Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Flight Design CTSW, owned by Mooney of Monticello Inc and operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91, N62JN: Fatal accident occurred July 01, 2017 near Monticello Regional Airport (KMXO), Jones County, Iowa

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Ankeny, Iowa

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 


Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N62JN


Location: Monticello, IA
Accident Number: CEN17FA249
Date & Time: 07/01/2017, 1603 CDT
Registration: N62JN
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CTSW
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

Analysis 

The commercial pilot was conducting a personal flight in the two-seat, light sport airplane with his dog in the right passenger seat. A witness, who was piloting another airplane in the traffic pattern, reported that, while he was on the downwind leg, he saw the accident airplane on final approach to the runway. The witness subsequently lost visual contact with the accident airplane as he turned his airplane onto the base leg. The witness did not see the accident airplane on the runway or taxiway after he turned onto final approach. The witness conducted a go-around and then saw the accident airplane in a cornfield adjacent to the runway. After the accident, the witness saw the pilot's dog running out of the cornfield where the airplane had crashed.

Based on available ground track and engine data, the airplane crossed the runway 27 threshold at a calculated airspeed of 48 knots. About 3 seconds later, the airplane turned right away from the runway heading, and the engine speed increased to takeoff power. The airplane subsequently descended right wing down into the cornfield about 250 ft north of the runway centerline. The final calculated airspeed was about 44 knots. Although the airplane's wings-level aerodynamic stall speed with the wing flaps fully extended was 39 knots, the stall speed would have increased exponentially with the bank angle as the airplane turned right.

According to the pilot's son, the pilot routinely flew with his dog, who weighed between 70 and 75 lbs. He added that the pilot had installed a homemade, removable, plywood device to prevent the right-seat passenger (or his dog) from inadvertently contacting the rudder pedals during flight. Although the device was not approved to be installed in the airplane, there was no evidence that it interfered with the full movement of either control stick or the pilot-side rudder pedals. Postaccident examination of the airplane and engine did not reveal any evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. Given the ground track and engine data, it is likely that the dog contacted the aileron and/or stabilator controls during landing, which resulted in the pilot's loss of airplane control and a subsequent aerodynamic stall at a low altitude when the airplane exceeded its critical angle of attack. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's decision to fly with his large dog in the two-seat, light sport airplane, and the dog's likely contact with the flight controls during landing, which resulted in the pilot's loss of airplane control and a subsequent aerodynamic stall when the airplane exceeded its critical angle of attack. 

Findings

Aircraft
Flight control system - Unintentional use/operation (Cause)
Angle of attack - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues

Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues

Animal(s)/bird(s) - Effect on operation (Cause)
Animal(s)/bird(s) - Ability to respond/compensate (Cause)

Factual Information

History of Flight

Landing
Loss of control in flight (Defining event)
Attempted remediation/recovery
Aerodynamic stall/spin
Collision with terr/obj (non-CFIT)

On July 1, 2017, at 1603 central daylight time, a Flight Design CTSW light sport airplane, N62JN, collided with terrain while landing at Monticello Regional Airport (MXO), Monticello, Iowa. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, his dog sustained minor injuries, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned by Mooney of Monticello, Inc., and was being operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed near the accident site, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which departed MXO about 1506.

A witness, who was practicing takeoffs and landings on runway 27 at MXO, reported that he saw the accident airplane approaching the airport from the east. The witness transmitted on the common traffic advisory frequency that he was on short final approach to runway 27. The accident pilot asked the witness if he was landing or departing. The witness replied that he was going to conduct a touch-and-go landing on runway 27. The witness stated that, after completing his touch-and-go landing, he announced that he was turning onto the downwind leg for runway 27. The accident pilot replied that he was aborting his landing approach. The witness stated that he and the accident pilot subsequently confirmed seeing each other east of the airport at pattern altitude. The witness continued in the traffic pattern and conducted another touch-and-go landing on runway 27. The witness stated that, while on the next downwind leg, he observed the accident airplane on a final approach to runway 27. The witness transmitted that he would extend his downwind to increase spacing between the two airplanes. The accident pilot replied that he was on final approach for a full-stop landing on runway 27. The witness subsequently lost visual contact with the accident airplane as he turned his airplane onto the base leg. The witness did not see the accident airplane on the runway or taxiway after he turned onto final approach. The witness conducted a go-around and then saw the accident airplane in a cornfield adjacent to the runway.

Data from the airplane's engine monitor, which included the final 41 minutes 32 seconds of flight, indicated that, at 1603:34, the airplane crossed the runway 27 threshold, and the ground speed and engine speed had decreased from 46.8 knots and 2,188 rpm to 35.6 knots and 2,000 rpm, respectively. At 1603:37, about 163 ft past the runway 27 threshold, the airplane turned right away from the runway. At that time, the ground speed had decreased to 34.1 knots, but the engine speed had increased to 4,343 rpm. The final data point was recorded at 1603:41, when the airplane was about 160 ft north of the runway centerline and still turning right. The final data point indicated a ground speed of 41.3 knots, an engine speed of 4,833 rpm (takeoff power), a fuel flow of 3.125 gallons per hour, and that there were 12.9 gallons of fuel remaining.

Surface wind data and data from the airplane's electronic engine monitor were used to calculate the airplane's airspeed during the approach. The surface wind at the time of the accident was from 280° at 13 knots, which would have resulted in airspeeds about 12.8 knots higher than the recorded ground speeds while the airplane was on final approach to runway 27. At 1603:34, the airplane crossed the runway threshold at a calculated airspeed of 48.4 knots. At 1603:37, the airplane turned right away from the runway heading at a calculated airspeed of 46.9 knots. At 1603:41, the airplane's heading was 357°, and it had a calculated airspeed of 44.1 knots. A review of the recorded data did not reveal any anomalies with engine operation during the flight.

After the accident, the witness saw the pilot's dog, who had been onboard the airplane, running out of the cornfield where the airplane had crashed. First responders were able to catch the dog, who was treated for minor injuries by a local veterinarian. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 90, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/14/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 7450 hours (Total, all aircraft), 10.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the 90-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. His last aviation medical examination was on August 14, 2014, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses. On the application for his medical certificate, the pilot reported having accumulated 7,450 hours of total flight experience, of which 30 hours were flown within the previous 6 months. The medical certificate expired on August 31, 2016; however, federal regulations only required the pilot to possess a valid driver's license to operate the light sport airplane. According to local law enforcement, the pilot had a valid Iowa driver's license. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings.

A comprehensive pilot logbook was not located during the investigation. An airplane use log recovered from the wreckage was used to calculate the pilot's recent flight experience. According to the airplane use log, he had flown 40.9, 16.8, 10.6, and 5.4 hours during the 1 year, 6 months, 90 days, and 30 days before the accident, respectively. The accident flight was about 57 minutes and was the only flight conducted within 24 hours of the accident. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH
Registration: N62JN
Model/Series: CTSW NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: 06-01-09
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/18/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1323 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 28 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 664.25 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 912 ULS
Registered Owner: Mooney of Monticello, Inc.
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: Mooney of Monticello, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The two-seat light sport airplane, serial number 06-01-09, manufactured in 2006, was a high-wing monoplane constructed of primarily carbon-fiber reinforced plastic. The airplane was powered by a 100-horsepower, 4-cylinder, Rotax 912 ULS reciprocating engine, serial number 5.645.807. The engine provided thrust through a fixed-pitch, three-blade, Neuform model CR3-65-47-101.6 propeller. The airplane was equipped with fixed-tricycle landing gear, wing flaps, and had a maximum gross weight of 1,323 pounds. The FAA issued the light sport airplane a special airworthiness certificate and associated operating limitations on March 29, 2006.

The airplane's hour meter indicated 664.25 hours at the accident site. At the time of the accident, the airframe, engine, and propeller had accumulated 664.25 total service hours. The engine had accumulated 225.25 hours since being overhauled on October 25, 2012. The last condition inspection of the airplane was completed on October 18, 2016, at 636.3 total airframe hours. Postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues.

According to the airplane's Pilot's Operating Handbook, the wings-level aerodynamic stall speed with flaps retracted (0°) and flaps fully extended (40°) is 42 and 39 knots, respectively. The minimum and maximum continuous engine speed for takeoff is 4,500 and 5,500 rpm, respectively.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MXO, 832 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1555 CDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5500 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 13 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 280°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Monticello, IA (MXO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Monticello, IA (MXO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1506 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

A postaccident review of available meteorological data established that day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. At 1555, about 8 minutes before the accident, the MXO automated surface observing system reported wind from 280° at 13 knots, 10 miles surface visibility, few clouds at 5,500 ft above ground level, temperature 24°C, dew point 13°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury. 

Airport Information

Airport: Monticello Regional Airport (MXO)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 832 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2316 ft / 90 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

MXO, a public airport located about 2 miles southeast of Monticello, Iowa, was owned and operated by the City of Monticello. The airport field elevation was 832 ft mean sea level. The airport had two runways, a concrete runway 15/33 (4,400 ft by 75 ft) and a turf runway 9/27 (2,316 ft by 90 ft). The airport was not equipped with an air traffic control tower.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 42.219722, -91.158333 

The accident site was in a cornfield located adjacent to runway 27. All the airplane's major structural components and flight controls were accounted for at the accident site. The wreckage debris path and airplane damage were consistent with the airplane impacting the ground in a right-wing-down, nose-down pitch attitude while on a north-northeast heading. The initial point-of-impact (POI) was about 250 ft north of the runway centerline where fragments of the right wing tip were found. A propeller slash mark in the terrain and several fragments of a propeller blade were found about 24 ft northeast of the initial POI. The main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, left wing, empennage, and engine, was located 54 ft northeast of the initial POI. The fuselage was found inverted, and the cockpit's primary structure was heavily fragmented. The entire right wing had separated from the fuselage. The left wing remained partially attached to the fuselage.

First responders reported that fuel was leaking from the left wing root. Both cockpit flight control sticks were found installed. Flight control continuity to the ailerons could not be established due to impact damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress. Flight control cable continuity for the stabilizer and rudder was established. A homemade plywood device was installed on the right-side passenger floorboard to prevent a passenger from inadvertently contacting the rudder pedals during flight. The removable device used a hinged, vertical panel to block access to the rudder pedals. Although the device was not approved to be installed in the airplane, there was no evidence that it interfered with the full movement of either control stick or the pilot-side rudder pedals. The main landing gear remained attached to the lower fuselage. The nose landing gear remained attached to the forward fuselage. The electronic flap control selector was found in the flaps fully extended (40°) position. The ignition switch was found selected to BOTH. The fuel valve control assembly was damaged during impact. The throttle control was found full forward. The engine choke control was found in an intermediate position. The brake control was found selected to OFF. The ballistic-recovery parachute handle was not pulled, and the safety pin was found installed. The activation cable to the rocket motor was cut before the wreckage was moved to prevent an inadvertent discharge.

The engine remained attached to the firewall, and the propeller hub remained attached to the crankshaft flange and spacer. The three-blade propeller exhibited blade damage consistent with rotation at impact. Two of the three propeller blades separated about 6 inches from the hub. The remaining propeller blade remained attached to the hub, but the outboard quarter of the blade had separated during impact. Several propeller fragments were located along the wreckage debris path. The engine did not exhibit any crankcase or cylinder fractures. No oil leaks were observed on the exterior engine components. The oil reservoir contained engine oil and no metallic debris. A partial disassembly of the mechanical oil pump did not reveal any anomalies. The sparkplugs exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. Both carburetors remained attached to their respective induction tubes. The right carburetor contained residual fuel. The left carburetor contained no fuel. No contamination was observed in the carburetor bowls or their fuel screens. Internal engine and valve train continuity were confirmed as the crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders when the crankshaft was turned. The dual electronic ignition system appeared undamaged. Postaccident examination of the engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Iowa's Office of State Medical Examiner, Ankeny, Iowa, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident. Toxicological test results from the autopsy were negative for alcohol and drugs in blood, and no alcohol was detected in vitreous.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on specimens obtained during the pilot's autopsy. The toxicology results were negative for carbon monoxide and all tested drugs and medications. The testing detected 19 mg/dL of ethanol in urine; however, no ethanol was detected in blood. The ethanol detected in urine was consistent with postmortem alcohol production and not from ingestion.

Additional Information

According to the pilot's son, his father routinely flew with his dog in the right seat. The dog reportedly weighed between about 70 and 75 lbs. The pilot's son also confirmed that his father had fabricated the plywood device to prevent the right-seat passenger (or his dog) from inadvertently contacting the rudder pedals during flight.

NTSB Identification: CEN17FA249
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, July 01, 2017 in Monticello, IA
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CTSW, registration: N62JN
Injuries: 1 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 1, 2017, about 1603 central daylight time, a Flight Design CTSW single-engine light sport airplane, N62JN, was substantially damaged when it impacted terrain while landing at Monticello Regional Airport (MXO), Monticello, Iowa. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and his dog sustained minor injuries. The airplane was registered to Mooney of Monticello Inc. and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 91 without a flight plan. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed for the local flight that departed MXO about 1515.

A witness, who was a pilot practicing takeoffs and landings on runway 27 at MXO, reported that the accident airplane had approached the airport from the east before entering a left downwind for runway 27. He observed the accident airplane on its final approach to runway 27; however, the witness lost visual contact with the airplane when he entered his base turn for runway 27. The witness reported that, when his airplane was established on final for runway 27, he did not see the accident airplane on the runway or taxiway so he performed a go-around. During the go-around he spotted the accident airplane in the cornfield adjacent to the runway.

At 1655, the MXO automated surface observing system reported: wind 280° at 13 knots, few clouds at 5,500 feet above ground level (agl), 10 miles surface visibility; temperature 24°C; dew point 13°C; and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury.



Jerry J. Naylor, 90, of Scotch Grove, Iowa, a loving husband, father, grandfather, brother and friend, made his final landing in the arms of Jesus on Saturday, July 1, 2017.  Visitation will be on Friday, July 7, 2017 from 3:00 pm to 8:00 pm at the Cedar Memorial Chapel of Memories Stateroom, 4200 First Avenue NE, Cedar Rapids, IA.  

On Saturday, July 8, 2017, a Memorial Service will be held at 11:30 am at Community of Christ Church, 1500 Blairs Ferry Road, Hiawatha, IA.  Friends may visit at 10:30 am (one hour prior to the Memorial Service).

A Celebration of Jerry’s Life will be held in Monticello, Iowa at a later date.  

Jerry is survived by his loving wife of 65 years, Betty of Scotch Grove, IA; four children, a daughter, Coleen Rapier of Cedar Rapids, IA, and her children, Justin (Valery) Rapier of Fairfax, IA and Renée (Edmundo Ruiz) Rapier of Walnut Creek, CA; a daughter, Gayle (Kevin) Stingley of Monticello, IA, and their children, Jessica Stingley of Coralville; Jenna (Tyler) Pedersen of Arvada, CO; and Shelby Stingley of Coralville, IA; a son, David (Kelli) Naylor of Monticello, IA; and their children, Dustin (Annie) Farber of Dubuque, IA; Britni Farber of Dubuque, IA; Nick (Stephanie) Farber of Dubuque, IA; Brittany, Dawson, and Jaxson Naylor all of Monticello, IA; and a daughter, Diane Naylor of Fairfield, IA; plus 13 great-grandchildren; a brother, Jack Naylor of Burlington, IA, and his beloved flying companion, Jasmine (a Goldendoodle).

He was preceded in death by his parents, Ray and Pearl Naylor and siblings, Ray “Dick” Naylor, Carol Meier, Lois Butters, Connie Stephens, and Laurel Oppelt.  

Jerry J. Naylor was born on November 14, 1926 in Center Junction, Iowa, son of Ray and Pearl (Anway) Naylor.  He graduated from Monticello High School and then attended Iowa State University.  He proudly served in the United States Air Force.  Jerry married the love of his life Betty McDonald on May 3, 1952 in Rock Island, IL.  He was a long time member of the Camp Courageous Board, AOPA, Shriners, and served as President of the Monticello Rotary Club, Iowa Seed Association, and Iowa Crop Improvement Association.  Jerry, along with his son, David, owned and operated Naylor Seed Company in Scotch Grove, IA.

Jerry loved traveling with his wife, Betty and spending time with his family.  He earned his pilot’s license in 1947 and for over 70 years, enjoyed flying his numerous airplanes.  Every year, Jerry and Betty looked forward to flying their Piper Aztec to the Hacienda de los Santos Club Pilotos Reunion in Alamos, Mexico. 

As a founding member of the El Kahir Shrine Flying Fez unit, Jerry flew children to Shriners Hospitals for Children throughout the U.S. for over 30 years.  He was an avid contender in the Flying Fez spot landing and cross country contests. Jerry also enjoyed racing stock cars, skydiving, fishing in Canada, and snow skiing in Colorado.  Jerry was competitive, determined, innovative, and honorable with an amazing spirit about him.  Jerry’s character always brought joy and laughter which is why so many people loved him.  His smile was infectious.  Jerry’s endless compassion drove him to help others unconditionally.  Most importantly, nothing compared to the love Jerry had for his family, his faith in God, and living life to its fullest.  He will be lovingly remembered and greatly missed.

Your memories of Jerry are precious to the family.  Please feel free to bring a story/memory to share, write or record as there will be a designated area at both locations with supplies provided.  If you are unable to attend, please share your story/memory at JerryNaylorMemories@gmail.com 


In Jerry’s memory, the family would like to encourage donations, in lieu of flowers, to a charity of your choice or to the following organizations; Camp Courageous of Iowa, El Kahir Shriners or the Community of Christ Church. 



CEDAR RAPIDS (KWWL) -  An area family honored and remembered one of their loved ones in a daring way this weekend.

David and Brittany Naylor participated in the Heartland Youth for Christ, Over the Edge fundraiser in Cedar Rapids today to remember their family member, Jerry Naylor who died in a plane crash in July.

90-year-old Jerry Naylor from Scotch Grove was the only passenger inside of a plane that crashed on July 1. Family members say his dog survived, but Jerry did not.

David, Jerry's son and Brittany, Jerry's granddaughter, repelled down the side of the seven story Iowa Building, in memory of the father, grandfather and husband.

"If dad was here he would have done it with us, that's the type of guy he was," said David Naylor. "He would always except the challenge and he loved a challenge and just loved life."

David says his father had been flying planes for 70 years and they do not know what caused the accident.

"He would go flying at least two or three times a week and take his favorite companion, his golden doodle Jasmine," said David. "They were out for a flight and they were out for about an hour and a half and at one of his approaches at the Monticello Airport something went wrong and that was it... we don't know what happened."

It's been nearly two months since the accident and the Naylor family says they were honored to remember him today and the family says it makes it easier knowing Jerry died doing something he loved.

"If he had a choice on how to leave this life that would have been it, he was doing what he loved to do," said David. "My father Jerry Naylor has flown since 1947 and he was just an amazing man, he taught us how to go through life helping people and he had an infectious smile and a gift of meeting people."


Dozens gathered to also take part in the Over the Edge fundraiser today. David says his father was very passionate about the organization, one of the many reason he and his daughter repelled today in his honor.

Jerry Naylor



MONTICELLO (KWWL) - 90-year-old Jerry Naylor of Scotch Grove, is being remembered as an avid pilot, an active man, who was always on the go.

He died Saturday in a plane crash near the Monticello Regional Airport.

Officials say it happened around 4 p.m. The plane crashed in a cornfield about 50 yards from the runway. The National Transportation Safety Board says the aircraft was a Flight Design CTSW LSA.

Naylor, was the only person on board, but he was not alone. His daughter Diane tells KWWL, his beloved dog, Jasmine, was with him. Somehow, she survived, and was later found in the field.

All of this is difficult for the family, including Naylor's wife of 65-years, Elizabeth.

People at the airport, also very emotional. The manager, Paul Elmegreen says Naylor was very involved with the airport. It is a close-knit aviation community.

According to his daughter, Naylor had been flying planes since the 1940s. "He was the best pilot, would check his list," Diane said. "Besides his wife, flying was his love."

As part of a volunteer group, he would also fly patients to the Shriner's Children's Hospital.

Naylor was also vice president of the Naylor Seed Company, a long running, family owned business in Eastern Iowa.

Investigators are looking into the cause of the plane crash. An autopsy will be done to determine the cause of death.

Family confirms 90-year-old Jerry Naylor of Scotch Grove died in yesterday's plane crash near Monticello airport.

Family says he was flying with his beloved dog, Jasmine. She was later found in the field, and is okay. 

Jones County authorities confirm a pilot died Saturday during a plane crash in Monticello.

Authorities were called to 144th Avenue in Monticello at 4:04 p.m. for a plane crash near the Monticello Regional Airport.

First responders found plane wreckage about 50 yards from the runway in a nearby field.

The pilot was the only person in the plane. 

The Monticello Police Department and the FAA will be working together to learn more details about the crash.

According to a person who lives near the Monticello Regional Airport, authorities are investigating a plane crash that happened around 4 p.m.


Jerry Naylor


MONTICELLO, Iowa (KCRG-TV9) --  Family members confirmed Sunday, 90-year-old Jerry Naylor of Scotch Grove died Saturday afternoon when his small aircraft crashed in a cornfield near the Monticello Regional Airport.

Son, David Naylor, said his father had been flying since 1945 and still had an active commercial pilot's license at the time of his death.

"He was very active," said David. "He flew about two to three times a week."

David said his father was making a regular local flight Saturday when the plane went down around 4:00 in the afternoon. Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration's Des Moines office and the National Transportation Safety Board from Chicago will be conducting an investigation to determine what led to the crash.

Jerry had been flying with his dog who survived the crash. Jerry's son said the Goldendoodle, Jasmine, was his father's "favorite travel companion."

David called Jerry an "amazing pilot" that could "fly by the seat of his pants." His passion for flight was perhaps only rivaled by his deep faith in God, said David.

"His last touchdown was in the face of Jesus," said David.

KCRG-TV9 had a chance to meet Jerry Naylor in 2013. At the time, the then 86-year-old was helping a teen fly to Cincinnati for burn treatment at the Shriners Hospitals for Children. Jerry had been making those trips for 30 years.

"I have no intention of quitting, til I don't know when," said Jerry in 2013. "But, I'll keep flying."


http://www.kwqc.com



Jerry Naylor

MONTICELLO, Iowa (KCRG-TV9) -- Monticello Police tell TV9 the pilot of a small aircraft is dead after crashing in a corn field near the Monticello Regional Airport.



A resident on 144th Ave. called authorities around 4:00 to report the crash.



Police found the aircraft in the field, about 50 yards from the grass runway.



The pilot was the only occupant. Law enforcement is withholding the identity until family can be notified. 



Police tell TV9 they'll likely release the name tomorrow.



Officials from the Federal Aviation Administration's Des Moines office and the National Transportation Safety Board from Chicago will be conducting an investigation to determine what led to the crash.



Neighbors say a small airplane has crashed in a cornfield near the Monticello Regional Airport.



They believe it happened around 4:00 Saturday afternoon.



Dixie Shady said the plane ended up in the field on the edge of her property. She believed it to be a smaller aircraft, saying only a white tip of the vehicle is visible above the corn stalks.



Various emergency crews are on hand, including two ambulances and some fire trucks.






MONTICELLO, Iowa — Family members are remembering the life of a longtime pilot who died Saturday afternoon when his small aircraft crashed in a cornfield near the Monticello Regional Airport, Cedar Rapids television station KCRG reported.

Jerry Naylor, 90, of Scotch Grove, died when his plane crashed around 4 p.m. near 144th Avenue, about 50 yards from the grass runway. Family members said Naylor’s dog, a Goldendoodle named Jasmine, was his “favorite travel companion” and was with Naylor when the plane crashed. The dog survived.

Naylor’s son, David, said his father had been flying since 1945 and had an active commercial pilot's license at the time of his death.

"He was very active," David Naylor said. "He flew about two to three times a week."

David Naylor said his father was making a regular flight Saturday when the plane crashed.

The Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board are investigating what caused the crash.

David Naylor said his father was an "amazing pilot" who could "fly by the seat of his pants." His passion for flight was perhaps only rivaled by his deep faith in God, David Naylor said.

"His last touchdown was in the face of Jesus," he said.

Jerry Naylor spoked with KCRG in 2013 as he was helping a teenager fly to Cincinnati, Ohio, for burn treatment at the Shriners Hospitals for Children, something he had been doing for 30 years.

"I have no intention of quitting ‘til I don't know when," Jerry Naylor told KCRG. "But, I'll keep flying."
Jerry J. Naylor

Jerry proudly served in the United States Air Force.  He was a long time member of the Camp Courageous Board, AOPA, Shriners, and served as President of the Monticello Rotary Club, Iowa Seed Association, and Iowa Crop Improvement Association. Jerry, along with his son, David, owned and operated Naylor Seed Company in Scotch Grove, Iowa. He earned his pilot’s license in 1947 and for over 70 years, enjoyed flying his numerous airplanes.  Jerry married the love of his life Betty McDonald on May 3rd, 1952. Every year, Jerry and Betty looked forward to flying their Piper Aztec to the Hacienda de los Santos Club Pilotos Reunion in Alamos, Mexico. 

As a founding member of the El Kahir Shrine Flying Fez unit, Jerry flew children to Shriners Hospitals for Children throughout the U.S. for over 30 years.  He was an avid contender in the Flying Fez spot landing and cross country contests.  Jerry was competitive, determined, innovative, and honorable with an amazing spirit about him.  Jerry’s character always brought joy and laughter which is why so many people loved him.  His smile was infectious.  Jerry’s endless compassion drove him to help others unconditionally.  Most importantly, nothing compared to the love Jerry had for his family, his faith in God, and living life to its fullest.  He is lovingly remembered every day and greatly missed.

Jerry J. Naylor


The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Des Moines, Ankeny, Iowa

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms 
 
http://registry.faa.gov/N62JN


Jerry J. Naylor

Location: Monticello, IA
Accident Number: CEN17FA249
Date & Time: 07/01/2017, 1603 CDT
Registration: N62JN
Aircraft: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH CTSW
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Loss of control in flight
Injuries: 1 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On July 1, 2017, at 1603 central daylight time, a Flight Design CTSW light sport airplane, N62JN, collided with terrain while landing at Monticello Regional Airport (MXO), Monticello, Iowa. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, his dog sustained minor injuries, and the airplane was substantially damaged. The airplane was owned by Mooney of Monticello, Inc., and was being operated by the pilot under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Day visual meteorological conditions prevailed near the accident site, and no flight plan was filed for the local personal flight, which departed MXO about 1506.

A witness, who was practicing takeoffs and landings on runway 27 at MXO, reported that he saw the accident airplane approaching the airport from the east. The witness transmitted on the common traffic advisory frequency that he was on short final approach to runway 27. The accident pilot asked the witness if he was landing or departing. The witness replied that he was going to conduct a touch-and-go landing on runway 27. The witness stated that, after completing his touch-and-go landing, he announced that he was turning onto the downwind leg for runway 27. The accident pilot replied that he was aborting his landing approach. The witness stated that he and the accident pilot subsequently confirmed seeing each other east of the airport at pattern altitude. The witness continued in the traffic pattern and conducted another touch-and-go landing on runway 27. The witness stated that, while on the next downwind leg, he observed the accident airplane on a final approach to runway 27. The witness transmitted that he would extend his downwind to increase spacing between the two airplanes. The accident pilot replied that he was on final approach for a full-stop landing on runway 27. The witness subsequently lost visual contact with the accident airplane as he turned his airplane onto the base leg. The witness did not see the accident airplane on the runway or taxiway after he turned onto final approach. The witness conducted a go-around and then saw the accident airplane in a cornfield adjacent to the runway.

Data from the airplane's engine monitor, which included the final 41 minutes 32 seconds of flight, indicated that, at 1603:34, the airplane crossed the runway 27 threshold, and the ground speed and engine speed had decreased from 46.8 knots and 2,188 rpm to 35.6 knots and 2,000 rpm, respectively. At 1603:37, about 163 ft past the runway 27 threshold, the airplane turned right away from the runway. At that time, the ground speed had decreased to 34.1 knots, but the engine speed had increased to 4,343 rpm. The final data point was recorded at 1603:41, when the airplane was about 160 ft north of the runway centerline and still turning right. The final data point indicated a ground speed of 41.3 knots, an engine speed of 4,833 rpm (takeoff power), a fuel flow of 3.125 gallons per hour, and that there were 12.9 gallons of fuel remaining.

Surface wind data and data from the airplane's electronic engine monitor were used to calculate the airplane's airspeed during the approach. The surface wind at the time of the accident was from 280° at 13 knots, which would have resulted in airspeeds about 12.8 knots higher than the recorded ground speeds while the airplane was on final approach to runway 27. At 1603:34, the airplane crossed the runway threshold at a calculated airspeed of 48.4 knots. At 1603:37, the airplane turned right away from the runway heading at a calculated airspeed of 46.9 knots. At 1603:41, the airplane's heading was 357°, and it had a calculated airspeed of 44.1 knots. A review of the recorded data did not reveal any anomalies with engine operation during the flight.

After the accident, the witness saw the pilot's dog, who had been onboard the airplane, running out of the cornfield where the airplane had crashed. First responders were able to catch the dog, who was treated for minor injuries by a local veterinarian. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 90, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 4-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Sport Pilot None
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/14/2014
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 7450 hours (Total, all aircraft), 10.6 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 5.4 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the 90-year-old pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with airplane single-engine land, airplane multiengine land, and instrument airplane ratings. His last aviation medical examination was on August 14, 2014, when he was issued a third-class medical certificate with the limitation that he must wear corrective lenses. On the application for his medical certificate, the pilot reported having accumulated 7,450 hours of total flight experience, of which 30 hours were flown within the previous 6 months. The medical certificate expired on August 31, 2016; however, federal regulations only required the pilot to possess a valid driver's license to operate the light sport airplane. According to local law enforcement, the pilot had a valid Iowa driver's license. A search of FAA records showed no previous accidents, incidents, or enforcement proceedings.

A comprehensive pilot logbook was not located during the investigation. An airplane use log recovered from the wreckage was used to calculate the pilot's recent flight experience. According to the airplane use log, he had flown 40.9, 16.8, 10.6, and 5.4 hours during the 1 year, 6 months, 90 days, and 30 days before the accident, respectively. The accident flight was about 57 minutes and was the only flight conducted within 24 hours of the accident. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: FLIGHT DESIGN GMBH
Registration: N62JN
Model/Series: CTSW NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2006
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Special Light-Sport
Serial Number: 06-01-09
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 2
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/18/2016, Condition
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 1323 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 28 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 664.25 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Rotax
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: 912 ULS
Registered Owner: Mooney of Monticello, Inc.
Rated Power: 100 hp
Operator: Mooney of Monticello, Inc.
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

The two-seat light sport airplane, serial number 06-01-09, manufactured in 2006, was a high-wing monoplane constructed of primarily carbon-fiber reinforced plastic. The airplane was powered by a 100-horsepower, 4-cylinder, Rotax 912 ULS reciprocating engine, serial number 5.645.807. The engine provided thrust through a fixed-pitch, three-blade, Neuform model CR3-65-47-101.6 propeller. The airplane was equipped with fixed-tricycle landing gear, wing flaps, and had a maximum gross weight of 1,323 pounds. The FAA issued the light sport airplane a special airworthiness certificate and associated operating limitations on March 29, 2006.

The airplane's hour meter indicated 664.25 hours at the accident site. At the time of the accident, the airframe, engine, and propeller had accumulated 664.25 total service hours. The engine had accumulated 225.25 hours since being overhauled on October 25, 2012. The last condition inspection of the airplane was completed on October 18, 2016, at 636.3 total airframe hours. Postaccident review of the maintenance records found no history of unresolved airworthiness issues.

According to the airplane's Pilot's Operating Handbook, the wings-level aerodynamic stall speed with flaps retracted (0°) and flaps fully extended (40°) is 42 and 39 knots, respectively. The minimum and maximum continuous engine speed for takeoff is 4,500 and 5,500 rpm, respectively.

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: MXO, 832 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1555 CDT
Direction from Accident Site:
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 5500 ft agl
Visibility: 10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 13 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 280°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.98 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 24°C / 13°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Monticello, IA (MXO)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Monticello, IA (MXO)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1506 CDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

A postaccident review of available meteorological data established that day visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site. At 1555, about 8 minutes before the accident, the MXO automated surface observing system reported wind from 280° at 13 knots, 10 miles surface visibility, few clouds at 5,500 ft above ground level, temperature 24°C, dew point 13°C, and an altimeter setting of 29.98 inches of mercury. 

Airport Information


Airport: Monticello Regional Airport (MXO)
Runway Surface Type: Grass/turf
Airport Elevation: 832 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 2316 ft / 90 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

MXO, a public airport located about 2 miles southeast of Monticello, Iowa, was owned and operated by the City of Monticello. The airport field elevation was 832 ft mean sea level. The airport had two runways, a concrete runway 15/33 (4,400 ft by 75 ft) and a turf runway 9/27 (2,316 ft by 90 ft). The airport was not equipped with an air traffic control tower.

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude: 42.219722, -91.158333 

The accident site was in a cornfield located adjacent to runway 27. All the airplane's major structural components and flight controls were accounted for at the accident site. The wreckage debris path and airplane damage were consistent with the airplane impacting the ground in a right-wing-down, nose-down pitch attitude while on a north-northeast heading. The initial point-of-impact (POI) was about 250 ft north of the runway centerline where fragments of the right wing tip were found. A propeller slash mark in the terrain and several fragments of a propeller blade were found about 24 ft northeast of the initial POI. The main wreckage, which consisted of the fuselage, left wing, empennage, and engine, was located 54 ft northeast of the initial POI. The fuselage was found inverted, and the cockpit's primary structure was heavily fragmented. The entire right wing had separated from the fuselage. The left wing remained partially attached to the fuselage.

First responders reported that fuel was leaking from the left wing root. Both cockpit flight control sticks were found installed. Flight control continuity to the ailerons could not be established due to impact damage; however, all observed separations were consistent with overstress. Flight control cable continuity for the stabilizer and rudder was established. A homemade plywood device was installed on the right-side passenger floorboard to prevent a passenger from inadvertently contacting the rudder pedals during flight. The removable device used a hinged, vertical panel to block access to the rudder pedals. Although the device was not approved to be installed in the airplane, there was no evidence that it interfered with the full movement of either control stick or the pilot-side rudder pedals. The main landing gear remained attached to the lower fuselage. The nose landing gear remained attached to the forward fuselage. The electronic flap control selector was found in the flaps fully extended (40°) position. The ignition switch was found selected to BOTH. The fuel valve control assembly was damaged during impact. The throttle control was found full forward. The engine choke control was found in an intermediate position. The brake control was found selected to OFF. The ballistic-recovery parachute handle was not pulled, and the safety pin was found installed. The activation cable to the rocket motor was cut before the wreckage was moved to prevent an inadvertent discharge.

The engine remained attached to the firewall, and the propeller hub remained attached to the crankshaft flange and spacer. The three-blade propeller exhibited blade damage consistent with rotation at impact. Two of the three propeller blades separated about 6 inches from the hub. The remaining propeller blade remained attached to the hub, but the outboard quarter of the blade had separated during impact. Several propeller fragments were located along the wreckage debris path. The engine did not exhibit any crankcase or cylinder fractures. No oil leaks were observed on the exterior engine components. The oil reservoir contained engine oil and no metallic debris. A partial disassembly of the mechanical oil pump did not reveal any anomalies. The sparkplugs exhibited features consistent with normal engine operation. Both carburetors remained attached to their respective induction tubes. The right carburetor contained residual fuel. The left carburetor contained no fuel. No contamination was observed in the carburetor bowls or their fuel screens. Internal engine and valve train continuity were confirmed as the crankshaft was rotated. Compression and suction were noted on all cylinders when the crankshaft was turned. The dual electronic ignition system appeared undamaged. Postaccident examination of the engine revealed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical malfunctions or failures that would have precluded normal operation. 

Medical And Pathological Information

The Iowa's Office of State Medical Examiner, Ankeny, Iowa, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The cause of death was attributed to multiple blunt-force injuries sustained during the accident. Toxicological test results from the autopsy were negative for alcohol and drugs in blood, and no alcohol was detected in vitreous.

The FAA's Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicology tests on specimens obtained during the pilot's autopsy. The toxicology results were negative for carbon monoxide and all tested drugs and medications. The testing detected 19 mg/dL of ethanol in urine; however, no ethanol was detected in blood. The ethanol detected in urine was consistent with postmortem alcohol production and not from ingestion.

Additional Information

According to the pilot's son, his father routinely flew with his dog in the right seat. The dog reportedly weighed between about 70 and 75 lbs. The pilot's son also confirmed that his father had fabricated the plywood device to prevent the right-seat passenger (or his dog) from inadvertently contacting the rudder pedals during flight.

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Got to fly for over 70 years! And how many people his age take no medications? Glad his companion survived.

Unknown said...

"4,833 rpm (takeoff power)" 5800 rpm is takeoff power in the Rotax 912 100 hp engine. At 4800 rpm the aircraft would have been producing a lot less power, I can look at the graph but probably somewhere about 65 hp instead of 100 hp. This is also validated by the fuel flow reported in the article which was nowhere near full power fuel flow ?

How would be NTSB get these basic things incorrect ? The pilot was not doing a full power go around but was probably only using half throttle at the time