Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Piper PA-28-181 Archer III, N199PA, operated by Fort Myers Flying Club: Fatal accident occurred June 24, 2017 near Page Field Airport (KFMY), Fort Myers, Lee County, Florida

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Analysis 

The private pilot and passenger were departing on a cross-country flight. Shortly after takeoff, the engine experienced a partial loss of power and the airplane would not climb. The pilot chose to perform a forced landing to a road, during which the airplane impacted a building, then the ground; a postimpact fire ensued.

The airplane was operated by a flying club. On two separate occasions before the accident, two different pilots experienced a loss of engine power in the accident airplane. About 1 month before the accident, a pilot experienced a partial loss of engine power shortly after takeoff; he subsequently landed the airplane on the remaining runway. Following that incident, a maintenance inspection revealed no anomalies. Maintenance personnel flushed both right and left fuel tanks, installed new fuel cap seals, drained the carburetor fuel bowl, cleaned and inspected the fuel filter, and flushed the fuel lines. A subsequent test run of the engine revealed no anomalies. Another pilot reported that, about 2 weeks before the accident, while in cruise flight at 8,000 ft, the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot was able to restart the engine at an altitude of 3,000 ft and uneventfully performed a precautionary landing. A subsequent maintenance inspection did not reveal any anomalies.

Postaccident examination of the engine did not reveal any preimpact mechanical malfunctions. Continuity of the crankshaft and camshaft were observed during manual rotation of the engine and the interiors of each cylinder revealed no anomalies. However, postimpact fire damage precluded a thorough examination of the ignition, fuel, and induction systems, and the reason for the partial loss of engine power could not be determined based on the available information.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be: 

A partial loss of engine power during initial climb for reasons that could not be determined because extensive fire damage precluded thorough examination of the engine and its associated systems.

Findings

Not determined
Not determined - Unknown/Not determined (Cause)

Marc David Scott

Marc David Scott, 37, of Cape Coral, Florida, passed away June 24, 2017 in Fort Myers, Florida. Marc was a loving young man who lived life to the fullest and leaves a great void in our lives. As many know, Marc never met a stranger. He made you smile as he entered the room. He found joy in each day, whether soaring above the clouds, sailing across blue waters or finding solace in the mountains. Life was an adventure cut too short. 

 
The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Tampa, Florida
Piper Aircraft Co.; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming; Atlanta, Georgia

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

http://registry.faa.gov/N199PA



Daniel P. Boggs, Investigator In Charge (IIC), National Transportation Safety Board.

Aviation Accident Factual Report - National Transportation Safety Board 

Location: Fort Myers, FL
Accident Number: ERA17FA210
Date & Time: 06/24/2017, 0748 EDT
Registration: N199PA
Aircraft: PIPER PA28
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Loss of engine power (total)
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

HISTORY OF FLIGHT

On June 24, 2017, about 0748 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA28-181, N199PA, impacted a building and terrain during a forced landing shortly after takeoff from Page Field Airport (FMY), Fort Myers, Florida. The private pilot sustained serious injuries and the pilot-rated passenger was fatally injured; the airplane was destroyed by a postimpact fire. The airplane was operated by Fort Myers Flying Club in accordance with the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the personal flight, which was destined for Marion County Airport, Dunnellon, Florida.

The pilot stated that he conducted a normal preflight inspection of the airplane and observed no anomalies. He sampled fuel from both of the fuel tanks twice and found no water or debris. The engine start was normal with all instruments in the normal operating range, and he observed similar indications during the engine run-up. After starting the takeoff roll, he verified the engine power output, which was 2,450 rpm. The airplane lifted off the runway at 65 knots, and the pilot pitched the airplane to 5° nose up, with a goal of 80 knots airspeed. At 75 knots, he felt a loss of engine power and the indicated engine rpm started to decrease. He switched fuel tanks and applied carburetor heat, but the engine continued to lose power. The pilot decided to make a forced landing on a nearby road. He turned right to line up with the road, but the wing contacted a tree and the airplane collided with the side of a building before impacting the ground.

A member of the flying club reported that he had experienced a loss of engine power in the accident airplane about 1 month before the accident when he was going to make a short flight to Orlando. During the initial climb after takeoff, about 100 ft above ground level, the engine experienced a partial loss of power. The pilot quickly reduced engine power further and landed straight-ahead on the remaining runway. The pilot taxied the airplane to a local maintenance facility, where maintenance personnel flushed the right and left fuel tanks, installed new fuel cap seals, drained the carburetor fuel bowl, cleaned and inspected the fuel filter, and flushed the fuel lines. They conducted a test run of the engine and found no anomalies. About 1 week later, another pilot was flying the accident airplane in cruise flight at 8,000 ft when the engine experienced a total loss of power. The pilot was maneuvering the airplane to land at a local airport when, at 3,000 ft, the engine regained power. The pilot decided to make a precautionary landing at the closest airport and have a local maintenance inspect the airplane. The maintenance facility took fuel samples and stated they were blue and clear of debris. The intake tube was unobstructed, and the engine performed satisfactorily during ground test runs.



PERSONNEL INFORMATION

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He held an FAA third-class medical certificate issued January 5, 2017. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 523 total hours of flight experience. The pilot reported a total flight experience of 535 hours at the time of the accident, of which 155 hours were in the accident airplane make and model. The pilot had flown 13 and 2.7 hours during the 90-day and 30-day periods preceding the accident, respectively.

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION

The four-seat, low-wing airplane was manufactured in 1999. It was powered by a Lycoming O-360-A4M, 180-horsepower engine, equipped with a two-blade Sensenich propeller.

According to the airplane logbook, the last annual inspection was performed on June 20, 2017. At that time, the airplane had accumulated a total time of 1,847.1 hours on both the airframe and engine.

METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION

The 0753 recorded weather at FMY included wind from 100° at 4 knots, visibility 10 statute miles, and a clear sky.

WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION

The airplane came to rest against a building across the street from the airport. The airframe was examined at the accident site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The engine compartment, cockpit, cabin area, empennage and the majority of both wings were consumed by post-crash fire. Flight control cable continuity was confirmed from the cockpit area to the flight control surfaces. The two-blade propeller fractured off the engine and was located in the ceiling of the building. One blade exhibited "S" bending; the other blade was fractured in several pieces. The starter ring gear, starter ring gear support, cowling, and windshield pieces were located inside the building.

The engine was moved to a hangar at FMY for further examination. The rear-mounted engine accessories were damaged in the postcrash fire. The engine initially could not be rotated by hand due to impact damage to the No. 2 cylinder. The cylinders were removed, and the crankshaft was rotated by hand. Continuity of the crankshaft to the rear accessory gears and to the camshaft was confirmed. Continuity to the valvetrain was confirmed by visual examination. The interiors of the cylinders exhibited no anomalies. The magnetos and carburetor were fire damaged and could not be inspected.



MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION

An autopsy was performed on the pilot-rated passenger by the Office of the Medical Examiner, Fort Myers, Florida. The report listed the cause of death as blunt force trauma.

Forensic toxicology was performed on specimens from the pilot-rated passenger by the FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The results were negative for drugs and carbon monoxide. 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 55, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 3 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 01/05/2017
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent: 
Flight Time:  555 hours (Total, all aircraft), 158 hours (Total, this make and model), 509 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 32 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 3 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft), 0 hours (Last 24 hours, all aircraft) 

Pilot-Rated Passenger Information

Certificate: Private
Age: 37, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): None
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): None
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 3 Unknown
Last FAA Medical Exam: 02/04/2016
Occupational Pilot: No
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 115 hours (Total, all aircraft), 9999 hours (Total, this make and model)



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N199PA
Model/Series: PA28 181
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1999
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 2843218
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats: 4
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 06/20/2017, 100 Hour
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 2550 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 5 Hours
Engines: 1 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 1847.1 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: O&VO-360 SER
Registered Owner: CUB CLUB INC DBA
Rated Power: 180 hp
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: FMY, 18 ft msl
Observation Time: 1153 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 311°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Temperature/Dew Point: 26°C / 26°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility: 10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 4 knots, 100°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 30.04 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration:
Departure Point: Fort Myers, FL (FMY)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: DUNNELLON, FL (X35)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0745 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D 

Airport Information

Airport: PAGE FIELD (FMY)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 17 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 13
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 4912 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Forced Landing 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Serious
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious
Latitude, Longitude:  26.578611, -81.852778 (est)


























NTSB Identification: ERA17FA210 
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Saturday, June 24, 2017 in Fort Myers, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA 28-181, registration: N199PA
Injuries: 1 Fatal, 1 Serious.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 24, 2017, about 0748 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA28-181, N199PA, impacted a building and terrain during takeoff from Page Field Airport (FMY), Fort Myers, Florida. The pilot incurred serious injuries and the pilot-rated passenger was fatally injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the flight to Marion County Airport (X35), Dunnellon, Florida. The personal flight was conducted in accordance with the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91.

According to the pilot, he conducted a normal preflight inspection of the airplane and noted no anomalies. He sampled fuel from the fuel tanks twice and found no water or debris. The engine start was normal with all instruments in the normal operating range, and he observed similar indications during the engine run-up. He further stated that he started his takeoff roll and verified the engine RPM was reaching 2,450. He lifted off the ground at 65 knots and pitched the airplane to 5 degrees nose up, with a goal of 80 knots. At 75 knots, he felt a loss of engine power and the RPMs started to decrease. He switched fuel tanks and applied carb heat, but the engine continued to lose power. The pilot decided to make an emergency landing on a nearby street. He turned to the right to line up with the street but the wing contacted a tree and then hit the side of a building.

The airplane came to rest against a building across the street from the airport. The airframe wreckage was examined at the accident site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The engine compartment, cockpit, cabin area, empennage and the majority of both wings were consumed by post-crash fire. Flight control cable continuity was confirmed from the cockpit area to the flight control surfaces. The two-bladed propeller fractured off the engine and was located in the ceiling of the building. One blade exhibited "S" bending and the other blade was fractured in several pieces. The starter ring gear, starter ring gear support, cowling and windshield pieces were located in the building.

According to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land and instrument airplane. He held an FAA third-class medical certificate, issued January 5, 2017. At the time of the medical examination, the pilot reported 523 total hours of flight experience.
The four seat, low-wing airplane, was manufactured in 1999. It was powered by a Lycoming O-360-A4M, 180-horsepower engine, equipped with a two-blade Sensenich propeller.

The engine and airframe were retained for further investigation.

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