Saturday, November 3, 2018

Piper PA-28-151 Warrior, N41618: Accident occurred February 21, 2016 at Northeast Florida Regional Airport (KSGJ), St. Augustine, St. Johns County, Florida


The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


http://registry.faa.gov/N41618




Location: St. Augustine, FL

Accident Number: ERA16LA119
Date & Time: 02/21/2016, 2015 EST
Registration: N41618
Aircraft: PIPER PA28 151
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Fire/smoke (non-impact)
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional 

On February 21, 2016, about 2015 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-28-151, N41618, was substantially damaged by an engine fire after landing at Northeast Florida Regional Airport (SGJ), St. Augustine, Florida. The flight instructor and his pilot-rated student were not injured. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.


According to the flight instructor, the airplane's engine stopped producing power during taxi immediately after landing. An engine restart was attempted, and the engine caught fire. The airplane was stopped, and both the instructor and the student egressed the airplane, but made no attempt to extinguish the fire, as there was no fire extinguisher on board the airplane. Instead, the instructor dialed 911 on his cellular telephone.


The fire department on the airport was closed, and local police and fire responded to the call. The police arrived first, and were delayed at a perimeter gate, which was subsequently opened by airport personnel. The first police officer on scene suppressed the fire with a hand-held fire extinguisher from his cruiser until firefighters arrived and ensured the fire was fully extinguished shortly thereafter. The firefighters gained access through an entry point previously briefed and rehearsed with the airport authority.


Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector revealed that both the engine firewall and mount required replacement due to fire damage. The inspector asked the operator why no fire extinguisher was installed in the accident airplane. He said the airplane was a late addition to the school's fleet, and that he and his staff "forgot" to install one. All other airplanes at the school were equipped with fire extinguishers.


The instructor held a commercial pilot and flight instructor certificates with ratings for airplane single engine land, multiengine land and instrument airplane. His most recent third-class medical certificate was issued on January 18, 2016. The pilot reported 153 total hours of flight experience, of which 65 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.


The pilot held a private pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land. His most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on January 27, 2016. The instructor reported 895 total hours of flight experience, of which 20 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.


The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1974 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-320 series engine. A review of logbook entries by the FAA inspector revealed the airplane's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed July 27, 2015, at 7,717 total aircraft hours.


Review of the Pilot's Operating Handbook, Section 3, Emergency Procedures revealed that engine fires during start were usually the result of overpriming, and that the first attempt to extinguish the fire should be to try to start the engine and draw the excess fuel back into the induction system. 


Flight Instructor Information


Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial

Age: 22, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s):
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s):  Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:  Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/27/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  895 hours (Total, all aircraft), 65 hours (Total, this make and model), 800 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 210 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 80 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Pilot Information


Certificate: Private

Age: 37, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Sea
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/18/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  153 hours (Total, all aircraft), 20 hours (Total, this make and model), 77 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 33 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 26 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information


Aircraft Make: PIPER

Registration: N41618
Model/Series: PA28 151 151
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1974
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 28-7415295
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 07/27/2015, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2326 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 99 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 7816 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:
Engine Model/Series: O-320 SERIES
Registered Owner: SALE REPORTED
Rated Power: 150 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions

Condition of Light: Night/Bright
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSGJ, 10 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 0 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1958 EST
Direction from Accident Site: 235°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 7 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: /
Wind Direction: 160°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.12 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 18°C / 14°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: St. Augustine, FL (SGJ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: St. Augustine, FL (SGJ)
Type of Clearance: VFR
Departure Time: 1830 EST
Type of Airspace:

Airport Information


Airport: NORTHEAST FLORIDA RGNL (SGJ)

Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 9 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 13
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 8002 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Traffic Pattern

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 2 None

Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  29.959167, -81.339722 (est)













NTSB Identification: ERA16LA119 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Sunday, February 21, 2016 in St. Augustine, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA28 151, registration: N41618
Injuries: 2 Uninjured.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators may not have traveled in support of this investigation and used data provided by various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.


On February 21, 2016, about 2015 eastern standard time, a Piper PA-28-151, N41618, was substantially damaged by an engine fire after landing at Northeast Florida Regional Airport (SGJ), St. Augustine, Florida. The flight instructor and his pilot-rated student were not injured. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local instructional flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 CFR Part 91.


According to the flight instructor, the airplane's engine stopped producing power during taxi immediately after landing. An engine restart was attempted, and the engine caught fire. The airplane was stopped, and both the instructor and the student egressed the airplane, but made no attempt to extinguish the fire, as there was no fire extinguisher on board the airplane. Instead, the instructor dialed 911 on his cellular telephone.


The fire department on the airport was closed, and local police and fire responded to the call. The police arrived first, and were delayed at a perimeter gate, which was subsequently opened by airport personnel. The first police officer on scene suppressed the fire with a hand-held fire extinguisher from his cruiser until firefighters arrived and ensured the fire was fully extinguished shortly thereafter. The firefighters gained access through an entry point previously briefed and rehearsed with the airport authority.


Examination of the airplane by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) aviation safety inspector revealed that both the engine firewall and mount were substantially damaged during the fire.


The instructor held a commercial pilot and flight instructor certificates with ratings for airplane single engine land, multiengine land and instrument airplane. His most recent first-class medical certificate was issued on January 27, 2016. He reported 900 total hours of flight experience, of which 65 hours were in the accident airplane make and model.


The four-seat, single-engine, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1974 and was equipped with a Lycoming O-320 series engine. A review of logbook entries by the FAA inspector revealed the airplane's most recent 100-hour inspection was completed July 27, 2015, at 7,717 total aircraft hours.

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