Monday, April 22, 2019

Beechcraft 58 Baron, registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight, N501CE: Fatal accident occurred April 22, 2019 near Kerrville Municipal Airport (KERV), Kerr County, Texas

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; San Antonio, Texas
Continental Aerospace Technologies; Mobile, Alabama
Textron Aviation Inc; Wichita, Kansas

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

https://registry.faa.gov/N501CE

Location: Kerrville, TX
Accident Number: CEN19FA124
Date & Time: 04/22/2019, 0851 CDT
Registration: N501CE
Aircraft: Beech 58
Injuries: 6 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Business 

On April 22, 2019, at 0851 central daylight time, a Beech 58 airplane, N501CE, impacted terrain during approach to Kerrville Municipal Airport (ERV), Kerrville, Texas. The pilot and five passengers were fatally injured, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was registered to and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a business flight. Day instrument meteorological conditions prevailed for the flight, which departed on an instrument flight rules flight plan from West Houston Airport (IWS), West Houston, Texas, at 0730.

According to preliminary air traffic control (ATC) information, the airplane approached ERV and was cleared to fly the RNAV (GPS) Approach Runway 12. The controller advised the pilot that the cloud bases were reported at 2,400 ft mean sea level (msl) and subsequently directed him to switch to the common traffic advisory frequency at ERV. While on final approach, the airplane descended and the last location recorded by ATC was about six miles prior to Runway 12, about 2,050 ft msl and about 65 knots groundspeed.

Three witnesses noticed the airplane flying at a low altitude and a spiral descent. The airplane impacted into a rocky ravine with a low forward groundspeed and came to rest upright. The wreckage was contained within the footprint of the airplane and there was no post-impact fire. The airplane was retained for further examination at the recovery location.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Beech
Registration: N501CE
Model/Series: 58
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KERV, 1617 ft msl
Observation Time: 0855 CDT
Distance from Accident Site: 6 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 16°C
Lowest Cloud Condition:
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 11 knots / 17 knots, 170°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1200 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Departure Point: Houston, TX (IWS)
Destination: Kerrville, TX (ERV)

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 5 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 6 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 30.037500, -99.185833

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov. 


(clockwise from upper left) Jeffrey Weiss, Angela & Stuart Kensinger, Mark Scioneaux, Marc Tellepsen and Scott Reagan Miller.





HOUSTON - Six people were aboard a small airplane traveling from Houston to Kerrville on Monday when it crashed into a rocky patch of land just miles from its destination.

All six people were killed.

Authorities identified the victims as:

Jeffrey Carl Weiss, 65, of Houston (pilot)
Stuart Roben Kensinger, 55, of Houston
Angela Webb Kensinger, 54, of Houston
Mark Damien Scioneaux, 58, of Houston
Scott Reagan Miller, 55, of Houston
Marc Tellepsen, 45, of Houston

As the investigation into the crash begins, stories are being shared about the victims. Here’s what we’ve learned about them.

Pilot Jeffrey Weiss has several planes, three of which are kept at West Houston Airport, including the twin-engine Beechcraft BE58 plane that crashed Monday, according to the airport manager.

The manager said Weiss has flown for about 15 years and averaged about 40 hours of flight time a month, which equates to about 500 hours a year.

Weiss was well-known for his giving nature, the manager said. A majority of Weiss' flights were charitable acts -- such as picking up kids and people with medical issues and helping veterans travel. He also took part in a program to pick up stranded pilots.

The manager said he heard Weiss on the radio about 7:30 a.m. Monday 7:30 a.m. saying he was turning right and heading west.

Angela Kensinger was the women’s lacrosse coach at St. John’s High School in River Oaks, and her husband Stuart Roben Kensinger was in real estate.

People who knew the couple said they were going to look at property they owned in the area and were preparing to make renovations.

“There’s going to be a lot of heartache over the loss of these too,” said Meg Rice, a longtime neighbor of the Kensingers.

Mark Damien Scioneaux was the husband of Houston Ballet artistic director Stanton Welch, and was a landscaping architect at Tellepsen Landscaping Services for the past 11 years, according to LinkedIn.

Welch told KPRC2, "Mark was a deeply loved man. He was generous and creative and will be missed. He was a landscape architect who won many awards and was deeply embedded in the community. Houston was his home and he loved this city."

A funeral service is planned for Saturday at 1 p.m. and will be open to family and friends.

The Houston Ballet sent KPRC2 a statement that read, "Words cannot express the sadness our Houston Ballet family feels over the sudden loss of Mark Scioneaux and the other 5 lives lost in the tragic plane accident yesterday. We will dearly miss Mark, the loving husband of our artistic director, Stanton Welch AM. He was a true friend to each of us in our tight-knit ballet family. He exuded a genuine warmth, with a kindness and big heart that defined him. Simply put, everyone loved Mark. And, we will work to keep his memory, his love and his kind spirit alive."

According to LinkedIn, Marc Tellepsen also worked at Tellepsen Landscaping Services. He was listed as the operational manager. A photo of Tellepsen is not yet available for publication.

Scott Reagan Miller had been an architect in Houston for more than 20 years.


Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.click2houston.com


'''' 
HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) -- A Houston entrepreneur, an investment banker active in local charities, and the husband of Houston Ballet's artistic director are among the dead in a plane crash in Kerrville. 

The family of Marc Tellepsen confirms with ABC13 Eyewitness News that he was killed when the twin-engine Beechcraft BE58 he was traveling in crashed into the rocky terrain of the Texas Hill Country. 

Tellepsen, 45, was the owner of landscape architect firm Tellepsen Landscaping. 

He was also related to the family that founded the renowned construction firm Tellepsen Builders. 

His family released this statement: 

The family of Marc Tellepsen is extremely grateful for the outpouring of support from our friends, family and fellow Houstonians at this incredibly difficult time. We hope you understand our need for privacy as we grieve for the loss of our husband, father, beloved family member and friend. 

Mark Scioneaux, 58, is the husband of Houston Ballet artistic director Stanton Welch, and according to his LinkedIn page, worked in architecture and planning for Tellepsen Landscaping. 

"Words cannot express the sadness our Houston Ballet family feels over the sudden loss of Mark Scioneaux and the other 5 lives lost in the tragic plane accident yesterday. We will dearly miss Mark, the loving husband of our artistic director, Stanton Welch AM. He was a true friend to each of us in our tight-knit ballet family. He exuded a genuine warmth, with a kindness and big heart that defined him. Simply put, everyone loved Mark. And, we will work to keep his memory, his love and his kind spirit alive," said a statement from the Houston Ballett. 

Jeffrey C. Weiss was a senior vice president for investments at Raymond James and Associates in Houston. The Texas Department of Public Safety says the 65-year-old Weiss, who co-owned the Beechcraft BE58, was at the controls when the aircraft went down just before 9 a.m. Monday while approaching Kerrville Municipal Airport, about 70 miles northwest of San Antonio. 

DPS Sgt. Orlando Moreno identified the other victims as 55-year-old Stuart Roben Kensinger; 54-year-old Angela Webb Kensinger; and 55-year-old Scott Reagan Miller. 

St. John's School Headmaster Mark Desjardins sent a message about the deaths of Stuart and Angela. Stuart was a graduate of St. John's in 1981, and Angela was the school's long time varsity girls' lacrosse head coach. 

"This is shocking news for our entire community. At school tomorrow, we will have grief counselors available throughout the day for any student in need of support and guidance. Our thoughts and prayers are with all members of the Kensinger family, especially their son, Philip '16, and many individuals within our community who were close with Angie and Stuart. There are no words to describe the overwhelming sense of grief that we all feel over this devastating and sudden loss of two very close friends of this community," Desjardins wrote. 

Weiss owned the plane with his friend and fellow pilot Charles Morina. He said Weiss loved to fly and the pair volunteered their time transporting sick people from remote regions to Texas hospitals for Angel Flight. 

The Tellepsen family say they believe an architectural client chartered the plane, and were taking Tellepsen and Scioneaux on a short trip to survey some property when it crashed. 

Late Monday, the Tellepsen family issued this statement: 
The family of Marc Tellepsen is extremely grateful for the outpouring of support from our friends, family and fellow Houstonians at this incredibly difficult time. We hope you understand our need for privacy as we grieve for the loss of our husband, father, beloved family member and friend. 

Story and video ➤ https://abc13.com


Jeffrey C. Weiss has several planes, three of which are kept at West Houston Airport.


Bob Fuller
Fuller said he heard about the crash Monday morning from a friend who told him Weiss was at the controls.


HOUSTON, Texas - Six people died Monday in a plane crash on a private ranch in Kerrville, according to officials.

The plane departed from the West Houston Airport and crashed just before 9 a.m. while preparing to land at Kerrville Municipal Airport, which is about 6 miles away from the crash scene.

Officials said all six adults aboard the plane were killed. Here are the people who were killed:

Jeffery Carl Weiss, 65, of Houston (pilot)

Stuart Roben Kensinger, 55, of Houston

Angela Webb Kensinger, 54, of Houston

Mark Damien Scioneaux, 58, of Houston

Scott Reagan Miller, 55, of Houston

Marc Tellepsen, 45, of Houston

KPRC2 learned the plane is registered to Weiss, a successful Houston businessman and experienced pilot.

Weiss had logged more than 5,000 hours in the air, according to officials.

Officials do not yet know what caused the crash.

Weiss made his living as a personal wealth manager for the Raymond James firm, but his passion was flying and he used his flying skills to help others.

His friend Bob Fuller said he heard about the crash Monday morning from a friend who told him Weiss was at the controls.

"I got a call from a friend of mine who verified ... it was Jeff," Fuller said.

Fuller said Weiss volunteered his time for an array of charities: Providing flights for medical and humanitarian emergencies, for special needs kids, and supported both the Lone Star flight museum and the 1940 Air Terminal Museum at Hobby Airport.

Fuller said Weiss was the best pilot he'd ever seen.

"He's as meticulous a pilot as I've ever known," Fuller said. "Exceedingly safe, safety conscious."

Weiss also helped Fuller put on his Keels and Wheels charity event in Seabrook each year to aid abused children, giving both his time and money.

"I loved the man, I'll tell you that. He was generous to a fault. He wanted to support our charity any way he can and one of those was if I wanted to fly to Detroit to talk to General Motors, 'Call me first.'"

As Fuller mourns his friend, he is anxious to learn more about exactly what happened to the veteran pilot.

"ATC says he lost airspeed, and he was using instrument approach and he went down. I don't know if it was (the) engine. I have no clue," Fuller said.

Story and video ➤ https://www.click2houston.com


Kerr County Sheriff Rusty Hierholzer walks along Sheppard Rees Road, near the location where a Beechcraft 58 Baron crashed just outside Kerrville on private land, on April 22, 2019.



Kerr County Sheriff Rusty Hierholzer, center, makes a phone call, April 22, 2019, where his deputies guard the entrance to a private road near Kerrville, Texas, where a  Beechcraft 58 Baron crashed earlier in the day, killing all six people on board.

Robert Hurt
Local resident and former pilot Robert Hurt said he was puzzled why the plane was so far out on its final approach to the airport. He said weather conditions were good.


HOUSTON - Jeffrey C. Weiss has several planes, three of which are kept at West Houston Airport.

His fleet includes the plane that crashed Monday on a private ranch in Kerrville.

He and five others died in the crash, according to officials.

The plane departed from the West Houston Airport and crashed just before 9 a.m. while preparing to land at Kerrville Municipal Airport, which is about 6 miles away from the crash scene.

Officials said all six adults aboard the plane were killed.

The airport manager of West Houston Airport said it was a Beechcraft 58 Baron that crashed. The manager said it's a very popular aircraft that can seat six people.

The manager said Weiss has two other airplanes at the airport and has flown there for about 15 years.

Weiss is well-known for his giving nature and the manager said Weiss averaged about 40 hours of flight time a month, which equates to about 500 hours a year.

The manager said a majority of Weiss' flights were charitable acts -- such as picking up kids and people with medical issues and helping veterans travel. He also took part in a program to pick up stranded pilots.

A friend of Weiss said Weiss was behind the controls.

"If you were a friend and wanted to go from here to the Valley for a weekend hunting trip and called Jeff, 'Any chance you can take me down there?' He'd say, 'Sure, I love to fly, I'll take you,'" Bob Fuller said.

The manager said he heard Weiss on the radio Monday morning around 7:30 saying he was turning right and heading west.

He said Weiss flew a lot and last flew on Saturday. He said he's an excellent pilot and that they've flown together.


Story and video ➤ https://www.click2houston.com



Construction worker Richard Hall describes the last moments of before a Beechcraft 58 Baron crashed near Kerrville. He said plane flew over his work site. His co-workers said the engine cut out.



Federal investigators are on the scene of a deadly plane crash in the Texas Hill Country. The Beechcraft 58 Baron went down shortly before 9:00 a.m. about six miles northwest of Kerrville Municipal Airport.

Texas Department of Public Safety Sgt. Orlando Moreno said the plane crashed on a private ranch, killing all five passengers and the pilot.

The FAA was investigating the exact cause of the crash.

Construction worker Richard Hall said he was on a Bobcat vehicle when he saw the plane fly about 300 or 400 feet over his worksite. He said electricians working with him said they heard the engine cut out.

Local resident and former pilot Robert Hurt said he was puzzled why the plane was so far out on its final approach to the airport. He said weather conditions were good.

"No need for instruments, that I could tell," he said. "I am puzzled why they were this far out. You would not need to come this far out," a reference to the final approach.

The plane reportedly flew out of West Houston Airport. It was unclear if Kerrville was its scheduled final destination.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.tpr.org




KERRVILLE, Texas — KERRVILLE, Texas-- Six people have reportedly been killed in a plane crash in Kerrville Monday, the Texas Department of Public Safety has confirmed to KENS 5.

According to DPS Sergeant Orlando Moreno, the crash took place just before 9 a.m. near the Kerrville Municipal Airport.

Sgt. Moreno said all of the six occupants on board died in the aircraft that had departed earlier this morning from West Houston Airport outside Houston.

Sgt. Moreno said that the Beechcraft 58 Baron crashed into a private ranch while attempting to land at the Kerrville Municipal Airport. The ranch owner told KENS 5 planes fly over his property three to four times a day since they're so close to the airport.

It was not clear if there was a mayday call made prior to the crash. Sgt. Moreno said that they were not releasing the victim's identities and would be turning that decision over to The Federal Aviation Commission, the main investigating agency.

Richard Hall was doing some construction work when told KENS 5 a plane few just above his head by the time he turned around, the plane had crashed.

"It was just shocking and to see something like kind of slow motion go down, you think you're going to have more time to get over there and find the plane, maybe help some survivors," Hall said. "According to DPS, they had gone down so fast, there was no chance." 

According to KENS 5 sister station KHOU, the plane is registered to Jeffery Weiss of Houston. Sources told KHOU he died in the crash.

Along with the FAA, DPS and NTSB were assisting in the investigation.

Story and video ➤ https://www.kens5.com

18 comments:

Anonymous said...

It looks like the plane was on the RNAV approach to runway 12 at KERV, and went through some significant airspeed fluctuations after the procedure turn at OBUCO.

Anonymous said...

Speculation is worth a teaspoon of warm gopher drool - but it can be interesting and develop our thinking.
One blade of the prop on #2 engine is not bent or damaged (apparently).
No fire.
Not much ground scar is evident.
Flat spin after #2 stopped for whatever reason?

RIP to those who perished, condolences to their families and to the first responders.

Anonymous said...

6 adults in a 58 is cramped. Plus, C.G. Is dicey. I wonder if he was past the aft limit which would aggravate controllability with an engine out.

Anonymous said...

I agree with the above poster, looks like the right engine was shut down and prop feathered, likely got too slow and stalled/spun it in, as the wreckage is fairly contained in one area indicating minimal forward motion.

Anonymous said...

6 large adults (judging by the photos of the deceased) seems a bit much. I wonder if he took on less fuel to make the max gross weight and ended up running out of fuel short of the runway (lack of post-crash fire). If the right engine quit, the left engine may have still been running on fumes and that plane could have been a monster on one engine at that weight. I agree, most likely a stall/spin but appears the plane pancaked in and not straight down as lack of damage to the nose of the plane. The aerial video of the wreckage appears to show the entire top of the fuselage cabin area torn off (maybe it was cut off by first responders to get to the victims). NTSB will get it figured out, RIP to all lost.

T Ibach said...

spun in, flat impact, single engine ops perhaps, could be reason for the airspeed decay..RIP

Anonymous said...

Doesn't appear to be much damage to either prop

Anonymous said...


According to FlightAware he got very slow after turning inbound, I saw 79 kts on last radar return.

Citation Driver said...

If you look at his track and flight plan, he was inbound on the RNAV 12 approach into Kerville. He descended to 4,000' and crossed the IAF and did a teardrop entry into the approach. He maintained altitude as he made a right turn and got on the localizer. He starting having a tough time staying on the 124 degree heading as he descended (autopilot issue?). His next waypoint on the inbound route was LAVIC (which is 5 miles from the airport) and he should have been at or above 3,300' there. However, he descended to 2,300' .. 2 miles before he arrived at LAVIC (too low), but was in level flight and had enough airspeed to maintain flight there.
Don't know if he couldn't see the runway or maybe was having an mechanical issue, but he never got stabilized and was too low too soon on the inbound approach.
My "guess", and that's all anybody has without more information ... is that he was distracted on the approach trying to stay on the localizer and descended too low. He was trying to find the runway and let his airspeed bleed off too much and he stalled it.
OR .... It is the hill country and the airport elevation is 1,600' and he was flying the last mile at 2,100' before it went off radar. Don't know the area, but if he was too low, could he have hit or scraped something (tree top) and that caused the chain of events that led to the pancake stall mishap?


Unknown said...

Some good observations above. When twins crash in descent I often suspect a fuel issue. One thing I would add to those comments above is that an aft CG is more favorable in one engine inoperable situations as far as VMC is concerned. If within max gross a B58 should easily maintain a glidelsope descent or better. It does make one wonder if the tanks ran dry. :/

Anonymous said...

Directional control in multi engine airplanes with one engine inoperative is more difficult at aft CG vs. forward due to shorter arm.

Anonymous said...

You’re right.

Anonymous said...

Given the witness accounts and some quick internet calculations found on a Beech model 58, I'm going with fuel exhaustion on this one. I think given the weight of all 6 occupants(not including any baggage), the pilot only had about 60 gals in the tanks to make max gross weight at takeoff or enough for 1 1/2 hrs flying time with a 1/2 hr reserve. The Flightaware flight track shows 1:22 minutes not counting start-up,taxi,or run-up. I'm thinking when he did his procedural turn inbound, it un-ported the fuel pickup in the tank causing it to suck air and leading to the right engine to quit. The plane may have been hard to control at that weight or maybe the pilot just got distracted, got too slow and stalled & spun in. RIP to the pilot and my condolences to the families of the deceased.

Anonymous said...

Flat impact, guess one of the engines failed and the CG was near the limit, RIP.

Anonymous said...

Agree completely with the comments herein. I too believe in engine failure, probably due to fuel exhaustion and then an issue even with shut-down/feathering & 5% bank to good engine, the lower altitude and aft CG became too much to handle. A slight mishandling and over-limit payload could have induced a stall, leading to flat spin, which was unrecoverable. Explains the lack of extended debris field, final location, lack of nose or lateral gear impact, and absence of post-impact fire. RIP to Jeff and the rest of the souls aboard. Fine pilot and an even better man. Rest easy my friend.

Anonymous said...

It has been more that a week since the accident and I still feel like my heart has been ripped out with a back hoe. For those of us that knew Jeff suffice it to say that this ending is not what he would have wanted for his friends or for himself. God bless you Jeff, you were a good man.

Anonymous said...


The road to hell is paved with good intentions.

Anonymous said...

Similar accident in a Navajo a year or so ago...fuel exhaustion, two professional couples lost with resulting orphans.