Thursday, November 29, 2018

Ground Collision: Pilatus PC-12/45, N552TC and Cessna 172S Skyhawk SP, N976SP; accident occurred November 28, 2018 at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport (KIWA), Maricopa County, Arizona

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

N552TC Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


N552TC Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N552TC


Location: Mesa, AZ

Accident Number: GAA19CA079A
Date & Time: 11/28/2018, 0850 MST
Registration: N552TC
Aircraft: Pilatus PC12
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Defining Event: Ground collision
Injuries: 5 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

The pilot of the Pilatus reported that after he received his IFR clearance from the local air traffic controller, he taxied from the ramp to the taxiway. While turning onto the taxiway, he was further instructed by the controller to give way to an airplane on the same taxiway. He acknowledged the instruction, "stopped" the airplane, looked left and saw a Cessna, which already passed him, so he looked right, did not see any other airplanes on the taxiway and continued to taxi. Shortly after, he realized that the propellers struck something, so he immediately shut down the airplane, deplaned, and realized that he struck another Cessna he did not see.

The flight instructor in the Cessna reported that, while the student pilot was taxiing back to the ramp, they were instructed by the local air traffic controller to follow company traffic while passing another airplane, to their left, "holding" short of the same taxiway. He then looked left outside of his window and saw a spinning propeller moving closer towards the airplane. He immediately grabbed the controls and hammered the right pedal, but the propeller of the other airplane struck their airplane's left wing.

The Pilatus sustained damage to the propellers. The Cessna sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot and the flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with their airplanes that would have precluded normal operation.

A video provided by the airport authority showed that the Pilatus taxied left on to the taxiway from the ramp without stopping. It also showed that there was another airplane, further down the taxiway. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 37, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied:
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 2 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/01/2018
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 4439 hours (Total, all aircraft), 2187 hours (Total, this make and model), 4109 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Pilatus
Registration: N552TC
Model/Series: PC12 45
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 2002
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 443
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 8
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/18/2018, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 9921 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 3272 Hours
Engines: 1 Turbo Prop
Airframe Total Time:  at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: Pratt & Whitney Canada
ELT: C126 installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: PT6A-67B
Registered Owner: Daylight Nightlight Ez Flight Llc
Rated Power: 1200 hp
Operator: Daylight Nightlight Ez Flight Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135)

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIWA, 1382 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1547 UTC
Direction from Accident Site:231° 
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 25000 ft agl
Visibility:  45 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 130°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Mesa, AZ (IWA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: Unknown
Destination: Monterey, CA (MRY)
Type of Clearance: Unknown
Departure Time: 0840 MST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: PHOENIX-MESA GATEWAY (IWA)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 1383 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 12R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10401 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Minor
Passenger Injuries: 4 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 5 None
Latitude, Longitude: 33.307778, -111.655556 (est)


N976SP Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

N976SP  Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  
https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

https://registry.faa.gov/N976SP



Location: Mesa, AZ
Accident Number: GAA19CA079B
Date & Time: 11/28/2018, 0850 MST
Registration: N976SP
Aircraft: Cessna 172
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Ground collision
Injuries: 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Instructional

The pilot of the Pilatus reported that after he received his IFR clearance from the local air traffic controller, he taxied from the ramp to the taxiway. While turning onto the taxiway, he was further instructed by the controller to give way to an airplane on the same taxiway. He acknowledged the instruction, "stopped" the airplane, looked left and saw a Cessna, which already passed him, so he looked right, did not see any other airplanes on the taxiway and continued to taxi. Shortly after, he realized that the propellers struck something, so he immediately shut down the airplane, deplaned, and realized that he struck another Cessna he did not see.

The flight instructor in the Cessna reported that, while the student pilot was taxiing back to the ramp, they were instructed by the local air traffic controller to follow company traffic while passing another airplane, to their left, "holding" short of the same taxiway. He then looked left outside of his window and saw a spinning propeller moving closer towards the airplane. He immediately grabbed the controls and hammered the right pedal, but the propeller of the other airplane struck their airplane's left wing.

The Pilatus sustained damage to the propellers. The Cessna sustained substantial damage to the left wing.

The pilot and the flight instructor reported that there were no preaccident mechanical failures or malfunctions with their airplanes that would have precluded normal operation.

A video provided by the airport authority showed that the Pilatus taxied left on to the taxiway from the ramp without stopping. It also showed that there was another airplane, further down the taxiway.

Flight Instructor Information

Certificate: Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 28, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/01/2017
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 474.4 hours (Total, all aircraft), 234.4 hours (Total, this make and model), 260.3 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 96.1 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 74.3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Student Pilot Information

Certificate: Student
Age: 26, Male
Airplane Rating(s): None
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used:
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 Without Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/14/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 1.8 hours (Total, all aircraft), 1.8 hours (Total, this make and model), 1.8 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 1.8 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 1.8 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N976SP
Model/Series: 172 S
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 172S8198
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 11/19/2018, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2558 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection:
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 10630.1 Hours
Engine Manufacturer: Lycoming
ELT: C91A installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: IO360-L2A
Registered Owner: Atp Aircraft 4 Llc
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: Atp Aircraft 4 Llc
Operating Certificate(s) Held: Pilot School (141) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KIWA, 1382 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1547 UTC
Direction from Accident Site: 231°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 25000 ft agl
Visibility:  45 Miles
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: 130°
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 29.99 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / -1°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Mesa, AZ (IWA)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Mesa, AZ (IWA)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 0700 MST
Type of Airspace: Class D

Airport Information

Airport: PHOENIX-MESA GATEWAY (IWA)
Runway Surface Type: Concrete
Airport Elevation: 1383 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 12R
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 10401 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion:None 
Total Injuries: 2 None

Latitude, Longitude: 33.307778, -111.655556 (est)






Two small planes collided Wednesday morning at Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport, officials said. 

Two general aviation aircraft were involved in the incident at the airport near Ray and Power roads in Mesa, just before 9:40 a.m., said Ryan Smith, a spokesman for the Phoenix-Mesa Gateway Airport.  

No injuries or fires of any kind were reported, Smith said. 

The collision left debris scattered over the runway. The wing of one of the small planes was partially cut off and lying on the ground while the propellers of the other were broken and missing. 

The larger of the two planes, a Pilatus PC-12/45, a single-engine turboprop passenger and cargo aircraft, is registered to Daylight Nightlight EZ Flight LLC, a Scottsdale-based company. 

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.azcentral.com



MESA, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -- No injuries were reported after two planes collided at Mesa-Gateway Airport Wednesday morning. 

According to Deputy Chief Forrest Smith with Mesa Fire and Medical, two small planes struck each other on the runway just before 9 a.m.

There were seven people on board both planes and luckily no one was injured.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.azfamily.com

22 comments:

  1. It will be interesting to see this accident diagramed. There is no way it could have happened the way the planes are positioned now. The right wing of the Pilatus would have crushed the Cessna’s tail for the propeller to reach the left wing. If it was a head on, then the right wing would have got munched.

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  2. Let the paperwork begin. That incident was unfortunate but could have been much worse.

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  3. Yikes! It's a good thing Cessna has the wing fuel tanks located close to the fuselage otherwise when that whopper-chopper tore into the wing there would have been one giant explosion when the tank was breached. Glad no one was hurt and the Cessna can get another wing.

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  4. Honestly ... The Cessna backed into us.

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  5. Ok, that's it.

    The words "Maricopa County, Arizona" keep a frequent appearance in Kathryn's Report.

    I am staying away.

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  6. How does this happen? I do not think the C-172 was rolling backwards. I could be wrong though.

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  7. This was my first USAF duty station. Williams AFB (KCHD) was an Air Training Command UPT facility, hosting advanced pilot training students learning to fly T-37 and T-38 aircraft. There were also Saudi Arabian and Iranian maintenance personnel and pilots training to fly the F-5, with a TAC training unit equipped with Freedom Fighters. On any given weekday, the skies over Williams AFB looked like a beehive.

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  8. Good point, Anonymous. Hmm....Well, if the propeller on the Pilatus rotates clockwise from the cockpit, the force of that collision would cause the Cessna to rotate clockwise from the point of impact, with the tail (Horizontal Stabilizer) of the Cessna impeding further rotation by impacting the Pilatus. How's that for a SWAG?

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  9. “I was practicing IFR taxiing”

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  10. Anonymous, good point. Hmm, let's see....If the propeller on the Pilatus rotates clockwise from the cockpit perspective, the force of the collision would rotate the Cessna clockwise, with the Cessna Horizontal Stabilizer halting that rotation by colliding with the Pilatus fuselage. How's that for a SWAG?

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  11. I believe the 172 was suppose to take a right turn at Albuquerque. Obviously he didn't.

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  12. Somebody is at fault, no question about that.

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  13. Maybe he was texting - "What's for dinner'

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  14. He should have used his inertial separators

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  15. Jim B,
    Do you know that Maricopa County is LARGER than 4 states ? It is 9,200 square miles, with 10 airports of which 4 have major pilot training programs each with a average of 400 students a year.

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  16. to Jim B...Stay away?
    Not possible
    The county has probably 4 million people in it and includes Phoenix and Phoenix Airport.
    So I suppose you are not gonna fly into Phoenix anymore?

    Abie

    Maricopa County is a county in the south-central part of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population was 3,817,117, making it the state's most populous county, and the fourth-most populous in the United States. It is more populous than 23 states.Wikipedia

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  17. Yes, I will stay away.

    Despite your pride and you are welcome to have it I have no business there and I suspect you will be pleased if I do.

    Win/Win - we should all be happy.

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  18. The Non-Movement area at Mesa is so big and such a maze, I wonder where on the airport the incident occurred.

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