Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Piper PA-46-310P Malibu, N148ME: Accident occurred May 29, 2018 near Ernest A. Love Field (KPRC), Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Scottsdale, Arizona

1st Avenue Malibu Services LLC

http://registry.faa.gov/N148ME

NTSB Identification: GAA18CA312
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Tuesday, May 29, 2018 in PRESCOTT, AZ
Aircraft: PIPER PA 46, registration: N148ME

NTSB investigators will use data provided by various entities, including, but not limited to, the Federal Aviation Administration and/or the operator, and will not travel in support of this investigation to prepare this aircraft accident report.

Aircraft was inbound with "critical fuel" and crashed 4 to 5 miles short of the Ernest A. Love Field (KPRC).

Date: 30-MAY-18
Time: 04:20:00Z
Regis#: N148ME
Aircraft Make: PIPER
Aircraft Model: PA46
Event Type: ACCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: No
Damage: SUBSTANTIAL
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: LANDING (LDG)
City: PRESCOTT
State: ARIZONA




The pilot of a small plane, knowing that he was running out of fuel, couldn’t quite make it to Prescott's Ernest A. Love Airport. So, he attempted a landing on Iron Springs Road. 

"He was either a rockstar or really, really lucky," said John Stonecipher, CEO of Guidance Aviation. Stonecipher, who lives near Iron Springs Road, came to see the accident site. 

Tom Juliani, General Manager of Legend Aviation and the Chairman of the Airport Advisory Commission, agreed. "It was a good landing. There’s an old adage, 'Any landing you walk away from, is a good landing."

As the plane landed, it didn’t damage any buildings, hit any cars or injure anyone on the ground. By the time the Prescott Fire Department arrived (and they were on their way already) the pilot and two occupants were out of the plane and walking along the sidewalk. 

Tom Juliani, General Manager of Legend Aviation and the Chairman of the Airport Advisory Commission, agreed. "It was a good landing. There’s an old adage, 'Any landing you walk away from, is a good landing."

As the plane landed, it didn’t damage any buildings, hit any cars or injure anyone on the ground. By the time the Prescott Fire Department arrived (and they were on their way already) the pilot and two occupants were out of the plane and walking along the sidewalk. 

Prescott Police Department issued the following statement from Deputy Chief of Police Amy Bonney:

On May 29, 2018 at approximately 9:12 PM the FAA at the Prescott airport contacted the Prescott Police Department regarding an inbound passenger plane, which was possibly running low on fuel and reporting the potential of an emergency landing.  Initial indications were that the pilot might attempt a landing in the area of State Route 89 and State Route 69. However, a short time later, the plane made an emergency landing near the 1500 block or Iron Springs Road. 

Responding personnel located a small Malibu Piper single nose-prop aircraft, which had in fact landed, in the middle of Iron Springs Road. The plane was carrying three individuals bound for Prescott from the Los Angeles area and the pilot indicated the plane had run out of fuel forcing the landing. It appears the plane may have struck a light pole in the area, causing the wing to shear off and the plane to roll onto its roof.

The pilot and the two passengers were transported to YRMC, West campus for non-life threatening injuries. Their current condition is unknown.

As the plane was landing, a vehicle stopped in the roadway and was rear-ended by another vehicle. No one sustained injury during that related crash.

The road way was closed for a period of time during the investigation, but is expected to be open before morning.

The investigation is ongoing and further efforts will be coordinated through the Prescott Airport Operations Team in conjunction with the FAA. 

Original article ➤ https://www.prescottenews.com











PRESCOTT, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) - A plane bound for Prescott from the Los Angeles area was forced to make an emergency landing after it ran out of fuel late Tuesday night, according to the Prescott Police Department.

The FAA and Prescott Police Department were notified about an incoming passenger plane that was low on fuel and reported the potential of an emergency landing around 9:12 p.m.

The pilot initially indicated that they might attempt to land the plane in the area of State Route 89 and State Route 69, said police. However, the plane made an emergency landing near 1500 Iron Springs Road in Prescott.

The small Malibu Piper single nose-prop aircraft landed in the middle of the road and was carrying three individuals, said police. The pilot told police that the plane had run out of fuel, forcing the landing.

During the landing, police said it appears the plane may have struck a light pole in the area, shearing the wing off and causing the plane to roll onto its roof.

The pilot and two passengers were transported to a local hospital with non-life-threatening injuries. Their current condition is unknown, said police.

While the plane was landing, police said a vehicle stopped in the roadway and was rear-ended by another vehicle. No injuries were sustained during that crash, however.

The roadway is expected to be closed for a period of time during the investigation but is expected to reopen before morning.

The investigation into the emergency plane landing is ongoing and will be coordinated through the Prescott Airport Operations Team in conjunction with the FAA, said police.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.azfamily.com




An aircraft that ran out of fuel crashed and flipped on Iron Springs Road as it attempted to make an emergency landing Tuesday night.

According to Prescott Airport officials, three passengers on board the plane survived the crash with minor injuries. The two males and one female were taken to Yavapai Regional Medical Center in Prescott to be evaluated.

The report of the crash came in at 9:12 p.m.

The 6-seater, Piper Malibu aircraft originated out of John Wayne Airport in Orange County, California, with Prescott listed as its destination.

“We understand that the pilot contacted the tower with a low fuel emergency request,” said Robin Sobotta, director of Prescott Airport. “They were approved to proceed to Prescott for an emergency landing but they did not make it.”

The plane was attempting to land west to east on Iron Springs Road in the 1500 block, crashing about 100 yards west of the Iron Springs Cafe when its right wing clipped a light pole and flipped the aircraft.

“It was a remarkable landing considering the extreme circumstances, landing at night on a road that has some curves to it,” Sobotta said. “We are very, very relieved that the outcome was no major injuries and no fatalities.

“We also are very fortunate that, at this time of the evening, traffic was limited on the roadway,” Sobotta said.

Besides the light pole, no buildings or structures were damaged in the crash.

Two cars were involved in a rear-end accident after the plane hit the ground. Police believe the distraction of the wreckage and emergency vehicle lights may have played a role in the car crash, said Officer Matt Medina with the Prescott Police Department.

A tow company was called to transport the aircraft to the Prescott Airport where it will be reviewed by investigators. It was expected that the wreckage would be cleared and roads reopened by midnight.

“I’d like to acknowledge the Prescott police and fire department personnel for the way they quickly responded and secured the scene so that no additional injuries or accidents occurred,” Sobotta said. The City of Prescott Airport Department also responded to the crash.

The names of the pilot and passengers are not being released at this time.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.dcourier.com

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

assuming no mechanical issues, the pilot is grossly negligent. Passengers really need to consider carefully before they get on an airplane for a non-commercial flight. to many non-professional pilots killing their passengers or coming close to it.

Jim B said...


A very, very expensive mistake. Glad to hear that despite other factors, they survived.

Anonymous said...

running out of fuel in good weather. one of the dumbest things a pilot and do.

Anonymous said...

By no fuel in the tanks, no fire as a result of the wing being torn off saved there lives. BUT,it should have never happened in the first place (poor flight planning).

Anonymous said...


So how many airports did superman fly past before he determined he was critical fuel?

When the FAA gets finished with him he'll be too sore to sit for a week.

Bernard Freeman said...

I owned an similar 1986 Malibu for 29 years. I don't understand how anyone can run out of fuel 1:33 after taking off in an airplane that burns 16gph and has 120 gallon tanks. I wonder if the pilot had even one hour of type specific instruction.

Jim B said...


In my ignorance I am beginning to recognize a trend that others have likely known for a long time.

(1) There are the everyday folk who have incidents, etc. Names and passengers are mentioned and condolences are offered. People are usually not sneaking around. I fall into this category. I will coin a term "non-political" incident.

(2) Then there are the extraordinary and connected folk who also have incidents. Names, companies and passengers are not mentioned. Sneaking around can be, but is not always involved. I will coin a second term "political" incident.

It is the degree of "hush" factor I find interesting to observe.





LtCol Camilleri said...

“”Anonymous said...
running out of fuel in good weather. one of the dumbest things a pilot and do.””

Running out of fuel period is negligent, especially with fuel flow and range data computers as in the -46. However, running out of fuel in bad weather is truly the “dumbest” and nearly always fatal, regardless of equipment.

Anonymous said...

I know the pilot very well and have flown with them many times. This was not pilot error but a fuel system malfunction. I praise them for taking a bad situation and making the best of it without killing anyone.