Wednesday, March 25, 2020

Maule MT-7-235, N899ZZ: Fatal accident occurred March 23, 2020 in Atlantic Ocean near Swansboro, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N899ZZ

Location: Swansboro, NC
Accident Number: ERA20LA134
Date & Time: 03/23/2020, 2103 EDT
Registration: N899ZZ
Aircraft: Maule MT-7
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On March 23, 2020, at 2103 eastern daylight time, a Maule MT-7-235 airplane, N899ZZ, was destroyed when it was involved in an accident in the Atlantic Ocean near Swansboro, North Carolina. The pilot and the passenger were presumed fatally injured. The airplane was operated as a Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 personal flight.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate for single-engine airplanes with an instrument rating. According to fuel receipts and the manager of the Orangeburg Municipal Airport (OGB), Orangeburg, South Carolina, the airplane and pilot were based at the OGB airport, and at 1820 the pilot added about 40 gallons of 100-low lead fuel to the accident airplane.

Preliminary radar data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the pilot departed OGB at 1835, and subsequently landed at Mount Pleasant Regional Airport-Faison Field (LRO), Mount Pleasant, South Carolina at 1905. The pilot then filed an instrument flight rules flight plan and departed to Michael J. Smith Field Airport (MRH), Beaufort, North Carolina, at 1950. The pilot was in contact with air traffic control (ATC) after he departed LRO and radar data showed that the airplane climbed to 5,000 ft mean sea level (msl) and proceeded directly on course to MRH shortly after takeoff.

The route of flight was primarily over the Atlantic Ocean, and the course and altitude showed little deviation until about 2102, when the flight track showed a right turn to the southeast. The airplane continued in a rapidly descending right turning spiral until radar contact was lost. The last radar point at 2103:31 showed the airplane flying at 108 knots groundspeed, headed 131°, at 925 ft msl at latitude 34.43809891°, longitude -77.05209351°.

Review of preliminary ATC communications provided by the Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, Cherry Point, North Carolina, revealed that the pilot's communications were routine until radar contact was lost. About 2048, the pilot checked in with Cherry Point ATC at 5,000 ft, reported he had the weather at MRH and requested the RNAV 26 instrument approach procedure. The pilot was told to expect the RNAV approach, and about 2050, the pilot was instructed to fly direct to CIGOR, which was a GPS waypoint on the RNAV 26 approach. The pilot acknowledged the instructions and no further communications were received from the pilot; ATC attempted to reach the pilot several times after radar contact was lost, but no response was received.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard mission's coordinator, small debris fragments from the airplane were located at 2335, about 1.55 nm southeast of the last radar point at a position of latitude 34.416924°, longitude -77.034092° (see figure 1). The pilot and passenger were not located.

Figure 1: The airplane's final 3-minutes of flight track data (red line) and location of debris (white arrows show the airplane's direction of travel).

According to FAA airman records, the pilot completed the FAA basic medical certification on April 15, 2019. The pilot's most recent third-class FAA medical certificate was issued on September 7, 2016, where the pilot reported he had accumulated 179 hours of total flight time.

According to FAA airworthiness records, the 4-seat, single-engine, high-wing airplane was powered by a Lycoming IO-540-W1A5 235-horsepower engine. The most recent annual inspection was completed on August 29, 2019.

The 2058 recorded weather observation at MRH (the pilots destination), located about 25 miles northeast of the airplane's last known position, included an overcast ceiling at 1,800 ft above ground level (agl), visibility 10 statute miles, wind 240° at 6 knots, temperature was 16° C, and dew point was 13° C.

According to the flight crew of the U.S. Coast Guard aircraft that supported the search and rescue, about 2345 near the debris, they observed an overcast ceiling of 1,400 ft, visibility 10 miles, wind 290° at 10 knots, and a wave height of 4 ft.

As of this publication, no major components of the airplane have been located. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Maule
Registration: N899ZZ
Model/Series: MT-7 235
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built:No 
Operator: Carolina Training & Safety LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Night/Dark
Observation Facility, Elevation: NJM, 21 ft msl
Observation Time: 2057 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 15 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 16°C / 13°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots / , 220°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1700 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Mount Pleasant, SC (LRO)
Destination: Beaufort, NC (MRH)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: Unknown
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: Unknown
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  34.416944, -77.034167

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Richard Moncrief Nickel

Richard Moncrief Nickel, 43, of Cameron, passed away Monday, March 23, 2020.

A Memorial Service at Resurrection Lutheran Church of Cameron will be held at a later date, as well as a Celebration of Life Service.

Richard was born April 29, 1976, in Orangeburg, and was the son of Richard Scott Nickel and the late Marjorie Brailsford Nickel. He graduated from Calhoun Academy, had an Associate’s Degree in Engineering, and was President of Carolina Bridge Company, Inc. He was Chairman of the Carolina’s AGC Highway Committee and a member of Resurrection Lutheran Church of Cameron.

Survivors include his father, Richard Scott Nickel, of Beaufort; two children, Arleigh Nickel and George Nickel, of Cameron; his brother, Scott McDaniel “Dan” Brailsford Nickel (Amy), of Ridgeville; two nieces, Isabella Nickel and Julianna Nickel, of Ridgeville; an uncle, John “Johnny” Francis Brailsford, Jr. (Janet), of Orangeburg; his aunts, Florence “Florie” Brailsford, of The Oaks, and Elizabeth Brailsford Pierce (Mike), of Ruffin, Leigh Anne Nickel (Charles), of Davie, FL, and Janis Lane Nickel (Danny), of Anderson; his step-grandmother, Barbara Bly Nickel, of Greenville; and two step-aunts, Brenda Bly Baitinger (David), of Coral Gables, and Teresa Bly Garrick (Tommy), of Greer. He was pre-deceased by: his mother, Marjorie Brailsford Nickel; his maternal grandparents, John Francis Brailsford, Sr. and Lillian Marjorie “Ninkie” Brailsford; his uncle, Billy Brailsford; and his paternal grandparents, Richard F. Nickel and Elizabeth Gates Nickel.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorials may be made to: Resurrection Lutheran Church of Cameron, 8160 Old State Road, Cameron, SC 29030.

https://www.dukesharleyfuneralhome.com

This is a graphic of the combined search patterns conducted by Coast Guard assets March 24th, 2020, during a search for two missing persons after their aircraft was reported to have gone down 13 miles southeast of Bogue Inlet, North Carolina. Coast Guard watchstanders were initially notified of the incident by Air Traffic Control Cherry Point, who reported that an aircraft had dropped from their radar. 


EMERALD ISLE — A public affairs officer at the United States Coast Guard 5th District office in Portsmouth, Virginia, said Wednesday morning that searchers identified a debris field they believe is from a Maule MT-7-235 aircraft that crashed in the ocean with two people onboard Monday night.

Petty Officer Shannon Kearney said the debris field and crash site are 13 miles south of Bogue Inlet, off Emerald Isle.

She said the Coast Guard’s search and rescue effort, suspended late Tuesday, will resume if any new information warrants it.

Petty Officer Kearney said the airplane took off from Orangeburg, South Carolina, bound for Beaufort. She did not know when the plane left South Carolina or when it was expected to land in Beaufort.

The people onboard the plane have not been identified.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina watchstanders were initially notified by Air Traffic Control Cherry Point that an aircraft reportedly dropped from its radar Monday at about 11 p.m.

The Coast Guard said crews yesterday searched a combined 676.3 square miles over air, sea and land.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating 

(Previous report)

EMERALD ISLE — The U.S. Coast Guard announced about 9:15 p.m. Tuesday it had suspended its search for two missing people involved in a reported Maule M-7-235 crash in the ocean about 12 miles from Bogue Inlet.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina watchstanders were initially notified by Air Traffic Control Cherry Point that an aircraft reportedly dropped from their radar Monday at about 11 p.m.

The Coast Guard said crews searched a combined 676.3 square miles over air, sea and land.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the cause of the accident, and the search has been suspended pending the development of new information.

(Previous report)

EMERALD ISLE — Crews from the U.S. Coast Guard are searching for survivors of a Monday evening plane crash near Emerald Isle.

According to the Tuesday morning release, a Maule M-7-235 reportedly crashed southeast of Bogue Inlet, near Emerald Isle around 11 p.m. Two people were reportedly on board.

The release from the Coast Guard states watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector North Carolina command center received a call from air traffic control at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point after the Cessna dropped off radar 12 miles southeast of Bogue Inlet at approximately 11 p.m. Monday.

The Coast Guard launched an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Marine Corps Air Station Elizabeth City, a C-130 Hercules aircraft from Air Station Elizabeth City, a 45-foot Response Boat — Medium from Coast Guard Station Emerald Isle and Coast Guard Fast Response Cutter Nathan Bruckenthal.

Around 2 p.m. Tuesday, officials said they were “still searching.”

Emerald Isle Town Manager Matt Zapp said the Coast Guard was in charge of all search and rescue efforts related to the crash.

“None of our team are involved,” he said. “It was well off the coast, 12 miles, so it’s a Coast Guard issue.”

Original article ➤https://www.carolinacoastonline.com



EMERALD ISLE, Carteret County — The Coast Guard has suspended its search for two missing people involved in a Maule MT-7-235 airplane crash near Bogue Inlet.

Coast Guard Sector North Carolina watchstanders were initially notified of the incident by Air Traffic Control Cherry Point that an aircraft reportedly dropped from their radar on Monday evening.

Coast Guard personnel say they searched a combined total of 676.3 square miles over air, sea, and land.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating the cause of the incident, and the search has been suspended pending the development of new information.

Previous Story:

Coast Guard crews are searching for survivors after a Maule MT-7-235 airplane crashed southeast of Bogue Inlet, near Emerald Isle, North Carolina, late Monday evening.

Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector North Carolina command center received a call from Air Traffic Control Cherry Point at approximately 11:00 p.m. that an aircraft had dropped from their radar 12 miles southeast of Bogue Inlet. The aircraft had two people onboard, according to officials.

Officials say the plane was traveling to Beaufort from Orangeburg, South Carolina. As of Tuesday afternoon, the Coast Guard says this is a search and rescue effort, not a search and recovery.

“Six hundred and seventy-six square miles have been searched unsuccessfully, unfortunately," explains Petty Officer 2nd Class Jeffrey McConnell. "But, we still have the helicopter and the Nathan Bruckenthal are still on scene continuing the search for survivors at this point.”

McConnell says there is no information on the names of the two people who were aboard the plane or the flying conditions at the time of the crash.

The Coast Guard has launched crews onboard the following assets to search:
  • an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Air Station Elizabeth City,
  • a C-130 Hercules aircraft from Air Station Elizabeth City,
  • a 45-foot Response Boat — Medium from Station Emerald Isle,
  • Coast Guard Fast Response Cutter Nathan Bruckenthal.
Original article can be found here ➤ https://wcti12.com

3 comments:

  1. It appears that Richard Nickel, one of the owners of Carolina Bridge Company, was one of the victims of this crash. I can find no pilot certificate for him so there must have been another soul on board with a rating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I found Mr. Nickels pilot info. He was the pilot. His girlfriend was the passenger. RIP

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  2. Bad news ... I have met Richards dad a few times a few years ago.

    Just speculation ... we will probably never know ... loss of vacuum pump or attitude indicator leading to spacial disorientation or maybe just spacial disorientation.

    RIP and may the family members find peace.

    ReplyDelete