Thursday, November 7, 2019

Cirrus SR22 GTS X G3 Turbo, N220MT: Fatal accident occurred November 07, 2019 near Cable Airport (KCCB), San Bernardino County, California

Esmail Soltani 


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside

Aircraft crashed while on approach.


https://registry.faa.gov/N220MT


Date: 07-NOV-19

Time: 19:15:00Z
Regis#: N220MT
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: FATAL
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: PERSONAL
Flight Phase: APPROACH (APR)
Operation: 91
City: UPLAND
State: CALIFORNIA

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


It was just before 11 a.m. Thursday, and it was nap time. Except that Emmitt Tonello, who turns 2 in January, wanted to play. So his dad, Matthew, took him outside their Upland home for a while before coming inside, into the kitchen.

Just then, a single-engine airplane crashed into the house, bursting into flames, killing the pilot and destroying the Overland Court house. The rooms where Emmitt and his dad would have been sleeping were obliterated. But the two were just far enough away from the impact that Matthew was able to grab Emmitt and run out the back way as flames curled around the walls toward them.

Tonello, 32, said he saw the shadow of the plane approaching nearby Cable Airport growing close and heard the engine go “pop pop” before the plane hit the house.

“As soon as I heard the explosion I dropped to the ground and looked at my baby and saw the look on his face. He was terrified,” Tonello said. “I didn’t think of anything other than running toward him, grabbing him off the couch and running out the back.”

Words failed Tonello when he tried to describe the sound: “The craziest, nastiest way to describe the explosion, that’s it.”

Neither was injured, although Tonello has been coughing quite a bit recently, perhaps, he said, because of the smoke.

He said that he was grateful that his wife, Heather, 41, and daughters Lyndi, 16, and Kessid, 13, were not at home.

Tonello said even though he “could throw a rock” and hit the airport, “I would never have imagined in a million years a plane crashing into the house.”

The family lost some irreplaceable items, including wedding and honeymoon videos and film Tonello shot of Emmitt’s birth. His wedding ring, which he removes at home, is somewhere in the rubble.

The family’s clothes and computers were destroyed. A GoFundMe page titled, “A plane crash destroyed our family’s home” is raising money to replace those items. Tonello was speaking Friday as he drove home with a crib a friend had given him and said he was grateful for the assistance his family has received so far.

“I’m sorry for the pilot who lost his life,” Tonello said. “My prayers go out to his family, but I’m just blessed that my entire family was out and nobody was hurt.”

Meanwhile, on Friday, investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board began sifting through the wreckage.

The NTSB will be looking at the condition of the plane, the area around the crash, the weather at the time of the accident, the pilot’s flying record and the plane’s maintenance log as investigators try to determine what led to the crash, said Terry Williams, NTSB spokesman. They also will be interviewing witnesses.

“We are in the early stages, the fact-gathering phase,” Williams said. The NTSB may release a preliminary report in a week or 10 days, he said. A full report will take about a year or more.

The pilot died when the aircraft fell from the sky on Thursday.

More than half of the ranch house was reduced to charred rubble. The roof of the living room caved in but the eastern part of the house appeared untouched.

Firefighters said the pilot was believed to be the only person on board the plane. The craft was identified as a Cirrus SR22, FAA spokesman Ian Gregor said. The pilot’s identity had not been publicly announced as of Friday night.

The four-seater plane was flying from Zamperini Field in Torrance to Cable Airport in Upland, located about two miles from the Upland neighborhood where the plane crashed. It had flown from Palm Springs to Torrance on Wednesday, Gregor said.

The plane is registered to a licensed pilot with an address in Palos Verdes Estates, FAA records show.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dailybulletin.com








Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board on Friday began sifting through the wreckage of a single-engine plane that crashed into a home in Upland.

The NTSB will be looking at the condition of the plane, the area around the crash, the weather at the time of the accident, the pilot’s flying record and the plane’s maintenance log as investigators try to determine what led to the crash, said Terry Williams, NTSB spokesman. They also will be interviewing witnesses.

“We are in the early stages, the fact-gathering phase,” Williams said. The NTSB may release a preliminary report in a week or 10 days, he said. A full report will take about a year or more.

The pilot of a Cirrus SR22 GTS X G3 Turbo plane died when the aircraft fell from the sky on November 7th, crashing into the home and setting it on fire.

Two adults and a young child inside the house escaped the flames and were not injured.

More than half of the ranch house at 1257 Overland Court was reduced to charred rubble. The roof of the living room caved in but the eastern part of the house appeared untouched.

Firefighters said the pilot was believed to be the only person onboard the plane.

The plane was flying from Zamperini Field in Torrance to Cable Airport in Upland, located about two miles from the Upland neighborhood where the plane crashed. It had flown from Palm Springs to Torrance on Wednesday, Gregor said.

The plane is registered to a licensed pilot with an address in Palos Verdes Estates, FAA records show. The identity of the pilot has not yet been released.


Story and video ➤ https://www.dailybulletin.com

Cirrus SR22 GTS X G3 Turbo, N220MT 

  Cirrus SR22 GTS X G3 Turbo, N220MT


News briefing with National Transportation Safety Board safety investigator.






























National Transportation Safety Board investigators were in Upland Friday to help determine what caused a single-engine plane to plummet from the sky and crash through the roof of a home Thursday, killing the pilot on board.

Officials have not determined what caused the Cirrus SR22 GTS X G3 Turbo to go down. The pilot who was killed in the crash has not been identified.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the coroner’s office are among the agencies involved in the investigation.

Witnesses believe the low-flying plane may have been trying to make a U-turn back to Cable Airport in Upland just before it crashed into the home in the 1200 block of West Overland Court.

One neighbor said the “whole house was engulfed” as she and her husband were running out of their home.

"Witnesses reported seeing the airplane flying low and slow, before it turned and descended rapidly into the house," Samantha Link, an investigator with the NTSB, said during a Friday morning news conference.

She said a team of investigators are documenting the evidence left at the scene before the plane is removed Friday afternoon and taken to a secure location, where it will be examined more closely.

Link said the plane was destroyed in the crash, but she did not elaborate on what was left of the aircraft.

"We currently have no idea what happened," she said.

The plane's parachute was deployed at some point during the crash, but it is unclear if the pilot pulled on it or it occurred from the impact, Link said.

The crash prompted a massive response from firefighters, who spent nearly two hours getting the situation under control.

On Thursday, the Federal Aviation Administration said the plane had taken off from nearby Cable Airport not long before it went down.

Family members said a father and his infant son were inside the home when the plane came crashing through part of the roof.

Although they were knocked to the ground, the two managed to escape the incident unharmed.

A GoFundMe page was set up to help raise money for the displaced family members as they search for temporary housing.

Story and video ➤ https://ktla.com

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Almost local daily flights out of KTOA.
https://flightaware.com/photos/view/29032-0135e65f15f6c183b9e9b83f34fc53e55757fd18/aircrafttype/CIRR

CFI no mo' said...

"Made a sharp U-turn" ... accelerated stall/spin ? Parachute deployed too low ?

billybobbobr said...

The way the chute is draped over the wall, could indicate discharge was caused by impact or fire.

Anonymous said...

Sad tragedy. I hope it's not another case of poor airmanship resulting in trying to use the Cirrus "get out of jail free card". Now I realize these chutes do save lives but it's possible this one would have been fatal regardless of the chute (i.e. accelerated stall at or below TPA).
Once you pull the big red handle you're not a pilot anymore, just a passenger. Glad no one on the ground was harmed.

Anonymous said...

Another low level stall/spin in a Cirrus.

Anonymous said...

That parachute cooked off after the crash. It would not be draped nicely over the side of the house if it had been deployed in the air...Sorry everyone.

MarcPilot said...

The SR20 and SR22 are quite capable business aircrafts geared towards part 135 operators in the 21th century (and may I say the BRS system is a good thing to tell potential paying PAX for marketing reasons, and sets it apart from any commercial flight with a B737 or airbus etc...).
It has tons of goodies for safety the FAA loves and getting an air taxi operator certificate with it seems to be a breeze for anyone considering that route, compared to trying to do it with a multi or rotorcraft. Good luck on the later...
Add to that it is not a retract and the same class and type as a Cessna 172 so insurance premiums are not stratospheric.
Sadly not everyone who flies it is a commercial pilot or a CFI with a good grasp of ADM and experience of other types of aircrafts. And this is where things get slippery... no amount of automation or parachute will save someone who does a foolish thing.
99% of crashes are due to pilot error... and odds are this one will be to pilot error too.

Anonymous said...

Parachute deployed after the crash.