Wednesday, April 27, 2022

Cirrus SR22 GTS Xi, N973SD: Incident occurred April 26, 2022 in Mansfield, Richland County, Ohio

 


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Cleveland, Ohio

Aircraft experienced engine issues and landed in a field. 

Cloud9 Aviation LLC


Date: 26-APR-22
Time: 15:10:00Z
Regis#: N973SD
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: NONE
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: MINOR
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: NORTH FAIRFIELD
State: OHIO

15 comments:

  1. One and half hours into the flight @ 2000ft, Cirrus recommends 2000 AGL for CAPS.

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  2. Great job! And he gets to use the airplane again!

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  3. I drove up to see where he put it down and for as wet of a spring as we have had that field was perfect. Crazy to see that thing just sitting out in the middle of the field. Looks like he did a great job.

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    1. I know this pilot personally. He is exceptionally careful and safe. He made a great decision here.

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  4. Heard his mayday from FL380. He was very calm and informative over 121.5 and the time between his mayday and reporting he was safely on the ground couldn’t have been more than one minute. Great job.

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  5. He is the President of our flying club..... he is a great pilot!

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  6. I was operating a Delta 757 into DTW and we heard their mayday call on 121.5. He said he was going to put it in a field and a lot of folks were attempting to help the guy. I kept listening and it sounded like he radioed that he was OK and everyone was congratulating him. I wrote down the tail number for later. Glad to hear a good outcome.

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    1. I am just seeing this after the incident from 4/26. Thanks for caring enough to write your post. You can check out the incident on YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vRbDAkTtoGQ I was so humbled by all the 121 pilots that got involved. What a great community.

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  7. Thank you for the thoughtful and insightful video. I spent 35 years in an operating room. What you say about trusting your training, doing drills in your head and maintaining focus is genuine. It applies everywhere. Great job!

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  8. That is a great video. Thank you for that. Did you find out what the problem was with the engine that day?

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    1. At 15:53 in the video it looks like a rod punched through the engine block. It is difficult from the still photo to know for certain.

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    2. Sure enough. That is definitely a rod end minus wrist pin sticking up at the right side of the still image. Might also be seeing a piston remnant down in the foreground there, turned 90 degrees from normal.

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    3. The connecting rod blew through the case. As to why it happened is still in process. Thanks for your patience.

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  9. Finally a Cirrus that landed on its "feet" and own power

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    Replies
    1. Soil condition was just right to support that nose wheel without ripping the wheel pant off. A very fortuitous spot to make a landing.

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