Sunday, May 12, 2019

Beech 76 Duchess, instructional evaluation flight operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91, N6627U: Accident occurred December 30, 2016 at Marion County Airport (X35), Dunnellon, Florida


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N6627U




Location: Dunnellon, FL
Accident Number: ERA17LA077
Date & Time: 12/30/2016, 1010 EST
Registration: N6627U
Aircraft: BEECH 76
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Powerplant sys/comp malf/fail
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On December 30, 2016, at 1010 eastern daylight time, a Beech 76, N6627U, was substantially damaged during a forced landing after takeoff from Marion County Airport (X35), Dunnellon, Florida. The private pilot and designated pilot examiner (DPE) were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed, for the instructional evaluation flight operated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91. The flight was destined for the Crystal River Airport (CGC), Crystal River, Florida.

According to the private pilot, the purpose of the flight was to conduct the practical test for his commercial pilot certificate, with a rating for airplane multiengine land. The flight departed CGC about 0945, conducted some navigation and maneuvering exercises, and landed at X35. The pilot then performed a normal takeoff with a simulated right engine failure at an altitude of 800 feet above ground level, followed by a single-engine landing to a full stop. Next, the pilot performed a short-field takeoff from runway 5, which was 5,000 feet long by 100 feet wide).

About 100 feet above ground level, the pilot raised landing gear, heard a "thud," and seconds later the airplane began an "uncontrollable turn to the right much as one would expect from a right engine failure." The examiner took control of the airplane and determined it lacked the climb performance to clear the obstacles in its path. He then retarded the throttles and landed gear-up in the grass between the runway and the hangars on the east side of the airport. During the landing, the left wing struck a concrete drain and was substantially damaged.

According to the examiner, he took control due to a "delay in maintaining directional control" by the pilot.

The examiner held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land, airplane single- and multiengine sea, and glider. He also held flight and ground instructor certificates. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued on April 14, 2016, at which time he reported 24,600 total hours of flight experience.

The pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued on August 18, 2016. The pilot reported 2,100 total hours of flight experience.

Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration inspector revealed damage to the nose, propellers and fuselage belly. Flight control continuity was confirmed from each control surface to the cockpit controls. Examination of the right engine revealed that the single-drive dual magneto had separated from the accessory pad and was laying in the engine compartment. The two nuts and clamps used to attach the magneto to the mounting studs were missing. The mounting studs appeared undamaged.
Review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that the magneto was installed on December 10, 2014, about 466 flight hours prior to the accident. The most recent 100-hour inspection was performed on December 7, 2016, about 27 flight hours prior to the accident.

Review of 14 CFR 41, Appendix D, Scope and Detail of Items (as applicable to the particular aircraft) to be Included in Annual and 100-hour Inspections revealed, "…(7) (2) Studs and nuts – for proper torqueing and obvious defects…"

Review of engine failure after lift-off and in-flight information from an airplane make and model pilot operating handbook revealed, "An immediate landing is advisable regardless of take-off weight. Continued flight can not be assured if take-off weight exceeds the weight determined from the TAKE-OFF WEIGHT graph.



Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 26, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/05/2016
Occupational Pilot:
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  2145 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20 hours (Total, this make and model), 2037 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 18 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)



Check Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 89, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Multi-engine Sea; Single-engine Land; Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):Glider 
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s):
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s):  
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/14/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:  
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 24000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 24 hours (Total, this make and model), 23300 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 72 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 20 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: BEECH
Registration: N6627U
Model/Series: 76 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1979
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: ME-214
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 12/07/2016, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3900 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 27 Hours
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 10534 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: LO-360-A1G6D
Registered Owner: CRYSTAL AERO GROUP INC
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: CRYSTAL AERO GROUP INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None  



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KOCF, 87 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 0950 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 50°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 12 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 10°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.32 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / -6°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Dunnellon, FL (X35)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: CRYSTAL RIVER, FL (CGC)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1015 EST
Type of Airspace:



Airport Information

Airport: MARION COUNTY (X35)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 65 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 05
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 



Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude: 29.065000, -82.371111 (est)
























4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Textbook landing with mag falling off one engine. No injuries.

Anonymous said...

My textbook says something about identifying and feathering the failed engine and continuing the climb. These guys were 100' agl with the gear coming up, pretty late to aborting back to the runway. I didn't see any weight or performance numbers though. Glad they weren't injured.

Anonymous said...

Need to review poh before commenting on how to fly this aircraft.

Anonymous said...


This is right out of the above story, With these little engines(0360’s) to feather the critical engine and climb is not recommended. Procedure often referred to as chop and drop. Maybe with lightweight pilot only and low fuel load at sea level on a cool day you might be able to survive. I agree with first commenter. Second commenter please stay away from my airport.


“Review of engine failure after lift-off and in-flight information from an airplane make and model pilot operating handbook revealed, "An immediate landing is advisable regardless of take-off weight. Continued flight can not be assured if take-off weight exceeds the weight determined from the TAKE-OFF WEIGHT graph.”