled to gain altitude, and one witness stated it appeared to have a problem with the left engine. The airplane turned left and descended. A review of a security camera video showed that the airplane turned left after takeoff, entered a rapid nose-down descent, and impacted terrain.

A small amount of water was found in the left engine's carburetor; however, firefighter response efforts could not be eliminated as a potential source for the water. Based on the weather conditions at the time of the accident, the airplane was operating in an area associated with a risk of carburetor ice accumulation at glide and cruise power settings, but not at takeoff power settings. Witness reports and findings from the investigation are consistent with a loss of control following a loss of left engine power; however, the examination of the airframe and engines did not reveal evidence of any preimpact abnormalities.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:

The pilot's loss of control following a loss of left engine power for reasons that could not be determined because an examination of the airframe and engine did not reveal any preimpact abnormalities.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On December 29, 2014, about 1500 eastern standard time, a twin-engine Piper PA-23-160 airplane, N222CP, impacted terrain near Port Clinton, Ohio. The airplane was destroyed and the commercial rated pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered and operated by Eagle Support Services, LLC Worthington, Ohio, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The cross-country flight was originating from the Erie-Ottawa International Airport, Carl R Keller Field (KPCW), Port Clinton, Ohio, at the time of the accident.

The airplane had recently undergone maintenance and an annual inspection. After the inspection, the mechanic conducted a test flight on the airplane, with no problems noted. The airplane's owner was then to fly the airplane back to his home airfield.

Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane before flight and during takeoff. One of the witnesses reported that he saw the pilot start the left and then right engines, and then spend 20 minutes in the run-up area, before departing. Two witnesses, who were located near the airport terminal, reported that shortly after takeoff, they heard a "popping" sound come from the airplane. One of the witnesses speculated it might be the left engine based on the way the airplane was flying. The airplane made a turn to the left, then rolled left, and descended. Two other witnesses, located near the airport diner, stated that the takeoff appeared normal. Shortly afterwards, the airplane turned left then made a steep turn, before it descended and impacted terrain. They added that they weren't able to determine if the airplane's engine sounded normal. Other witnesses reported the airplane was struggling to gain altitude and that it sounded like an engine was "stalling".

A security camera from a department store captured the accident flight on a surveillance video. A review of the video revealed the airplane at distance and coming into view from left to right, as the airplane departed. The airplane appeared to make a left turn, away from the camera; the airplane was then barely visible. A "wing flash" was seen, before the airplane entered a rapid nose down descent, before impact with terrain.

PILOT INFORMATION

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single and multi-engine land and instrument – airplane. On the pilot's application for a medical certificate dated December 09, 2014, he reported 675 total flight hours, with 10 hours in the last six months. The issuance of the third class medical certificate was deferred to the Aerospace Medical Certification Division by the Aviation Medical Examiner (AME). The deferral was as based on the pilot's blindness in the right eye, as a result of a personal injury. At the time of the accident, the deferral application process had not been completed. The pilot's previous third class medical certificate was issued on May 9, 2012. A review of the pilot's flight log revealed he had about 165 flight hours in multi-engine airplanes.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The Piper PA-23-160, Apache, is a low-wing, retractable landing gear, twin-engine airplane, originally powered by Lycoming O-320 reciprocating engines and full-feathering constant speed propellers. The hydraulic pump, which powers the landing gear, is located on the left engine. The accident airplane had been previously modified with two Lycoming O-360-A1D engines. A review of the airplane maintenance records showed the airplane's annual inspection had been completed on December 24, 2014, with an airplane total time of 6131.4 hours. At the time of the inspection, the left engine had 562.0 hours since overhaul, and the right engine had 559.1 hours since overhaul.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 1512, the automated weather observation facility located at KPCW recorded; a wind from 020 degrees at 5 knots, 10 miles visibility, an overcast sky at 3,400 feet, temperature 29 degrees Fahrenheit (F), dew point 19 F, and a barometric pressure of 30.30 inches of mercury.

The carburetor icing probability chart included in Federal Aviation Administration Special Airworthiness Information Bulletin No. CE-09-35, Carburetor Icing Prevention, indicated that the airplane was operating in an area that was associated with a risk of carburetor ice accumulation at glide and cruise power settings.

AIRPORT INFORMATION

The Erie-Ottawa International Airport, Carl R Keller Field (KPCW) is a public-use, non-towered airport, located 3 miles east of Port Clinton, Ohio. Pilots are to use the CTAF (Common Traffic Advisory Frequency) for communications. KPCW has a runway 9/27 which is asphalt, 5,646 feet by 100 feet, and 18/36 asphalt runway, 4,001 feet by 75 feet.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane wreckage was located about 0.25 mile west of KPCW's runway 18/36, near a residential area. The on-site examination of the wreckage and ground scars was consistent with a left wing low, and near vertical impact with terrain. The airplane came to rest nose down, several pieces separated from the airplane, but remained near the wreckage site. Both wings had heavy impact damage and remained with the fuselage; the main cabin was severely crushed. The empennage was twisted and remained attached. The empennage vertical and horizontal stabilizers and their respective control surfaces appeared undamaged. Both engines had impact damages and were partly buried in the ground. Each engine's 2-bladed propellers were buried or were under the wreckage with only a small portion of the tips exposed. A fuel smell was present on site. Water had pooled up in depressions around the wreckage and was attributed to first responders/firefighters response to the accident site.

After the on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane was recovered to a nearby hangar for further examination.

The nose and front cabin area of the airplane was extensively damaged by the impact and the damaged area extended into the aft section of the cabin. The empennage appeared absent impact damage.

The engine throttle levers were noted to be in a staggered position, with the left being in the slightly retarded position as compared to the right lever. The mixture controls indicated the left was full forward and the right lever was full aft. Both of the propeller control levers were at the full forward position. The carburetors heat controls positions could not be determined due to impact damage. The right engine's tachometer contained a contact mark, consistent with an indicating needle at 2,600 rpm; a contact mark was absent on the left engine's tachometer.

The overhead trim selector positons were not determined; however, the rudder trim tab appeared near the neutral position. Rudder and elevator continuity was established to the control column. The left aileron remained attached at its hinge points and the right aileron had separated at its hinge points, and was located in the debris field. The main landing gear appeared to be in the down (extended) position.

Each engine was removed from the airframe and transported to a heated hangar. The left engine crankshaft had broken just aft of the propeller flange. A visual inspection of the engine revealed the throttle, mixture, and carburetor heat controls remained attached. The carburetor's mount was broken, but the carburetor remained attached. A small of amount of water was found in the carburetor bowl; however, firefighter's efforts could not be ruled out as a potential source for the water. The engine driven fuel pump had impact damage. The magnetos were removed and produced a spark on each terminal when rotated. The engine was rotated and continuity to the accessory section and valve train was established. A thumb suction and compression test was done on each cylinder. The cylinders were removed and no discrepancies were noted. One blade was absent visual damage, the second blade was bent aft towards the non-cambered side, starting about mid-span. The propeller was not in the feathered position.

The right engine throttle, mixture, and carburetor heat controls remained attached. The carburetor's mount was also broken, but remained attached to the oil sump mounting studs. Initially, the engine would not complete a rotation; the engine sat overnight in the hangar. The following morning, the engine was rotated by hand and continuity and compression test were done. The initial lack of rotation was attributed to ice accumulation in the engine as a result of being partly submerged in water after the accident. The ice then melted after the engine sat in a heated hangar overnight. The propeller remained attached to the engine. One propeller blade had only a slight twist/bend in it, and the other blade was curled back towards the non-cambered side, starting near the propeller hub. The blade's outboard section's leading edge exhibited ground polishing marks. The propeller was not in the feathered position.

No pre-impact abnormalities were noted during the engine and airframe examinations.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

The Lucas County Coroner's Office, Toledo, Ohio, conducted an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was determined to be, "multiple blunt trauma".

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, conducted toxicological testing on the pilot. The specimens were negative for carbon monoxide and ethanol. Cyanide testing was not performed. The test was positive for ibuprofen and paroxetine.

Ibuprofen is an over the counter anti-inflammatory medication, it is typically marketed under trade names such as, Motrin or Advil.

Paroxetine is a prescription antidepressant used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Use of this medication is disqualifying for an aeromedical certification.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Excerpt from Advisory Circular (AC) 61-21A, Flight Training Handbook

Engine Out Procedures

The following procedures are recommended to develop in the transitioning pilot the habit of using proper procedures and proficiency in coping with an inoperative engine.

(1) Set mixture and propeller controls as required; both power controls should be positioned for maximum power to maintain at least Vmc.

(2) Retract wing flaps and landing gear.

(3) Determine which engine failed, and verify it by closing the throttle on the dead engine.

(4) Bank at least 5 degrees into the operative engine.

(5) Determine the cause of failure, or feather the inoperative engine.

(6) Turn toward the nearest airport.

(7) Secure (shut down) the inoperative engine in accordance with the manufacturer's approved procedures and check for engine fire.

(8) Monitor the engine instruments on the operating engine; and adjust power, cowl flaps, and airspeed as necessary.

(9) Maintain altitude and an airspeed of at least Vyse if possible.

The pilot must be proficient in the control of heading, airspeed, and altitude, in the prompt identification of a power failure, and in the accuracy of shutdown and restart procedures as prescribed in the FAA approved Airplane Flight Manual or Pilot's Operating Handbook.

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA088 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, December 29, 2014 in Port Clinton, OH
Aircraft: PIPER PA 23-160, registration: N222CP
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On December 29, 2014, about 1500 eastern standard time, a twin-engine Piper PA-23-160 airplane, N222CP, impacted terrain near Port Clinton, Ohio. The airplane was destroyed and the commercial rated pilot was fatally injured. The airplane was registered and operated by Eagle Support Services, LLC Worthington, Ohio, under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and the airplane was not on a flight plan. The flight was originating from Carl R Keller Field Airport (PCW), Port Clinton, Ohio. 

Several witnesses reported seeing the airplane. Two witnesses, who were located near the terminal, reported that shortly after takeoff, they heard a "popping" sound coming from the airplane. The airplane made a turn to the left, and then rolled left and descended. Two other witnesses, located near the diner, reported seeing the airplane. They reported that the takeoff appeared normal, shortly afterwards the airplane turned left then made a steep turn, before it descended and impacted terrain. They added that they weren't able to determine if the airplane's engine sounded normal. 

The on-site examination of the wreckage and ground scars, were consistent with a left wing down, and near vertical impact with terrain, near a residential area. The airplane came to rest nose down, several pieces separated from the airplane, but remained near the wreckage site. Both wings had heavy impact damage and remained with the fuselage, the main cabin was severely crushed; the empennage was twisted and remained attached; the empennage vertical and horizontal stabilizers and their respective control surfaces appeared undamaged. Both engines had impact damages and were partly buried in the ground. Each engine's 2-bladed propellers were buried or were under the wreckage with only a small portion of the tips exposed. A fuel smell was present on site.

After the initial on-site documentation of the wreckage, the airplane was recovered for further examination.


Any witnesses should email witness@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.



Richard R. Schimizze, 60, of Worthington, passed away unexpectedly Monday, December 29, 2014 as a result of an airplane accident in Port Clinton, Ohio. 

Rick earned his undergraduate degree from Purdue University and a Masters Degree from Clemson University. He retired from the United States Navy as a Lieutenant Commander after 22 years of service. After retirement he joined SEA Corporation and was a Forensic Engineer. 

He is survived by his loving wife of 40 years, Anna; parents, Tony and Ingrid; children, Melissa (Rob) Patris, Angela (Erik) Peterson, Mark Schimizze, Jeff (Yuni) Schimizze, Lindsay (Matt) Morgan and Ben (Mackenzie) Schimizze. He is also survived by seven grandchildren; sisters, Arlette (Warren) Stobbe, Anita (Blake) Rieboldt and brother, Michael Schimizze. Rick and Anna were members of the Church of Christ at the Fishinger and Kenny Roads congregation where Rick was active as a Bible class teacher and served as an elder. Rick was involved in outreach to the Navajo reservation in Keyenta, Arizona and interested in the scientific evidences of the Christian faith.

Friends may call Sunday 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. at the SCHOEDINGER WORTHINGTON CHAPEL, 6699 N. High Street (1/2 mile south of 270) and 1 hour prior to service at church. Funeral service 11 a.m. at the Fishinger and Kenny Road Church Of Christ, 1130 Fishinger Rd., Columbus, OH 43221. Greg Tidwell officiating. Visit www.schoedinger.com to send online condolences to the family. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Missions Fund at the Fishinger and Kenny Church of Christ. 

PORTAGE TOWNSHIP – A pilot died after his plane crashed into a backyard next to the Erie-Ottawa International Airport just after it took off Monday afternoon, an Ohio Highway Patrol official said.   

The pilot, Richard R. Schimizze, 60, of Worthington, was pronounced dead at the scene. Schimizze was the only person aboard the craft, a twin-engine Piper Apache, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol, Sandusky Post.

Surveillance footage from nearby Wal-Mart shows the plane taking off and gaining altitude, said Brett Gockstetter, commander of the patrol's Sandusky Post. The video then shows the plane banking hard to the left before crashing at 3:01 p.m., Gockstetter said.

This was the plane's first flight since it had been worked on, Gockstetter said. He did not have information about the work that had been done to the plane and said he did not know where the pilot was headed.

The patrol does not know whether there was a mechanical problem, pilot error or some other issue that caused the crash, Gockstetter said.

The plane came to rest behind a home on East Harbor Road with its nose to the ground. The tail was too mangled for authorities to read its identification numbers, he said.

The Federal Aviation Administration was at the scene and will take over the investigation when the patrol has finished its preliminary inquiry. FAA spokesmen were not available for comment Monday evening.

The Ottawa County coroner, Ottawa County Sheriff's Office and Port Clinton Fire Department also were at the scene.

Phillip Carrisalez of Port Clinton was headed to Wal-Mart when he saw the plane go down.

"I'm pretty sure I saw a plane flail and fall in between two trees," he said. "It was surreal. It was like, did I really just see that?"

Carrisalez went to the scene to see if he could help. There were already people there. The plane was crumbled, and there was nothing he could do.







PORT CLINTON, Ohio - A man who died in a plane crash on Monday in Ottawa County has been identified by officials.

An airplane crash has killed at least one person on Monday, according to Highway Patrol. 

The victim has been identified as 60-year-old Richard Robert Schimizze of Worthington, Ohio.

Troopers say Schimizze was flying the plane when it crashed at about 3 p.m. near the Erie-Ottawa International Airport in Port Clinton, near State Route 163.

Highway Patrol says one person is dead. The FAA is at the scene investigating.

Troopers say the plane was a Piper Apache. 

13abc reports there were no calls for distress from the pilot and that the plane crashed just after takeoff from the airport.

Trooper says witnesses report the plane did a nosedive and crashed.

PORT CLINTON — One person was killed in a plane crash at Erie-Ottawa International Airport today, authorities said.

Authorities have not released the name of the victim, who is believed to be the plane’s pilot and only occupant. Earlier there were believed to be two people confirmed dead.

The single-engine Piper aircraft crashed about 3 p.m. behind the Walmart store, which is near the airport, according to the Ohio Highway Patrol’s Sandusky post said.

The patrol said the plane crashed shortly after taking off from the airport. Surveillance video from Walmart is being used in the investigation and helped reveal that the plane was headed northwest and after a sharp turn to the left, took a nose dive and crashed near State Rte. 163, the patrol said.

No one on the ground was injured, but authorities spread foam near the crash site to contain fuel spilling from the plane.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating the crash.

Port Clinton, in Ottawa County, is about 40 miles east of Toledo.

Story and photo:  http://www.toledoblade.com


 13abc.com Toledo (OH) News, Weather and Sports


PORTAGE TOWNSHIP, Ohio -- A plane has crashed in Ottawa County, according to the Sheriff's Office. 

The crash is in a backyard near Port Clinton, near the Erie–Ottawa International Airport, where the plane had just taken off from.

The State Highway Patrol tells Kristina Smith, a reporter for the Port Clinton News Herald, which is also owned by Gannett, which owns WKYC, that the pilot, who was the only person on the plane, was killed.

The crash happened about 3 p.m. just off state Route 163 along East Harbor Road.

Sandusky Post Commander Brett Gockstetter told Smith the pilot is a man who is not from the Port Clinton area and that this was the plane's first flight since it had work done on it. He did not know where the plane was flying to.

The Erie-Ottawa International Airport is the largest airport between Cleveland and Toledo. It has 4,000-foot and 5,000-foot crossing runways.

Emergency crews are on the scene of a plane crash near the Erie-Ottawa International Airport in Port Clinton.

Ottawa County sheriff Steve Levorchick confirms at least one person was killed in the crash.  He says the plane is a small, single engine aircraft.

Around 3:00pm, a spokesperson for the airport confirmed an aircraft down near SR 163.  

We're told the plane crashed just after taking off from the airport. 

No calls for distress were received from the pilot.

Troopers say witnesses reported seeing the plane do a nose dive. 

The victim's identity has not been identified at this time.




1 comment:

Neil said...

What a heart breaking shame! God's blessings and God's love to the family and friends.