Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Runway Excursion: Cessna 182L Skylane, N3115R, accident occurred August 27, 2018 at Cranland Airport (28M), Hanson, Plymouth County, Massachusetts

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Burlington, Massachusetts

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms


https://registry.faa.gov/N3115R

Location: Hanson, MA
Accident Number: ERA18TA236
Date & Time: 08/27/2018, 1250 EDT
Registration: N3115R
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Runway excursion
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Skydiving 

On August 27, 2018, about 1250 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182L, N3115R, nosed over following a landing overrun at Cranland Airport (28M), Hanson, Massachusetts. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local skydiving flight, which originated at 28M and was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

The pilot reported completing a thorough preflight inspection and runup prior to the accident flight, noting that there were no mechanical malfunctions or failures with the airplane prior to the flight that would have precluded normal operation, and no abnormal indications or battery discharge indications during the runup preceding takeoff. A witness stated that the airplane was jump-started by a vehicle just prior to the accident flight.

About 2,000 ft during the initial climb, the airplane experienced a radio failure and the pilot noted a slight change in engine sound. He consulted with the jumpmaster and continued to climb to 7,500 ft to allow the two pairs of skydivers to jump. He reported engine roughness after the jumpers departed the airplane. He considered going to a nearby airport about 8 miles southeast that offered longer runways but did not want to go to an airport that was unfamiliar to him. Instead, he circled down over the airport, keeping his approach "a little faster and higher than normal" so that if the engine lost total power he could still reach the runway. After extending full flaps, he tried to "bleed off speed" and lose altitude as quickly as possible. He landed longer than usual but preferred to not execute a go-around due to the rough-running engine. Despite maximum braking, the airplane overran the departure end of runway 18, encountered a ditch, nosed over, and came to rest inverted.

According to the jumpmaster, he noted no engine problems or other anomalies besides the radio failure prior to jumping. Once on the ground, he observed the landing and left main tire smoking from the pilot "locking up the brakes." According to the second jumpmaster, once back on the ground he saw the airplane "arriving fast" and heard the airplane braking before it overran the runway.

A review of the airport video revealed that the airplane touched down near the midpoint of the 1,760-ft-long runway. Additionally, a Federal Aviation Administration who responded to 28M shortly after the accident noted a quartering tailwind for the airplane's direction of landing. The recorded wind at an airport located 8 miles southeast of the accident site, about the time of the accident, was variable at 5 knots.

The airplane came to rest inverted 183 ft beyond the departure end of runway 18. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the airframe sustained substantial damage to the fuselage, both wings, rudder, and vertical stabilizer. The flaps were in the extended position. The main landing gear tires both displayed significant tread wear on one side with visible holes in the tread area. The runway displayed tire skid marks with geometry consistent to the accident airplane for537 ft. Additionally, rim marks were evident 158 ft after the first contiguous skid marks.

Examination of the airplane revealed that the alternator belt was located off the pulleys and on the lower right side of the engine firewall. It was examined, and no anomalies were noted. The battery was disconnected during the accident sequence, with the left post separated at impact. For examination, a replacement battery was wired to the airplane and the flaps operated normally. A multimeter was applied to the accident battery and it indicated 12.3 volts. Except for the alternator belt located off the pully, the engine was examined and no evidence of preimpact mechanical malfunctions were observed. Testing of the brakes showed that they were operational and did not reveal evidence any preimpact mechanical anomalies.

Pilot Information

Certificate: Commercial
Age: 20, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Lap Only
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 04/07/2018
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 12/01/2017
Flight Time:  703.1 hours (Total, all aircraft), 392.3 hours (Total, this make and model), 572.7 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 242.5 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 47 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3115R
Model/Series: 182 L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1968
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 18258515
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 1
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 10/12/2017, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 3525 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 69 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 6167.51 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: Continental
ELT: Installed, activated, did not aid in locating accident
Engine Model/Series: O-470-U-50
Registered Owner: 516 Skydive Inc
Rated Power: 235 hp
Operator: Go Skydive Boston
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PYM, 148 ft msl
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Observation Time: 1252 EDT
Direction from Accident Site: 146°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4400 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility (RVR):
Wind Speed/Gusts: 5 knots /
Turbulence Type Forecast/Actual: None / None
Wind Direction: Variable
Turbulence Severity Forecast/Actual: N/A / N/A
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C / 19°C
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Hanson, MA (28M)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Destination: Hanson, MA (28M)
Type of Clearance: None
Departure Time: 1236 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class G

Airport Information

Airport: Cranland (28M)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 71 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 18
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 1760 ft / 60 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude:  42.022222, -70.837222 (est)

Location: Hanson, MA
Accident Number: ERA18TA236
Date & Time: 08/27/2018, 1256 EDT
Registration: N3115R
Aircraft: Cessna 182
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Skydiving 

On August 27, 2018, about 1256 eastern daylight time, a Cessna 182L, N3115R, nosed over following a landing overrun at Cranland Airport (28M), Hanson, Massachusetts. The commercial pilot was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plan was filed for the local skydiving flight, which originated at Cranland Airport and was operated under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he started carrying skydivers several days before the accident after familiarizing himself with the airport and airplane. The accident occurred on the fourth flight of the day. Around 2,000 ft during the initial climb, the airplane experienced a radio failure and the pilot noted a slight change in engine sound. He consulted with one of the tandem skydivers and continued to climb to 7,500 ft to allow the two pairs of skydivers to jump, which he felt was the safest course of action. He reported that the engine roughness increased after the jumpers departed the airplane, so he spiraled down over the airport and kept his approach "a little faster and higher than normal" so that if the engine failed he could still reach the runway. He considered going to a nearby, longer runway, but did not want to go to an airport that was unfamiliar to him given the roughness of the engine. He extended the flaps when the landing was assured and noted that the flaps were moving slowly. After setting full flaps, he tried to "bleed off speed" and lose altitude as quickly as possible. He realized he landed longer than usual but preferred that to going around because of the rough running engine. Despite maximum braking, the airplane overran the departure end of runway 18, encountered a ditch, nosed over, and came to rest inverted.

One of the skydivers, who had accumulated over 10,000 jumps, reported that the "flight felt good at all times" and that about 4,000 ft he heard from the other skydiver that they would be doing a "low jump." Once back on the ground, he saw the airplane "arriving fast" and heard the airplane braking before it overran the runway.

A second skydiver reported that the radios began to "flicker" climbing through 1,200 ft. The pilot attempted to correct the problem and cycled the master switch, but the radios did not come back on when the electrical power was turned back on. He discussed the situation with the pilot and they decided it would be safer to climb to the minimum jump altitude of 7,500 ft rather than attempt a landing with the skydivers on the airplane. He reported some sputtering from the airplane just before they jumped and noted that the airplane "wasn't sounding great." Once on the ground, he remembered seeing the left main tire smoking from the pilot "locking up the brakes," and he started running toward the airplane when he realized that it was not going to stop on the runway.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, airplane multi-engine land, and instrument airplane. The pilot was issued a first-class medical certificate on April 7, 2018, with the limitation, "must wear corrective lenses." Review of flight experience documents revealed that the pilot reported 656 hours of flight experience on the day of the accident.

The airplane came to rest inverted 183 feet beyond the departure end of runway 18, which was 1,760 ft long. Examination of the wreckage revealed that the airframe sustained substantial damage. The aft portion of the fuselage was buckled and crushed downward, and the upper portion of the vertical stabilizer was buckled. In addition, the nose landing gear was impact separated.

At 1152, the weather reported at Plymouth Municipal Airport (PYM), about 8 miles southeast of the accident site, included wind from 300° at 9 knots, visibility of 10 miles, few clouds at 3,600 feet, temperature 30° C, dew point 19° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.05 inches of mercury. At 1252, the weather included variable winds at 5 knots, visibility 10 miles, few clouds at 4,400 feet, temperature 31° C, dew point 19° C; and an altimeter setting of 30.04 inches of mercury. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Make: Cessna
Registration: N3115R
Model/Series: 182 L
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: Go Skydive Boston
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: PYM, 148 ft msl
Observation Time: 1252 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 8 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 31°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 4400 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 5 knots / , Variable
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Hanson, MA (28M)
Destination:  Hanson, MA (28M) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 42.022222, -70.837222 (est)








A 22-year-old pilot was taken to a hospital with minor injuries after his plane rolled over on the runway Monday afternoon at Cranland Airport in Hanson, Massachusetts.

Authorities said the incident happened at about 1 p.m. at the small public airport.

The pilot, Jacob Haselden, told NBC10 Boston, he was able to get out of the Cessna 182 Skylane on his own. He was taken to South Shore Hospital by a Hanson Fire Department ambulance.

Police said they believe Haselden overshot the runway while landing, went off the runway and hit a dirt road, causing it to flip onto its roof.

Haselton, who has 6 years of flying experience, said he was with two tandem skydivers before the accident.

"We flew up and I had difficulties with the engine, and I managed to get everyone out and came back in for a landing, couldn't make it," Haselton said.

The crash will be investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board.

"We documented the tracks and so once we take a good look at the photographs, we'll be able to find that information and it will be in our factual report," said Heidi Kemner with the NTSB.

The plane, which belongs to Go Skydive Boston, has been taken to a hangar at the airport where the NTSB is conducting their investigation.

The airport's manager said the pilot is a Go Skydive Boston employee.

"The flipping was me running out of runway because I was coming in too fast due to difficulties with my engine and the flaps and various plane issues," Haselden said.

He went on to say that he feels fortunate that the crash did not end worse.

"I just tried to do the safest option and do what I thought was best," Haselden said. 

Cranland Airport had a fatal crash following a take-off from its runway on Friday. Scott Landis, the pilot, was killed in the small aircraft crash while his brother, Patrick Landis, was critically injured.

The brothers had taken to the skies to spread their father's ashes, a family spokesperson said.

Hanson Town Manager Mike McCue said despite the recent incidents, there haven't been any issues at the airport.

"The town speaks on a regular basis with the airport and with the manager and again, as I've said, we've really never had any problems," said McCue. "The airport is run very well and these instances, thank God, are few and far between."

Story and video ➤ https://www.necn.com

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