Thursday, April 25, 2019

Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking 300A, personal flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N9693E: Fatal accident occurred April 23, 2019 at Henderson City-County Airport (KEHR), Kentucky

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity: 
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Louisville, Kentucky

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N9693E 

Location: Henderson, KY
Accident Number: ERA19FA155
Date & Time: 04/23/2019,  
Registration: N9693E
Aircraft: Bellanca 1730
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On April 23, 2019 at an unknown time, a Bellanca 17-30A, N9693E, was substantially damaged after impacting terrain at the Henderson City-County airport (EHR) Henderson, Kentucky. The student pilot and passenger were fatally injured. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. The flight departed from Mid Carolina Regional airport (RUQ), Salisbury, North Carolina.

According to the airplane owner, the airplane was for sale and the student pilot was interested in purchasing it. The student pilot had flown the airplane earlier in the day with a flight instructor. According to the student pilot's logbook, he and the instructor flew a cross-country flight from RUQ, to Spartanburg Memorial airport (SPA), Spartanburg, South Carolina, and back to RUQ. The flight time was logged as 1.4 hours.

Airport personnel at HER discovered the airplane shortly before 0700 central daylight time on April 24, 2019, as they prepared to open the airport. The airplane was in a grass area about midfield, 200 ft left of the runway 27 centerline. The airport had closed the previous evening at 1930. When closed, the pilot controllable runway lighting remains activated on its "low" setting, and the airport rotating beacon remains on from sunset to sunrise.

No eyewitnesses were identified; however, the state police received several calls the following day from witnesses who reported hearing either a low flying airplane or a "boom" sound at times between 2000 and 2230 on April 23, 2019.

Examination of the wreckage revealed that all major components of the airplane were present at the accident site and were confined to an area approximately 100 ft in diameter. 

The right wing leading edge was fragmented and separated from the wing, and found within a ground scar that was embedded in the grass oriented about 270° magnetic. 

The propeller hub was separated from the engine with all three blades attached, and was embedded in the mud oriented about 90° nose down near the inboard section of the right wing leading edge. 

The fuselage came to rest about 15 ft south of the right wing leading edge fragments, and was oriented perpendicular to the runway. 

The right wing was fractured about midspan with the outboard section partially separated. The two aluminum fuel tank cells in the right wing were damaged, but largely intact. 

Blue stains were found on the wood wing components below and forward of the tanks and surrounding the tank vent and the fuel quantity sensor. 

About 3 to 4 gallons of fuel was recovered from the right wing tanks. A placard on the tank filler neck read "34 GAL. 30 GAL. USABLE."

The fuel selector valve was found in the "RIGHT" tank position.

The left wing was largely intact. The fuel tanks were not damaged. 

About 2 ounces of fuel were recovered after pressurizing the tanks with air at the filler neck.

The forward fuselage was largely crush damaged and partially separated at the leading edge of the wing. The auxiliary fuel tank located behind the rear seats was undamaged and was devoid of fuel.

Flight control continuity was established from all primary flight control surfaces to their respective cockpit controls. Pitch trim control continuity was established from the trim tab to the damaged roof area of the cockpit.

The empennage largely undamaged.

The landing gear handle was in the "down" position and both main landing gear were extended with the doors open.

The nose landing gear was damaged and partially extended. There was no evidence of a post-crash fire.

All four engine mounts were fractured, and the engine was separated from the fuselage. 

The oil sump was crush damaged and breached near the drain plug, and a puddle of oil was found underneath the engine.

The top spark plugs were removed and the No. 1 through No. 4 plugs exhibited light grey colored combustion deposits, the Nos. 5 and 6 plugs exhibited darker black colored combustion deposits. 

All electrodes exhibited normal wear signatures when compared to the Champion Check-A-Plug chart. 

The fuel pump remained attached to the engine; the drive coupling was intact, and a few drops of fuel leaked from the fractured pump inlet fitting when the pump was removed from the engine. After priming, the fuel pump operated normally when turned with an electric drill. 

The fuel nozzles were removed and found to be free of obstruction. 

The engine was rotated by hand at the propeller flange using a leverage tool. 

Thumb compression and suction was observed on all six cylinders with proper valve movement established. 

Continuity throughout the engine and accessory section was established. Both magnetos were found separated from their mounting pads with their mounting flanges fractured. Both produced impulse coupling engagement and spark on all towers when rotated by hand. 

The fuel manifold valve was disassembled; the diaphragm was intact with no indication of leakage, the plunger and retaining nut were tight and secure, the fuel screen was clean, and the cavity contained a small amount of fuel. The air induction tubes were crush damaged. The air filter was not found. 

The throttle body and mixture control assembly was separated from the engine and remained near the firewall with the throttle and mixture control attached to their respective control arms.

The low-wing, 4-seat, high-performance complex airplane was manufactured in 1976. It was equipped with a 300-horsepower Continental IO-520K1A engine driving a Hartzell 3-bladed controllable pitch propeller.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airman records, the pilot held a student pilot certificate which was issued on February 9, 2018, with the standard limitation of "Carrying Passengers is Prohibited." According to his logbook, he had accumulated 24 hours of total flight experience, of which 23 hours were annotated as dual received, including 1.4 hours in the accident airplane. The logbook did not contain any endorsements for solo flight, or for operation of complex/high performance airplanes.

A preliminary review of weather conditions in the area overnight revealed some precipitation in the region between from 1900 and 2200 on April 23, 2019, and again between 0100 and 0200 on April 24, 2019. Visibility was consistently reported as 10 statute miles, with the skies clear or with scattered to broken cloud layers above 3,800 ft.

The airplane was retained for further examination. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: Bellanca
Registration: N9693E
Model/Series: 1730
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation:
Observation Time:
Distance from Accident Site:
Temperature/Dew Point:
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: / ,
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting:
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Salisbury, NC (RUQ)
Destination: 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 37.807222, -87.684444

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


Barry Alan Hill


Barry Alan Hill 47 of Sanford died April 23, 2019. Memorial services will be held Sunday April 28, 2019 at 4pm at Rogers Pickard Funeral Home.

Mr. Hill was born in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, son of the late Floyd Edward Hill and Carol Joyce Harper Hill. He was preceded in death by his grandmother Blanche Harper.

Mr. Hill is survived by his wife Cassandra Hillard Hill; daughter Bailey Hill, Randi Leslie and Kaylee Adams and a son Benjamin “Ben” Hill all of Sanford; grandchildren Natalynn Torres, Kace Daniels, Nathan McNeill and Jania Amerson; brothers Scott Hill (Christina) of Arkansas  and Mark Hill (Judy) of Pennsylvania; aunt, Dorothy Vance of Florida and a special friend Kelsey Blare Faulk and daughter Paisley of Sanford. 

The family has asked for contributions be made to Rogers Pickard Funeral Home to help with funeral.

https://www.rogerspickard.com


\
George Glenn Tucker

George Glenn Tucker, age 48, of Sanford, NC died Wednesday, April 24, 2019.

He was born in Tennessee to George W. Tucker and Christine Faulkner Kilburn.  His father preceded him in death.  George was a long-haul truck driver.

He is survived by his wife Joy Beth Parker Tucker of Sanford and his other family lives in Tennessee and Alabama and includes his mother Christine Faulkner Kilburn; daughter Cody Tucker; brother Marty D. Tucker; sister Gail Tucker and grandchild Carson Townsend.

The family will receive friends Wednesday, May 1, 2019 at Bridges-Cameron Funeral Home from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM.  A graveside service will follow at 1:30 PM at Buffalo Cemetery.

https://www.bridgescameronfuneralhome.com




HENDERSON, KENTUCKY — A large sum of cash and some suspected cocaine were found in the wreckage of a small plane that crashed in Kentucky, killing two men from Sanford, officials said Friday.


The bodies of George Glenn Tucker, 48, and Barry A. Hill, 47, were found Wednesday inside the Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking 300A. A maintenance worker at the Henderson City-Henderon County Airport in Henderson, Kentucky, found the plane early Wednesday morning crashed about 50 yards off the runway.

According to the Kentucky State Police, investigators believe George Glenn Tucker and Barry A. Hill were likely in the Henderson area looking for a fueling-stop to continue their journey. The Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking 300A ran out of fuel causing the engine to lose power.

"The Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking 300A fell nose first to the ground, ultimately killing both men," a Kentucky State Police news release said. Authorities believe Tucker was piloting the plane and Hill was the passenger, a news release said.

Troopers located several duffel bags containing personal belongings in the wreckage along with one duffel bag containing a large sum of cash and suspected cocaine, the release said.

The crash happened late Tuesday or early Wednesday, an official said.

Federal Aviation Administration records show that George Glenn Tucker held a student pilot's license that prohibited him from carrying passengers. 

The Federal Aviation Administration records also show the Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking 300A is registered in Mocksville, North Carolina, to Jonathan P. Byler. However, Federal Aviation Administration records have Byler's pilot's license registered to a Spartanburg, South Carolina address. Byler's wife, Marley, reportedly told a Kentucky news station Thursday that Tucker was a family friend who was storing her husband's plane.

The Kentucky State Police report does not state where investigators believe the men were headed, nor does it give an amount of cash or cocaine found in the wreckage.

Calls to a spokesman for the Kentucky State Police were not immediately returned on Friday.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://sanfordherald.com


Kentucky State Police Trooper Corey King and Henderson County Coroner Bruce Farmer.


HENDERSON, Kentucky - Authorities said a small plane that crashed here earlier this week, killing two people, was carrying drugs and cash.


The Kentucky State Police said in the wreckage from the downed Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking 300A -- which crashed Tuesday night or early Wednesday morning at the Henderson City County Airport -- officials found a duffel bag containing cash and suspected cocaine.


Killed in the crash were Barry A. Hill, 47, and George G. Tucker, 48, both of Sanford, North Carolina. 


Trooper Corey King, KSP Post 16's public information officer, said it's believed Tucker was piloting the plane and Hill was the passenger. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, Tucker was a student pilot who received his certification in February of 2018.


"Investigators believe Tucker and Hill were likely in the Henderson area looking for a fueling-stop to continue their journey," King said. "The Bellanca 17-30A aircraft ran out of fuel causing the engine to stall. The plane fell nose first to the ground ultimately killing both men."


Information on where the men were headed was not available.


On Thursday, the state police released that the plane had been stolen or its use unauthorized by the registered owner, according to a news release.


The Federal Aviation Administration identified the plane's owner as Jonathan P. Byler of Mocksville, North Carolina. The plane is believed to have been taken from somewhere in Davie County, North Carolina, which is home to the city of Mocksville.


The FAA said while Tucker may have been a student pilot, he was restricted from having passengers.


"It's a complicated plane to fly and the owner said you have to have experience with it," King said.


"It's nose-heavy and it has speed to it, but when the engine stalls and goes out, it drops and it drops nose first. Therefore, you've got to know how to handle it."


Henderson County Coroner Bruce Farmer said in speaking with Byler, investigators discovered that Byler knew Tucker as someone possibly interested in buying the Bellenca aircraft. Farmer said Tucker, accompanied by Byler, had test-flown the plane.


However, at the time the plane crashed in Henderson, the owner was not aware that his plane had been taken, the state police said.


Also on Thursday, the coroner's office released the preliminary autopsy results which reveal the cause of death was blunt force trauma. Farmer said toxicology results will not be ready for about six weeks.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.thegleaner.com



Henderson County Coroner Bruce Farmer points out on an aerial photograph where the plane crashed at the Henderson City-County Airport. The plane was found in a field about a 100 yards from the mid-point of the runway.


Kentucky State Police say a plane that crashed killing two North Carolina men was carrying drugs and cash.

Authorities believe the plane was stolen or used without permission from the owner. The Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking 300A crashed early Wednesday or Tuesday night at the Henderson City County Airport.


The Gleaner in Henderson reports police searched the wreckage and found a duffel bag with cash and suspected cocaine.


The crash killed 47-year-old Barry Hill and 48-year-old George Tucker, of Sanford, North Carolina.


State Trooper Corey King says investigators believe Tucker was piloting the plane and they were looking for a place to stop for fuel when it crashed. Tucker was a student pilot.


The plane's owner told authorities he had previously let Tucker test the plane because Tucker was interested in buying it.


ORIGINAL STORY 4/25/19


Kentucky State Police say they've identified two North Carolina men who died in a small plane crash in Kentucky and neither are certified pilots.


Police said in a statement Thursday that the plane they were flying is believed to have been either stolen or used without permission from the registered owner.


The statement identifies the men who died as 47-year-old Barry A. Hill and 48-year-old George Tucker, both of Sanford, North Carolina. Police say they think the private aircraft was taken from Rome, North Carolina.


Henderson City-County Airport workers discovered the wreckage around 7 a.m. Wednesday when the airport was opening.

Henderson County Coroner Bruce Farmer said the two occupants were found dead inside the plane and are believed to have died on impact.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsaz.com

Emergency personnel at the scene of a small plane crash that claimed the lives of two people at the Henderson City-County Airport on April 24th, 2019.

 

HENDERSON CO., Kentucky  - Kentucky State Police believe the two men killed in a plane crash were likely in the Henderson area looking for a fueling-stop to continue their journey.

They say the Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking 300A ran out of fuel causing the engine to stall. The plane fell nose first to the ground.


Troopers say they found several duffel bags containing personal belongings and one duffel bag with a large sum of cash and suspected cocaine.


Barry Hill, 47, and George Tucker, 48 were from Sanford, North Carolina.


“There’s a little bit of intelligence we have that offers a little bit of an idea that perhaps their destination might have been more northwest of the Commonwealth," KSP Trooper Corey King explains. "Either way, it doesn’t offer what the money was going to be used for, perhaps the drugs, was it for personal? Was it purchased? Was it for bartering? Or was it for simply trading off to anyone else? We don’t know this part.”


Neither of the men were fully licensed pilots. Investigators do believe Tucker, who does have a student license, was flying the plane.


Trooper King says they are looking through a cell phone they found on board more information. They’re also sending the drugs off for testing.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wect.com


HENDERSON, Kentucky – Kentucky State Police announced on Friday that investigators found a duffel bag containing a large sum of cash and suspected cocaine near the wreckage of an aircraft in Henderson.

Two men were found dead at the scene of the crash, 47-year-old Barry A. Hill and 48-year-old George Tucker, both of Sanford, North Carolina.


KSP said investigators believe Tucker and Hill were likely in the Henderson area looking for a fueling stop to continue their journey.


The Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking 300A the two men were flying ran out of fuel and caused the engine to stall, KSP said.


According to investigators, the plane fell nose-first to the ground – ultimately killing Hill and Tucker.


Several duffel bags were found containing personal belongings, authorities said. However, one duffel bag found contained money and suspected cocaine, KSP said.


On Thursday, the wife of the aircraft’s owner told WEHT the aircraft was not taken, but it was not authorized to be flown.


According to FAA records, the owner of the Bellanca 17-30A is Jonathan P Byler.


Byler's wife Marley told Eyewitness News in a phone interview that the aircraft was being stored by George Tucker, a family friend.


Marley said Tucker wasn't authorized to fly it.


According to FAA records, Tucker was a student pilot.


However, he was specifically prohibited from carrying passengers and flying at night.


KSP announced Thursday that the aircraft was believed to have either been stolen or its use was unauthorized by the registered owner.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.cbs17.com






HENDERSON, Kentucky (AP) — Kentucky State Police say a plane that crashed, killing two North Carolina men, was carrying drugs and cash.

Authorities believe the plane was stolen. The Bellanca 17-30A Super Viking 300A crashed late Tuesday night or early Wednesday morning at the Henderson City-County Airport.


Kentucky State Police said in a news release Friday that multiple duffel bags were found in the plane, and one bag contained suspected cocaine and a large amount of cash.


The crash killed 47-year-old Barry Hill and 48-year-old George Tucker, of Sanford, North Carolina.


Investigators say the plane ran out of fuel and fell nose first to the ground, news release said.


Trooper Corey King says investigators believe Tucker was piloting the plane, and they were looking for a place to stop for fuel when it crashed. Tucker was a student pilot.


The plane’s owner told authorities he had previously let Tucker test the plane, because Tucker was interested in buying it.

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Plane looks like a flat spin in the middle of the night. RIP to all involved.

Anonymous said...

So the plane wasn't "stolen" because the guy that took it knew the planes owner and most likely had the key since he was storing it for them. If he flew it without authorization how is that not stealing it? Wonder what they'll find during the autopsy toxicology reports? Neither man had a pilot's license or training and they're flying a HP plane like the Viking at night? To quote Forrest Gump,"stupid is as stupid does".

Anonymous said...


The insurance company will be glad to hear that the plane wasn't stolen and the flight was not authorized by the owner. The FAA will have a few questions though.

Anonymous said...


Now the real story is emerging, drugs and cash were found onboard. The planes owner may be changing their alibi soon.

Anonymous said...

Dewpoint spread two degrees, fog?

CFI no mo' said...

The owner letting a 'friend' store the plane for him - such a nice guy. Business partner more likely.

Anonymous said...

I grew up in Florida in the 1970s and 1980s during the peak of the drug runners in planes and boats (classic Miami Vice in real life). My Air Force base Aero Club had two former drug runner planes, both high performance twins, in their inventory: a Cessna 310 for initial twin training and a 414 for ATP training and introduction to pressurized flying. According to the chief pilot at the time (who signed me off for several ticekts), both of those aircraft were flown by non-rated pilots when they got caught by DEA. One thing he told me I'll never forget: you never really know who the bad guys are right under your nose and living next door to you.

Anonymous said...

But since this is America I still expect bloodthirsty lawyers to sue the government or ATC on behalf of the estates or families of the criminals.
I say people should sue lawyers back for such idiocies.

Jim B said...


My wife and I are greatful each day for our son who is cautious, kept himself out of trouble and done well in life.

Next time you get on an airliner you might find him (and others like him) flying your bird.

I feel sadness for the mothers/family of these two men who will only feel heartbreak for the trouble these men got into. Things could have been different.

Is the lure of quick (dirty) money worth the cost?


Anonymous said...

Im a friend of the family of the student pilot.Please be respectful of the men who died in the planewreck.The families are grieving and they are making it sound like it was something other than it was.Thankyou for understanding lives were lost and families were left behind

Anonymous said...

Thankyou for being respectful to the men who died

Anonymous said...

A student pilot flying a Bellanca Super Viking solo or at night is a recipe for disaster, keep investigating the owner of the aircraft.