Wednesday, March 6, 2019

Velocity RG, operated by Mission Hardware Ltd as an instructional flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N101WV: Accident occurred March 05, 2019 at Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport (KTBR), Georgia

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N101WV


Location: Stateboro, GA
Accident Number: ERA19LA119
Date & Time: 03/05/2019, 1500 EST
Registration: N101WV
Aircraft: OSTERTAG WALTER G Velocity RG
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On March 5, 2019, about 1500 eastern standard time, an experimental amateur-built Velocity RG, N101WV, was destroyed by a postcrash fire after it impacted an approach lighting system and terrain while landing at the Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport (TBR), Statesboro, Georgia. The commercial pilot was not injured, and the flight instructor sustained minor injuries. The airplane was operated by Mission Hardware Ltd as an instructional flight conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed, no flight plan was filed for the flight, which originated from Savannah-Hilton Head International Airport (SAV), Savannah, Georgia, about 1400.

According to the pilot, he was receiving instruction and transition training for the Velocity RG from a flight instructor. After performing a series of maneuvers while en route from SAV, they entered a left downwind for runway 32 at TBR. They intended to practice takeoff and landings before returning to SAV. The pilot stated they were on a stabilized final approach at about 100 knots, into a headwind that was gusting to 18 knots. He noted that the typical approach speed in the velocity is 80 knots. On short final approach, the airplane sank abruptly and lost about 20 knots of airspeed, about 15-20 ft above ground level (agl). The pilot initiated a go-around procedure, added additional power and full aft stick. The airplane appeared to climb when the right main landing gear struck an approach light. The airplane then "pancaked" onto the runway and rotated clockwise before coming to a stop. The pilot and the flight instructor then exited the airplane before a postcrash fire ensued.

The flight instructor provided a similar description of the approach, and stated that just before the airplane's nose pitched down, while flying at about 15 to 20 feet above ground level, the pilot was flying the airplane at an airspeed around 90 knots. The flight instructor further stated that he typically flew approached in the accident airplane make and model at an airspeed that was 10 to 15 knots faster than the airplane's stall speed of 70 knots, and would typically add an additional 10 knots of airspeed for approaches in gusty or crosswind conditions.

Both pilots stated they believed they encountered wind shear on short final approach.

A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector responded to the accident site and examined the wreckage. The majority of the wreckage was consumed by fire. The winglets and propeller, at the rear of the airplane, were the only portions of the airplane that did not exhibit thermal damage. The airplane came to rest to the right of the runway in the grass. There were multiple gouges in the ground starting at the landing lights leading towards the runway.

The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land, instrument airplane, and rotorcraft-helicopter. He held a flight instructor certificate with a rating for airplane single-engine, and instrument airplane. He held a mechanic certificate with airframe and powerplant ratings. His most recent FAA second-class medical certificate was issued December 5, 2018. He reported 4,300 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The flight instructor held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single- and multiengine land, and airplane instrument. He held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine and instrument airplane. He held a repairman experimental aircraft builder certificate for the accident airplane make and model. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued September 11, 2017. He reported 1,790 total hours of flight experience on that date.

The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing, canard-equipped airplane was built in 1995. It was powered by a Lycoming IO-360, 180-horsepower engine. A review of the airplane's maintenance records revealed that the most recent condition inspection was completed on January 17, 2019.

At 1455, the weather conditions reported at TBR included, wind from 320° at 13 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, clear skies, temperature 13° C, dew point -1° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.05 inches of mercury. At 1435, about 25 minutes before the accident, the winds were 320° at 13 knots, gusting to 16 knots. At 1515, about 15 minutes after the accident, the winds were 320° at 9 knots, gusting to 20 knots.

The FAA Airplane Flying Handbook (FAA-H-8083-3B), states for landing in turbulent conditions, us a power-on approach at an airspeed slightly above the normal approach speed. This provides for more positive control of the airplane when strong horizontal wind gusts, or up and down drafts, are experienced. One procedure is to use the normal approach speed plus one-half of the wind gust factors.

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 64, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 09/11/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 06/23/2017
Flight Time:  2232 hours (Total, all aircraft), 7 hours (Total, this make and model), 2014 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 51 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 23 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Pilot Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 63, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): Helicopter
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 12/05/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 04/01/2018
Flight Time: 4300 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2.5 hours (Total, this make and model)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: OSTERTAG WALTER G
Registration: N101WV
Model/Series: Velocity RG
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1995
Amateur Built: Yes
Airworthiness Certificate: Experimental
Serial Number: DMO134
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 01/17/2019, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2300 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1357.6 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO-360-X
Registered Owner: Mission Hardware Ltd Co
Rated Power: 200 hp
Operator: Mission Hardware Ltd Co
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: TBR, 187 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1455 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 324°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 13 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 320°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: /
Altimeter Setting: 30.05 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 13°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Savannah, GA (SAV)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Stateboro, GA (TBR)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1400 EST
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Statesboro-Bulloch County (TBR)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 186 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 32
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 6000 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop; Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Minor, 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  32.475278, -81.730556 (est)





STATESBORO, Georgia (WSAV) - Two people were on board when a plane crashed at the Statesboro Bulloch County Airport Tuesday afternoon.

According to the Bulloch County Sheriff’s Office, the plane took off from Savannah and had to make an emergency landing.

Photos from a witness show the plane engulfed in flames.

Statesboro Deputy Fire Chief Bobby Duggar says at least a dozen firefighters responded to the airport around 3:05 p.m.

The pilot and passenger were checked out by Bulloch County EMS on the scene and were transported to the hospital with unknown injuries.

The National Transportation Safety Board will be investigating. They are expected in Statesboro on Wednesday.

The airport is located on Newton Road, about three miles from downtown.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.wsav.com


Authorities say two people avoided serious injuries in a plane crash Tuesday afternoon in Statesboro.

A plane crash was reported around 3 p.m. on the runway at Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport.

Story, video and photo gallery ➤ https://www.wjcl.com



A single-engine airplane crashed Tuesday at the Statesboro-Bulloch County Airport. Two occupants got out of the plane before it was consumed by fire, but they escaped serious injury.

Bulloch County sheriff’s Capt. Todd Hutchens said the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration will be on site today to investigate. As of Tuesday evening, neither the cause of the crash nor the victims’ identities were available.

Around 3 p.m. Tuesday, Statesboro firefighters, Georgia State Patrol troopers, Bulloch County sheriff’s deputies and Bulloch County EMS responded to the scene. Statesboro fire Deputy Chief Bobby Duggar said the plane was engulfed in flames upon firefighters’ arrival and was on a grassy area next to the runway.

Airport lineman Mitchell Melton said that as of Tuesday evening, airport authorities did not have further information about the crash.

The Statesboro Herald will follow up on the plane crash when NTSB and FAA reports are made available.

Original article ➤ https://www.statesboroherald.com

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