Sunday, March 9, 2014

Cessna 170B, N211R: Accident occurred March 08, 2014 in Mulberry, Florida

14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation 
 Accident occurred Saturday, March 08, 2014 in Mulberry, FL
Probable Cause Approval Date: 12/15/2014
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B, registration: N211R
Injuries: 2 Minor.

NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

The pilot reported that the airplane was on final approach for runway 32 about 15 feet above the ground when he observed a parachutist “drop down in front of” him. He maneuvered to avoid the parachutist; however, the airplane’s right wing collided with the parachute’s suspension lines. The airplane crashed nose-first into the ground, and the parachutist was thrown to the ground. The parachutist reported that he was maneuvering to land at the drop zone and was crossing the approach end of runway 32 about 75 feet above the ground when he first observed the airplane “coming at” him. The pilot was a resident of the fly-in community, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Airport/Facility Directory noted that parachuting operations were conducted in the vicinity of the airport. Although the airplane had been established in the traffic pattern and the parachutist had the opportunity to observe aircraft operations as he descended, it is apparent that the pilot and the parachutist were unaware of each other’s presence until just before the collision. FAA Advisory Circular 90-66A, paragraph 9e, states, "Pilots and parachutists should both be aware of the limited flight performance of parachutes and take steps to avoid any potential conflicts between aircraft and parachute operations." Thus, both the pilot and the parachutist were responsible for being aware of each other’s presence and avoiding each other.

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident as follows:
The failure of the pilot and the parachutist to see and avoid each other, which resulted in the airplane’s wing colliding with the parachute’s suspension lines.

On March 8, 2014, about 1104 eastern standard time (EST), a Cessna 170B, N211R, collided with the ground following an in-flight collision with a parachutist and parachute at South Lakeland Airport (X49), Mulberry, Florida. The private pilot and the parachutist received minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 as a personal flight. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated about 1045.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the pilot was in the local traffic pattern and was performing a full stop landing. While on short final, the airplane struck the lines of the parachute as the parachutist was descending. The airplane pitched up, then down and impacted the turf runway in a nose down attitude. There was no fire. The pilot and the parachutist were taken to a local hospital for treatment of their injuries.

The pilot of the airplane that struck the parachutist reported the following. He was on final approach for runway 32 and was about 15 feet above the ground when "a parachutist dropped down in front of me and was a going to land in the center of the approach end of the runway." He immediately climbed to avoid the parachutist and the parachute rigging caught his wing. He crashed nose first into the ground.

The parachutist reported that he was part of a group of parachutists jumping on the day of the accident. It was a "normal day" and after preparing his gear, the flight departed X49 and climbed to jump altitude. He was about the middle of a group of 5 to 7 parachutists jumping from the airplane. After deploying his parachute, he maneuvered to parallel the runway. He was watching for another parachutist at about the same altitude. He initiated a left turn on approach to eventually land into the wind. Winds were light at 3 to 5 knots. His approach path crossed the approach end of runway 32. Suddenly he observed the airplane "coming at me." He was about 75 feet AGL when he first observed the airplane. The airplane's wing contacted his parachute and he landed and the airplane crashed.

Two witnesses reported that the parachutist's glide path crossed the approach end of runway 32. One of these witnesses reported that the right wing caught the parachute's suspension lines, causing the airplane to crash and the parachutist to be thrown to the ground. The airplane crashed in a nose-first attitude. Also, one witness reported that the pilot was performing his third touch-and-go landing of the flight.

The pilot, age 87, did not possess a current FAA medical certificate. His most recent medical certificate was a third class certificate issued on February 8, 2010. He also could not provide evidence of a current flight review as required by 14 CFR Part 61.56. He was a resident of the fly-in community where the accident occurred.

FAA Advisory Circular (AC) 90-66A, paragraph 9e, addresses the subject of parachute operations at airports without operating control towers: "When a drop zone has been established on an airport, parachutists are expected to land within the drop zone. At airports that have not established drop zones, parachutists should avoid landing on runways, taxiways, aprons, and their associated safety areas. Pilots and parachutists should both be aware of the limited flight performance of parachutes and take steps to avoid any potential conflicts between aircraft and parachute operations."

14 CFR Part 105 addresses parachute operations. Section 105.5 (General), states: "No person may conduct a parachute operation, and no pilot in command of an aircraft may allow a parachute operation to be conducted from an aircraft, if that operation creates a hazard to air traffic or to persons or property on the surface.

The FAA Airport/Facility Directory, current at the time of the accident, noted under airport remarks, "Parachute jumping and ultralight activity invof arpt."

NTSB Identification: ERA14LA146
 14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, March 08, 2014 in Mulberry, FL
Aircraft: CESSNA 170B, registration: N211R
Injuries: 2 Minor.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On March 8, 2014, about 1103 eastern standard time (EST), a Cessna 170B, N211R, collided with the ground following an in-flight collision with a skydiver and parachute at South Lakeland Airport (X49), Mulberry, Florida. The private pilot and the skydiver received minor injuries. The airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was operated by the pilot. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the personal flight, and no flight plan was filed. The local flight originated about 1045.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the pilot was in the local traffic pattern and was performing a full stop landing. While on short final, the airplane struck the lines of the parachute as the skydiver was descending. The airplane pitched up, then down and impacted the turf runway in a nose down attitude. There was no fire. The pilot and the skydiver were taken to a local hospital for treatment of their injuries.

Reportedly, the skydiver involved in the accident was the fourth to leave the jump aircraft. The pilot reportedly did not see the skydiver prior to the collision. The pilot was a resident of the fly-in community at the airport. He was also aware that skydiving operations were in progress during his flight.


AIRCRAFT ON LANDING CRASHED WHEN IT BECAME ENTANGLED WITH AN OPEN PARACHUTE, THE PERSON ON BOARD SUSTAINED MINOR INJURIES, THE PARACHUTIST SUSTAINED MINOR INJURIES, LAKELAND AIRPORT, MULBERRY, FL 

http://registry.faa.gov/NN211R

MULBERRY (FOX 13) -   Two men were hurt Saturday morning when a plane collided with the parachute of a skydiver in Mulberry.

The Polk County Sheriff's Office says the pilot, 87-year-old Sharon Trembley, a World War II veteran, was doing touch-and-goes in his private Cessna at the South Lakeland Airport; that's when a plane touches down briefly then takes off again.

During his third pass, the passenger side wing of his plane clipped a skydiver's parachute, cutting the chute and tossing the skydiver into the air about 75-feet above the ground.

"I have never seen anything like this and this is the last thing I thought I'd see today," said Tim Telford, who took pictures of the midair collision as it happened.

The skydiver, 49-year-old John Frost of Gainesville, was flung to the earth. The plane nose-dived into the ground.

"I thought they were both seriously hurt. We rushed over there," said Paul Fuller, one of Trembly's friends who was also watching from the ground. "He's a pretty good pilot. He's been flying all of his life, probably 60 some-odd years."

Both men were taken to the hospital. Neither was seriously injured.

Frost was treated and released. Trembley was being held for observation.

"You always hear the negatives about somebody died or somebody this, that or the other. Both these guys  walked away unscathed," Telford said. "A scratch here, a bruise there and I think both are just happy to be here today."

The National Traffic and Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration are investigating the accident.
































































































































Plane crashes after getting tangled with parachutist in Lakeland 

 A plane crashed and a skydiver was injured when the aircraft got tangled in the parachutist’s strings, the Polk County Sheriff’s Offfice said today.

About 11 a.m., Shannon L.  Trembley, 87, of Mulberry was doing “touch and goes,” landing and taking off again without stopping, in his private Cessna at the South Lakeland Airport near 7500 Coronet Road in the Mulberry area, deputies said. During his third pass, however, the plane’s passenger-side wing got tangled in the strings of parachutist John S. Frost, 49, of Gainesville, who was about 75 feet above the ground.

Frost was thrown to the ground, and the plane nose-dived and crashed, deputies said.

Both men were taken to Lakeland Regional Medical Center, where Frost was treated and released. Trembley is being held for observation. Neither received serious injuries, deputies said.

The National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration were notified and will investigate the incident, deputies said.

Source:  http://tbo.com

A skydiving accident leaves Shannon Trembley and John Frost in hospital in Mulberry

Polk County, Florida -- A pilot and a skydiver are in the hospital after a flying accident in Mulberry.

Around 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, March 8, Shannon Trembley was doing "touch and goes" in his private Cessna from the South Lakeland Airport in the Mulberry area. Reportedly, during his third pass, the passenger-side wing of his plane became entangled in and then cut the strings of a parachutist.

The parachutist, John S. Frost, was flung to the ground and the plane nose-dived into the ground.

The incident occurred at around 75 feet above the ground.

Both men were transported by ambulance to LRMC.  Frost was treated and released and Trembley is being held for observation. Neither received serious injuries.

The NTSB and FAA were notified and have responded to the scene. They will investigate the incident.

Source:   http://www.wtsp.com

Skydiver, Pilot Treated After Midair Accident 

A plane became entangled in the strings of a skydiver's parachute, sending both crashing into the ground near Tampa, Fla., with both the pilot and jumper hospitalized with minor injuries.

Polk County Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Carrie Eleazer says 87-year-old pilot Shannon Trembley was doing takeoff and landing maneuvers Saturday in his Cessna at the South Lakeland Airport in Mulberry. On his third landing pass, the wing of his plane became entangled in the strings of 49-year-old Gainesville skydiver John Frost's parachute about 75 feet above the ground.

Frost was flung to the ground, and Trembley's plan nose-dived to the surface as well.

Eleazer says neither sustained serious injury, but went to the hospital. Frost was treated and released. Trembley was held for observations.

The National Transportation Safety Board and FAA are investigating.

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