Monday, November 23, 2020

Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N99HV: Accidents occurred November 20, 2020 and June 10, 2017 at Lawrence Municipal Airport (KLWC), Douglas County, Kansas

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. 

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Wichita, Kansas

Aerohawk LLC


Location: Lawrence, KS 
Accident Number: CEN21LA066
Date & Time: November 20, 2020, 14:50 Local 
Registration: N99HV
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

On November 20, 2020, about 1450 central standard time, a Cessna 172S, N99HV, was substantially damaged when it was involved in an accident near Lawrence, Kansas. The pilot was not injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight.

According to the student pilot, he planned a solo flight. The instructor checked the plane out from the flight school, and indicated that he would be with another student, but would be available on the radio, if the student needed anything.

The student pilot reported that he didn't notice anything unusual during the pre-fight inspection and proceeded through the checklist for obtaining weather and runway information. The pilot added that that he finished the runup and magneto checks, manipulated the control yoke through its full range of motion, and set the radio frequency before takeoff.

The pilot reported the nose pitched up and airplane climbed much faster than expected which he attributed to the weight difference from being solo rather than with an instructor in the airplane. He added it felt like he had to apply a lot of forward pressure on the yoke to keep the nose down, more than he was used to, so he double checked the trim wheel, adding that it felt like I was out of trim, but the wheel was centered where he set it during pre-flight.

He stayed in the traffic pattern and on final he pitched the nose of the airplane for airspeed while monitoring power and elevation. He reduced the engine throttle and prepared to land. He stated he was centered on the runway and pulled back on the yoke for the flare. The yoke suddenly came back, and the nose pitched very high. The pilot added that he didn't expect this sudden pitch change and was preparing to add full throttle for a go-around when the airplane stalled and landed hard.

After landing the pilot moved the yoke through the full range forward and backward to check the functionality. He stated that he did not notice the same "pop" forward and backward like he did during the previous landing, so he taxied back for another takeoff. He stated that during the initial climb there was a noticeable change in the yoke pressure, and it was difficult to apply enough forward pressure to keep the nose down.

He then turned from base to final and lined up for the landing. The pilot again reported that it was very difficult to control the pitch and airspeed and the yoke seemed to push either forward or backward over some type of "stuck" point, so he selected full flaps on final. After he initiated the landing flare, there was again a noticeable "snap" back of an inch or two of the yoke. The main gear landed first, however; the nose wheel came down very fast. The pilot reported that the yoke was as far back as it he could hold it, but the airplane didn't seem to be responding to the control input.

An inspection of the airplane noted damage to the airplane’s nose gear and substantial damage to the firewall and fuselage.

An examination of the airplane’s flight controls is pending.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N99HV
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None
Operator Designator Code:

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: VMC
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLWC 
Observation Time: 13:52 Local
Distance from Accident Site: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C /4°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots / , 70°
Lowest Ceiling: Broken / 9000 ft AGL
Visibility: 10 miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.31 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Lawrence, KS (LWC) 
Destination: Lawrence, KS

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.009273,-95.212902 (est)



Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:

Location: Lawrence, Kansas
Accident Number: GAA17CA351
Date & Time: June 10, 2017, 11:00 Local 
Registration: N99HV
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Hard landing
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General aviation - Instructional

Analysis

The flight instructor reported that, during a simulated engine failure in the traffic pattern, with gusting wind conditions, the student pilot entered a forward slip on final approach. He added that 10 to 20 ft above the runway surface, "the wind gust we were riding suddenly halted wherein the aircraft began a rapid downward descent." The flight instructor reported that he "went for the flight controls to take command," but the student pilot at that same time applied back pressure on the flight controls. Subsequently, the airplane touched down hard, bounced, and the flight instructor performed a go around. The flight instructor completed the subsequent traffic pattern and landing without further incident.

The engine mounts and firewall sustained substantial damage.

The flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane that would have precluded normal operation.

An automated weather observation station at the airport reported that, about the time of the accident, the wind was from 170° at 16 knots, gusting to 24 knots. The flight instructor reported that the landing was on runway 15.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The student pilot's incorrect control application during landing after a simulated engine failure, which resulted in a hard, bounced landing, and the flight instructor's delayed action to perform a go-around in gusting wind conditions.

Findings
Personnel issues Incorrect action performance - Student/instructed pilot
Personnel issues Aircraft control - Student/instructed pilot
Aircraft Descent/approach/glide path - Not attained/maintained
Personnel issues Delayed action - Instructor/check pilot
Personnel issues Use of equip/system - Student/instructed pilot
Environmental issues Gusts - Effect on operation

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing Simulated/training event
Landing Other weather encounter
Landing Loss of control in flight
Landing Attempted remediation/recovery
Landing Hard landing (Defining event)

Flight instructor Information

Certificate: Commercial; Flight instructor
Age: 22,Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine land; Single-engine sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None 
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane single-engine; Instrument airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: May 20, 2014
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: March 11, 2017
Flight Time: (Estimated) 605 hours (Total, all aircraft), 312 hours (Total, this make and model), 450 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 168 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 65 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 4 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student pilot Information

Certificate: Student 
Age: 53,Male
Airplane Rating(s): None 
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None 
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With waivers/limitations 
Last FAA Medical Exam: August 18, 2015
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time: (Estimated) 71 hours (Total, all aircraft), 71 hours (Total, this make and model), 6 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 16 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 6 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N99HV
Model/Series: 172 S 
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2005 
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S10090
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: February 3, 2017 AAIP 
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 5813.9 Hrs at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: C91A installed, not activated 
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-L2A
Registered Owner:
Rated Power: 180 Horsepower
Operator: 
Operating Certificate(s)  Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual (VMC)
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KLWC,833 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 15:52 Local 
Direction from Accident Site: 0°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility: 10 miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 16 knots / 24 knots 
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual:  / None
Wind Direction: 170° 
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual:  / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.79 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 27°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: LAWRENCE, KS (LWC ) 
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: LAWRENCE, KS (LWC )
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 09:50 Local
Type of Airspace: Class E

Airport Information

Airport: LAWRENCE MUNI LWC 
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 833 ft msl 
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 15 
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5700 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full stop;Go around;Simulated forced landing;Traffic pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries:
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A 
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None 
Latitude, Longitude: 39.011112,-95.216392(est)

1 comment:

  1. As many of you know he should've increased his published approach speed by at least half the gust factor or 12 kts, among other things.

    ReplyDelete

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