Wednesday, September 07, 2022

Cessna R182 Skylane RG, N2263T: Incident occurred September 02, 2022 at Summersville Airport (KSXL), Nicholas County, West Virginia

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Charleston

Aircraft went off end of runway during landing, blew two (2) tires and struck a runway light. 

United States Air Force


Date: 02-SEP-22
Time: 15:57:00Z
Regis#: N2263T
Aircraft Make: CESSNA
Aircraft Model: 182
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
Operation: 91
City: SUMMERSVILLE
State: WEST VIRGINIA

12 comments:

  1. Maybe they were out of fuel and absolutely positively couldn't have gone around?

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    1. Maybe they just landed long and blew two tires trying trying to keep from going off the end of the R/W.

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    2. Yup, exactly. Maybe if they'd gone around, set up properly and not landed so long requiring heavy braking .... maybe there wouldn't be two blown tires, a runway overrun and broken airport infrastructure. That would certainly be less expensive; but yes, trying (and failing spectacularly) to salvage a landing is always your prerogative. Because avgas is expensive.

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    3. Great job Mr. NTSB, you cracked the case

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  2. Maybe aliens took over the controls. How about we wait for some factual information?

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  3. Typical going long and burning tires. Full flaps means little pressure on those main until speed decay.
    Why aren't there simple ABS systems for aircraft brakes is beyond me... even motorcycles have them now. They weigh a few oz.

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    Replies
    1. Most light jets and up have anti skid

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    2. They also have AC and amenities cars had decades ago for a fraction of the price and orders of magnitude better quality. Aviation is really an overpriced set of relics infested by rent-seeking in economic terms.

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  4. Anti skid won’t help you if you are fast and land long. It just helps with having two re-usable tires that add a slight resale value to the wreckage.

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    Replies
    1. At least it would eliminate flat tires during panicky situations where a pilot just hammers the brakes for no reason at all, or even when slight pedal pressure can lock the wheels given almost no weight on them right after landing and with full flaps and some speed.
      Large jets have anti-skid systems so the whole macho thing of "real pilots don't need ABS and don't need am airframe parachute" is getting tired frankly. The technology is there and cheap enough even in Aviation terms. And like always insurance company can send the message in $$$$ with massive premium reduction.

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    2. On a 182RG, 210 or 210A, 172RG and likely the 177RG you cannot use the brakes with the flaps down without at least flat-spotting the tiny tires. I had a student clamp on the brakes in a 182RG and popped both tires on the runway once. It is really not hard to do if you don't flip up the flap lever and wait a few seconds first.

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