Thursday, May 8, 2014

Cessna 150F, Above View Aviation, N8236F: Accident occurred May 07, 2014 in Santa Clara, Utah

http://registry.faa.govN8236F 

NTSB Identification: WPR14FA183
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 07, 2014 in Santa Clara, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/29/2015
Aircraft: CESSNA 150 - F, registration: N8236F
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

A witness reported that he observed the airplane at an altitude of between 800 to 1,000 ft above ground level about 2 miles from his location. About the same time, he also heard the airplane’s engine sputter, and he then observed the airplane in a vertical, nose-down attitude for 3 to 4 seconds before it went out of sight behind a hill. The wreckage was found about 2 hours later in remote mountainous, rocky terrain. An on-site examination of the airframe and engine revealed that the airplane impacted the terrain upright in a flat orientation on a 27-degree downslope. Based on observed impact signatures, the airplane’s forward momentum was negligible just before it impacted terrain. All of the components necessary for flight were accounted for at the accident site. 
Additionally, examinations of the airframe and engine revealed no anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. Based on the witness’s observations and the physical evidence observed at the accident site, it is likely that the airplane was in a steep descent at a low altitude and that the flight instructor failed to pull the airplane up and out of the nose-down attitude at a sufficient altitude to preclude impact with terrain.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The flight instructor’s failure to arrest the airplane’s descent and maintain clearance from mountainous terrain while maneuvering at a low altitude.

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On May 7, 2014, about 0855 mountain daylight time, a Cessna 150F airplane, N8236F, sustained substantial damage following impact with remote mountainous terrain while maneuvering about 2 nautical miles (nm) west of Santa Clara, Utah. The airplane was owned and operated by Above View Aviation, Saint George, Utah. The certified flight instructor, who occupied the right cockpit seat, and the pilot receiving instruction, who occupied the left cockpit seat, were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local instructional flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. A flight plan was not filed. The flight had departed the Saint George Municipal Airport (SGU), Saint George, Utah, about 0800.

In an interview with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge (IIC), the operator of the airplane, Above View Aviation, stated that this was the second or third orientation flight for the left seat student pilot, who had recently become interested in learning to fly. The operator stated that he thought the flight departed between 0815 and 0830, and that there was a radio call from the pilot stating that they were departing to the north, but that they could not have gone too far, as the cloud ceilings came down quickly to the north. He also stated that there were no further radio calls from the accident airplane, although a local pilot did report observing the accident airplane flying low level about 2 to 3 miles northwest of the airport at about 0915.

In a telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC about one week after the accident, a witness reported that he and his brother were out for a bicycle ride on the morning of the accident, having arrived at the Rim Runner bike trail at about 0800 local time. The witness stated that at exactly 0848, he observed an airplane overhead flying from east to west; the time was exact due to the fact that he looked at his watch at this time. The witness opined that he estimated that the altitude of the airplane at this time was between 800 to 1,000 ft above ground level. The witness stated that shortly thereafter, while the airplane was still proceeding to the west and when it was about 2 miles from his location, he heard the airplane's engine sputter, and then observed the airplane in a vertical nose down attitude for between 3 to 4 seconds. The witness also recalled seeing the wings wobbling at 0853, before it went out of sight behind a hill. The witness added that at 0856, he made a 911 call, and reported that his position was at the Santa Clara River Reserve, Zone #4, at which time he looked for signs of smoke, but there was none. At 0902, the witness stated that he called Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), but the recording indicated that they were temporarily unavailable. At this time the witness and his brother rode up to a high bluff to see if they could identify a plane crash, but they couldn't. He concluded by saying that at 1055, after he had ridden down the Barrel Roll trail, he spotted the wreckage.

The airplane was located in rugged, remote mountainous terrain at coordinates 37 degrees 7 minutes 10 seconds north latitude, and 113 degrees 41 minutes 59 seconds west longitude, and at an elevation of about 3,540 feet mean sea level. The airplane impacted rock-covered terrain on a 27-degree downslope in an upright orientation, and on a measured magnetic heading of about 350 degrees, which coincided with the airplanes at rest heading. All components necessary for flight were accounted for at the site of the accident.

PERSONNEL INFORMATION

Flight Instructor

The flight instructor (CFI), age 75, held an airline transport pilot certificate, with single-engine and multiengine land ratings, and instrument airplane rating, and a flight instructor rating for airplane single-engine, multiengine, and instrument airplane. The instructor's most recent biennial flight review was conducted on October 9, 2013, and his most recent FAA first-class airman medical certificate was issued on June 11, 2013, with no limitations noted.

A review of the CFI's personal pilot logbooks by the NTSB IIC, as well as data provided by the airplane's operator, Above View Jet Center of Saint George, Utah, revealed that at the time of the accident the pilot had accumulated a total time of 14,756 hours, 10,862 hours in multiengine airplanes, 3,894 hours in single-engine airplanes, and about 11 hours in the accident airplane make and model. It was also revealed that the pilot had accumulated 9,657 hours as pilot in command, and about 3,350 hours of instruction given as a certified flight instructor. Additionally, the pilot had flown a total of 77 hours, 55 hours, 22 hours, and 1 hour in the previous 90 days, 60 days, 30 days, and 24 hours respectively. The pilot held type ratings on the following airplanes: CE-500, CE-525S, EA-500S, EMB-120, and the SA-227.

The pilot's flying experience included being a pilot in the United States Air Force from August 1965 to November 1985, pilot for a FAA Part 121 regional airline from October 1989 to December 1999, contract flying and flight instructing from January 1999 to October 2000, scenic flying in an EMB-120 airplane, Katmandu, Nepal, from October 2000 to April 2001, and general FAA Part 91 flying activities, including charters and flight instruction from May 2001 until the day of the accident.

Pilot Receiving Instruction

The pilot receiving instruction had neither a student pilot certificate nor a valid FAA airman medical certificate. According to the operator of the airplane, at the time of the accident the pilot had accumulated a total flying time of 4 hours, with 2 hours in make and model, all within the preceding 90 days, and 1 hour within the last 24 hours.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The accident airplane was a Cessna model 150F, serial number 15064336. It was a two-place, high-wing airplane, with a fixed tricycle landing gear configuration. The airplane was originally issued a utility category standard airworthiness certificate in June 1966, and was maintained in accordance with the Manufacturer's Inspection Program. Its most recent continuous airworthiness inspection was performed on March 10, 2014, at a total time 8,993 hours.

The airplane was powered by a Lycoming O-320-E2D engine, serial number L44995-27A, and equipped with a McCauley fixed pitch, two-bladed propeller. It was reported that at the time of the accident the engine had accumulated a total time of 5,389 hours, 2,703 hours since it last overhaul, and 49 hours since it most recent inspection.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

At 0835, the SGU Automated Weather Observing System (AWOS), located 10 nm southeast of the accident site, reported wind 130 degrees at 4 knots, visibility 10 miles, overcast clouds at 7,000 feet, temperature 12 degrees C, dew point minus 1 degree C, and an altimeter setting of 29.75 inches of mercury.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

An examination of the airframe and engine was conducted at the accident site on May 8, 2014. The examination revealed that the airplane had come to rest on the side of a mountain in an upright position, oriented facing down slope on an incline of about 27 degrees. The airplane's at rest magnetic heading was 350 degrees; a relative impact heading could not be definitively determined.

Airframe Examination

All major structural components of the airplane were present at the accident site. All control surfaces were observed attached at their relative attach points. Control cable continuity was established throughout the airframe. Cables were observed pinched under the cabin floor.

The elevator trim tab was faired, and the elevator trim control was damaged. The flaps were in the retracted position; the flap actuator retracted 0.0" extension. The flap switch was spring loaded to neutral.

The throttle was closed, the mixture control was full rich, and the carburetor heat was off. The magneto switch was selected to the BOTH position.

The rudder stop Airworthiness Directive had been complied with: Left present and Right separated in the impact sequence. The rudder stop bolts were damaged.

The #1 control yoke (left pilot station) was observed to be unremarkable, and the #2 yoke (right pilot station) had separated due to impact forces.

The position of the fuel selector was undetermined. Both fuel tanks had been breached (supply line). Both tanks contained fuel, and both fuel caps were serviceable and secured.

A survey of the cockpit instrumentation revealed the following: the directional gyro read 060 degrees, the airspeed indicator read 0, and the vertical speed indicator also read 0. The transponder was observed set at squawk code 1200 (VFR). The fuel indicators read empty, and the fuel pressure read 0. The altimeter reading was 2,630 feet, and the pressure was set at 29.78 inHg. The Omni Bearing Selector read 260 degrees, the tachometer read 629.6 hours, and the Hobbs meter read 2,415.0 hours.

The examination of the airframe revealed no catastrophic failure that would have precluded normal operation.

Engine Examination

The engine remained attached to the airframe by the engine mount. The engine had sustained significant impact energy damage at the oil sump and exhaust system. Visual examination of the engine revealed no evidence of pre-impact catastrophic mechanical malfunction or fire.

The vacuum pump was removed, and the crankshaft was rotated by hand through the drive pad utilizing a drive tool. The crankshaft was free and easy to rotate in both directions. Thumb compression was observed in proper order on all four cylinders.

The top spark plugs were removed and examined, with normal wear observed.

The complete valve train was observed to operate in proper order, and appeared to be free of any pre-mishap mechanical malfunction. Normal "lift action" was observed at each rocker assembly. Clean, uncontaminated oil was observed at all four rockerbox areas. Mechanical continuity was established throughout the rotating group, valve train and accessory section during hand rotation of the crankshaft.

The combustion chamber of each cylinder was examined through the spark plug holes utilizing a lighted borescope. The combustion chambers remained mechanically undamaged, and there was no evidence of foreign object ingestion or detonation. The valves were intact and undamaged. There was no evidence of valve to piston face contact observed. There was significant ductile bending of the exhaust system components.

The left and right magnetos remained securely clamped at their respective mounting pads. The ignition harness was secure at each magneto. Magneto to engine timing could not be ascertained, due to the destruction of the flywheel.

The impulse coupler equipped left magneto produced a spark at the end of each spark plug lead (B2 & 4, T1 & 3) during hand rotation of the crankshaft. The right magneto was removed and the drive was found intact and properly safetied. The magneto was observed to produce spark at all four plug leads during hand rotation of the drive.

The carburetor bowl was displaced from the carburetor due to the forces of impact. The portion of carburetor that remained attached at the mounting pad was secure. The fracture surface signatures were consistent with overload.

The internal float assembly had sustained impact energy damage and had been displaced from the mounting. There was no fuel observed in the float bowl, and no visible contaminates were observed within the carburetor bowl.

On site examination of the engine driven fuel pump, fuel lines, and carburetor controls was precluded by the positioning of the airplane and engine at the accident site.

The engine fuel system was examined further (post recovery) on July 25, 2014 at the hangar facilities of Above View, Jet Center, St George Airport, Utah.

The carburetor sustained impact energy damage, as described previously. The throttle/mixture controls were found securely attached at their respective control arms of the carburetor.

The fuel pump was attached to the engine at the mounting pad. The fuel lines remained secure at their respective fittings. The fuel pump cover was removed for examination. The fuel pump remained free of internal mechanical malfunction and obstruction to flow. The diaphragm remained intact. The foam filter element remained securely attached to the airbox bracket. The filter element remained intact and exhibited no evidence of pre-impact obstruction to airflow.

The two-bladed, fixed pitch, McCauley propeller remained attached at the crankshaft flange. The spinner was attached to the propeller. The propeller blade tips exhibited minor rotational damage signatures.

The examination of the airplane's engine failed to reveal any anomalies that would have precluded normal operation.

MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

On May 8, 2014, an autopsy of the right-seat pilot was performed at the facilities of the Office of the Medical Examiner, Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, Utah. The results of the examination revealed that the cause of death was attributed to "total body blunt force injuries."

Toxicological testing was performed on the right-seat pilot by the FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The results of the testingrevealed no Carbon Monoxide detected in the Blood, no Ethanol detected in the Vitreous, and testing for Cyanide not performed. Additionally, Desmethylsildenafil and Sildenafil (Viagra) was detected in the Blood and Urine.

On May 8, 2014, an autopsy of the left-seat pilot was performed at the facilities of the Office of the Medical Examiner, Utah Department of Health, Salt Lake City, Utah. The results of the examination revealed that the cause of death was attributed to "total body blunt force injuries."

Toxicological testing was performed on the right-seat pilot by the FAA's Civil Aeromedical Institute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The results of the testing revealed no Carbon Monoxide detected in Blood, no Ethanol detected in Blood, and no testing performed for Cyanide. Additionally, all testing for drugs was negative.

 NTSB Identification: WPR14FA183
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Wednesday, May 07, 2014 in Santa Clara, UT
Aircraft: CESSNA 150 - F, registration: N8236F
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On May 7, 2014, about 0855 Mountain daylight time, a Cessna 150F airplane, N8236F, sustained substantial damage following impact with remote mountainous terrain while maneuvering about 3 nautical miles (nm) west of Santa Clara, Utah. The airplane was owned and operated by Above View Aviation, Saint George, Utah. The certified flight instructor, who occupied the right cockpit seat, and the pilot receiving instruction, who occupied the left cockpit seat, were fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local instructional flight, which was being operated in accordance with 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. A flight plan was not filed. The flight had departed the Saint George Municipal Airport (SGU), Saint George, Utah, about 0800.

In a statement provided to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) by local law enforcement personnel, a witness reported that he and a family member were riding the Rim Trail when they observed the airplane overhead proceeding west. The witness stated that after a few minutes he heard the airplane "sputter", and the nose diving, then lost sight of it when it went behind a hill; he didn't hear anything and couldn't confirm that it had gone down. The witness reported that about an hour and a half later while riding on the Barrel Roll Trail, he came upon the airplane wreckage, and reported it to local authorities

On the morning following the accident, the NTSB IIC, accompanied by representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration, Lycoming Engines, and Cessna Aircraft, were assisted in accessing the accident site by local law enforcement personnel and search and rescue (SAR) volunteers. An examination of the accident site revealed that the airplane had come to rest on the side of a mountain in an upright position, oriented facing down slope on an incline of about 27 degrees. The airplane's at rest magnetic heading was 350 degrees; a relative impact heading could not be definitively determined. A survey of the accident site revealed that both wings had remained attached to the fuselage at all attach points, and that their respective flaps and ailerons had also remained attached to the respective trailing edge of the wings. The fuselage aft of the cockpit/cabin area was intact, but almost entirely severed from the empennage/tail section. The rudder, vertical stabilizer, left and right horizontal stabilizers, and both elevators sustained moderate impact damage. The underside of the cockpit/cabin area sustained significant deformation due to severe impact damage with the rock-laden terrain. A survey of the airplane revealed that all components necessary for flight were accounted for at the accident site. The airplane was recovered to a secured storage facility for further examination.

At 0835, the SGU automated weather reporting facility, located 10 nm east-southeast of the accident site, reported wind calm, visibility 10 miles, overcast clouds at 8,000 feet, temperature 13 degrees Celsius (C), dew point 0 degrees C, and an altimeter reading of 29.75 inches of mercury.



Brad N. Brian


Obituary
Brad N. Brian
(June 21, 1975 - May 7, 2014)
   
St. George, Utah - Our dear, sweet husband, father, son, brother, and friend, Brad Brian, was taken unexpectedly from this life in an airplane accident on Wednesday, May 7, 2014. Brad was a dreamer, and he usually found a way to make his dreams a reality, a quality that his wife will be endeared with forever. Brad had dreamed of becoming a pilot and flying nearly his entire life, and with the encouragement of his wife, was finally living his dream. Brad was passionate about many things and had a tremendous love for learning. He loved to be adventurous and try new things. He loved business opportunities, was a natural leader and passionate about his career as an Anesthesiologist; he loved his family more than words can express. He loved Friday nights and looked forward to being together with his wife on their weekly dates. He loved to read and teach his children about the gospel of Jesus Christ, about math & physics, Ham Radio, and any topic he himself was learning. He loved to go on family bike rides and walks, thoroughly enjoyed teaching his older two children how to shoot their guns, and enjoyed many family trips to the beach while living in Florida. He loved watching his children learn and grow and develop their talents. He valued education and hard work and was such a great example to his family. He was very organized, intelligent, and goal oriented, always looking towards the future, but he also lived a simple life and lived life to the fullest each day. A favorite saying of his when people asked how he was doing was, “You know, living the dream!” He was a devoted husband and father, a faithful member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, and a true friend to many. He always had a smile, joke, song, quote, or idea that he wanted to share with those around him, and his kind and genuine love for others always drew people to him.

Brad grew up in Loa, Utah and loved the beauty of Wayne County, but he always knew life held adventures and opportunities in other places where he influenced many lives along the way. After graduating from Wayne High School in 1993, he attended Southern Utah University for one year before serving a two-year mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints in the Brazil Salvador South Mission. After returning from Brazil, he attended SUU for one more year before transferring to Utah State University. There he continued his studies in Electrical Engineering and Business and also started dating his long time friend and the one true love of his life, Camille Torgerson, whom he later married in the Manti LDS Temple for time and eternity in May of 1999. He often reminded his wife that he had loved her since the time they were in the same first grade class together and knew that someday they would be together. Brad graduated from USU with Bachelor’s Degrees in both Electrical Engineering and Business in 2001. He went on to earn a Master’s Degree in Bioengineering and a Master’s of Business Administration from the University of Utah in 2003. He loved the opportunities that came from being involved with the University Venture Fund and the Lassonde Entrepreneur Center during this time. He reached his highest goal of academic achievement when he earned his Doctor of Medicine degree in 2007 from the University of Utah. Upon graduation, Brad accepted a position for his medical residency in Anesthesiology at the University of Florida in Gainesville. He was mentored by many colleagues there and himself became a mentor to others as he filled a position as a Chief Resident during his fourth year of residency. A highlight of his time in Florida was serving on the physician team for the NASA flight crew and being able to witness the thrill of shuttle launches and landings up close. Brad and Camille cherished the four years they spent in Florida and will forever be grateful for the experiences they had there together. Brad was thrilled to have landed his dream job when he joined Mountain West Anesthesia and began working at Dixie Regional Medical Center in St. George, Utah, in the summer of 2011.

As a family, we will cherish the memories we have of our son, brother, husband, and father. Brad will always be close in our hearts, cheering us along in life’s journey. Brad was 38 years old and leaves behind his dear wife, Camille, and their four beautiful children, Kaitlyn (12), Landon (9), Cammi (5), and Connor (4), all of St. George, who adore him and will miss him tremendously; his parents: Robert and Edra Brian of Loa; brothers: Gary and Monica Brian and their children, Heston, JaCee and Jentry; Troy and Brenda Brian and their children, Alexis and Regan; all of Loa; his father and mother-in-law: Burke and Barbara Torgerson of Lyman; and brothers and sisters-in-law and nieces and nephews.

He is preceded in death by an infant brother, Brent Brian; and his grandparents, Reed & Marjorie Brian and Nelden and Martha May Ellett.

He will be dearly missed by his neighbors, his patients and colleagues at Dixie Regional Medical Center, and his many family members and friends.

Funeral services will be held Friday, May 16, 2014 at 2:00 P.M. in the Boulder Ridge LDS Stake Center, 1762 South River Road in St. George, where friends may call for viewing Thursday from 6 to 9 P.M. or Friday from 12:00 Noon to 1:30 prior to the services.

Burial will be Saturday, May 17, 2014 at 2:00 P.M. in the Loa Cemetery in Loa, Utah under the care of the Springer Turner Funeral Home of Richfield and Salina, Utah.

A donation fund for Brad's family has been set up at: www.gofundme.com/9056HG

http://www.springerturner.com

Plane crash - help family of Brad Brian http://www.gofundme.com/9056hg


 ST. GEORGE — Two people were killed Wednesday in a plane crash south of Santa Clara.

It marks the first fatal crash reported in Washington County since May 26, 2012, when four men were killed after the plane they were flying crashed near the St. George Municipal Airport runway, but according to the Federal Aviation Administration, more than a dozen fatal crashes have been reported in Washington, Iron and Kane counties since 2000, including:

June 3, 2012 — An air tanker crashes in Iron County after dropping retardant on a wildfire at the Utah-Nevada state line, killing the plane’s pilot and co-pilot, both from Boise, Idaho. The incident occurred as Nevada Bureau of Land Management crews led the fight against an approximately 6,200-acre fire that was started by a lightning strike in eastern Nevada.

NTSB Identification: WPR12GA243 
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Public Use
Accident occurred Sunday, June 03, 2012 in Modena, UT
Aircraft: LOCKHEED P2V-7, registration: N14447
Injuries: 2 Fatal.


May 29, 2012 — Four Las Vegas men are killed after their Cirrus SR20 crashed while maneuvering near Duck Creek Village, north of Zion National Park. All four were tour group pilots employed by Maverick Helicopters in Las Vegas, but were not flying on a company assignment at the time of the crash.

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA235 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 29, 2012 in Duck Creek Village, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/06/2013
Aircraft: CIRRUS SR20, registration: N187PG
Injuries: 4 Fatal.


May 26, 2012 — Four St. George-area residents die in the crash of a small passenger plane just south of the runway at the St. George Municipal Airport. The four victims — Tanner Holt, 23, of Washington City; Alex Metzger, 22, of St. George; Colby Hafen, 28, of Santa Clara; and Christopher Jordan Chapman, 20, of Santa Clara — take off in the early morning hours, with the airplane exceeding its maximum gross weight by about 160 pounds. The pilot and all but one passenger had consumed multiple alcoholic beverage while at a party before the flight, according to the final FAA report, which states that the alcohol consumption likely contributed to the accident.

NTSB Identification: WPR12FA230
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, May 26, 2012 in St. George, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 02/03/2014
Aircraft: CESSNA 172S, registration: N953SP
Injuries: 4 Fatal.


June 30, 2009 — A Las Vegas man is killed after his plane crashes east of the Beaver Dam Wash in Washington County.

NTSB Identification: WPR09FA320
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, June 30, 2009 in St George, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 05/11/2010
Aircraft: PIPER AIRCRAFT INC PA-46-350P, registration: N927GL
Injuries: 1 Fatal.


June 29, 2009 — A 65-year-old dies during a glider competition near Paragonah, reportedly falling from 1,800 feet above the ground, about three miles north of the Parowan Airport.

NTSB Identification: WPR09LA317
4 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Monday, June 29, 2009 in Paragonah, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 04/22/2010
Aircraft: SCHEMPP-HIRTH VENTUS 2CM, registration: N68MP
Injuries: 1 Fatal.


Oct. 18, 2008 — A homemade airplane crashes after taking off from the Parowan Airport, killing the pilot and leaving his wife in critical condition. The couple, who owned a cabin in Iron County, had been flying in and out of the airport regularly.

NTSB Identification: WPR09LA016 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, October 18, 2008 in Parowan, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/09/2009
Aircraft: Heisler Lancair Legacy, registration: N151HT
Injuries: 1 Fatal,1 Serious.


Aug. 22, 2008 — Ten people from the Cedar City area are killed when their plane crashes in Grand County while traveling back from Moab. The group, a medical team of area doctors, physicians assistants and their family members, had been on a medical trip to provide cancer screenings and other services to patients around Moab, where such services weren’t available.

NTSB Identification: LAX08MA277
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Friday, August 22, 2008 in Moab, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/02/2010
Aircraft: BEECH A100, registration: N601PC
Injuries: 10 Fatal.


Dec. 11, 2007 — Three people are killed after their small passenger plane crashes into the side of a mountain near Minersville. Rescue crews find the Bonanza low-wing, six-seat craft and its passengers after a six-hour search through winter cold and rugged terrain near the border between Iron and Beaver counties.

NTSB Identification: SEA08FA045
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, December 11, 2007 in Minersville, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 11/10/2008
Aircraft: BEECH A36TC, registration: N364KW
Injuries: 3 Fatal.


June 17, 2004 — An air tanker crashes northwest of St. George after dropping fire retardant, killing the pilot.

NTSB Identification: LAX04GA243.
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Thursday, June 17, 2004 in St. George, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/25/2007
Aircraft: WSK PZL Mielec M-18A, registration: N8214J
Injuries: 1 Fatal.


Sept. 24, 2001 — A pilot dies while attempting to land at the old mesa-top St. George airport, striking power lines north of the runway and sending wreckage down onto the roadway below. The pilot, a retired FAA aviation safety inspector, reportedly lost engine power before the crash. The airplane came to rest on Bluff Street, at the intersection with Tabernacle Street.

NTSB Identification: DEN01FA162.
The docket is stored in the Docket Management System (DMS). Please contact Records Management Division
Accident occurred Monday, September 24, 2001 in St. George, UT
Probable Cause Approval Date: 07/25/2002
Aircraft: Cessna 337B, registration: N337PM
Injuries: 1 Fatal.


Story and photo:  http://www.thespectrum.com

Lt. Nate Brooksby points toward the site of a plane crash that killed two people Wednesday near Santa Clara


The flight instructor who died with his student pilot in a small airplane crash Wednesday has been identified as a former U-2 spy plane pilot, Gary T. Hawes.

Killed when the Cessna 150F went down about 11 a.m. Wednesday, near the Cove Wash Trailhead in the mountains south of the town of Santa Clara, was 75-year-old Gary Hawes, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel and flight instructor from St. George-based Above View FBO & Jet Center.

Washington County Sheriff’s Sgt. David Crouse on Thursday confirmed that Hawes, along with 38-year-old Brad Brian, of Washington City, had been identified as the victims of the crash.

Hawes family, other than confirming he had died in the crash and had flow U-2s over Cuba and Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War, declined to comment on the accident Thursday.

Brian, a physician at Dixie Regional Medical Center who left behind a wife and four children, "had dreamed of becoming a pilot his entire life and was finally making that dream become a reality," according to a family statement obtained by The Spectrum.

Crouse said that the bodies of the men were recovered Wednesday afternoon after the wreckage of the plane, which had crashed upside down and come apart in impact, was located by search and rescue workers and a helicopter.


Story and comments/reaction:   http://www.sltrib.com



Brad Brian, 38, of Washington, Washington County, died after a Cessna 150F crashed in an area southwest of Santa Clara on Wednesday, May 7, 2014. He is survived by his wife and four children. 
Family photo


Retired U-2 pilot Gary Hawes at his home in St. George on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 


Brad Brian, 38, of Washington, Washington County, died after a Cessna 150F crashed in an area southwest of Santa Clara on Wednesday, May 7, 2014. He is survived by his wife and four children. (Family photo) 






SANTA CLARA, Washington County — Two men who were killed in a plane crash southwest of Santa Clara Wednesday were identified Thursday. 

Pilot Gary Hawes, 75, of St. George, and student pilot Brad Brian, 38, of Washington, Washington County, died in the crash.

The Washington County Sheriff's Office was first notified of the crash about 11 a.m. Wednesday after witnesses saw the fixed-wing airplane go down near the Cove Wash trailhead. A Life Flight helicopter was used to confirm the crash before a high-angle rescue team was transported to the scene, which was in steep terrain.

A Utah Highway Patrol helicopter was used to help recover the bodies Wednesday afternoon.

The single-engine plane was registered to a flight school in the St. George area, according to police. Investigators were unaware of any radio traffic or emergency beacons indicating the aircraft was in distress prior to the crash.

Washington County sheriff's detectives met Thursday with representatives from the Federal Aviation Administration, the National Transportation Safety Board and the Cessna Aircraft Company to investigate details of the crash.

Officials were examining the condition of the plane's frame and engine, as well as the pilot's licensing and weather conditions at the time of the crash, according to Thomas Little of the National Transportation Safety Board.

"Nothing stands out at this time," Little said. "An official determination is still months away."

"We are shocked and heartbroken at Brad's sudden passing," Brian's family wrote in a statement. "Brad had dreamed of becoming a pilot his entire life and was finally making that dream become reality. … Brad leaves behind his wife and four beautiful children, who adore him and will miss him tremendously. … Our thoughts and prayers go out to the Hawes family during this tragedy."