Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Quest Kodiak 100, N969TB: Fatal accident occurred February 27, 2018 in Georgetown, Putnam County, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:

Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida
Quest Aircraft Company; Sandpoint, Idaho

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Pegasus of Montana LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N969TB

Location: Georgetown, FL
Accident Number: ERA18FA092
Date & Time: 02/27/2018, 1930 EST
Registration: N969TB
Aircraft: QUEST AIRCRAFT COMPANY LLC KODIAK 100
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On February 27, 2018, about 1930 eastern standard time, a Quest Kodiak 100, N969TB, was substantially damaged after it impacted a river near Georgetown, Florida. The private pilot and pilot-rated passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by an individual as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal flight. Night visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and there was no flight plan filed for the flight, which was destined for Mount Royal Airport (3FL0), Welaka, Florida.

According to preliminary air traffic control data provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), a radar target identified as the accident airplane overflew 3FL0 and then proceeded to make a right turn toward and over the Ocala National Forest. It circled back to the airport, overflew it, and entered a left turn. The airplane continued the left turn, again overflew the airport, and impacted a river that was about 1 mile to the west of the airport.

According to a witness, the airplane departed 3FL0 on the day of the accident around 1530. Another witness, observed the airplane shortly before the accident and noted that it was flying "really low," and was in a 45° bank left turn, "wobbled" once, and then continued the turn. In addition, she noted that the lights on the airplane had "halos" around them because it was foggy, and that the engine sounded "fine."

Local law enforcement and recovery personnel reported that there were no downed tree branches and no down powerlines in the along the shore in the vicinity of the accident site. Furthermore, recovery personnel noted several gallons of Jet A fuel draining from the airplane during recovery.

According to FAA records, the pilot held a private pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, single-engine sea, multiengine land, multiengine sea, and instrument airplane. The pilot was issued a third-class medical certificate on November 27, 2016. At that time, he reported 3,400 hours of total flight time, of which the 20 hours were within the previous 6 months of the medical examination.

According to FAA records, the pilot-rated passenger held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine land and airplane multiengine sea. He held commercial certificate ratings for airplane single-engine land and airplane single-engine sea. In addition, he held a flight instructor certificate with ratings for airplane multiengine and instrument airplane. His most recent second-class medical certificate was issued on October 4, 2013.

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 2016 and issued an airworthiness certificate in April 2016. In addition, it was equipped with a Pratt and Whitney Canada PT6A-34, 750-horsepower engine that powered a 4-bladed Hartzell constant speed propeller.

The 1915 recorded weather observation at Palatka Municipal Airport – Lt. Kay Larkin Field (28J), Palatka, Florida, which was about 13 miles to the north of the accident location, included wind from 050° at 8 knots, visibility 10 miles, overcast clouds at 1,500 feet above ground level, temperature 17° C, dew point 15° C, and an altimeter setting of 30.25 inches of mercury.

The airplane impacted a river and came to rest inverted in about 10 feet of water. All major components of the airplane were recovered from the river except the outboard section of the left wing and the left aileron. The forward section of the fuselage was impact-crushed aft. The right wing was impact separated from the fuselage and when the wing was moved for the wreckage examination, an unquantified amount of jet A fuel drained from the wing. The left wing was impact separated from the fuselage and the left flap was separated from the left wing. The flap jackscrew was measured and corresponded to a full flap position. The empennage remained attached to the fuselage and the horizontal stabilizers and elevators were cut to facilitate recovery. Flight control continuity was obtained from all flight control surfaces to the cockpit through tensile overload breaks and cuts made to facilitate recovery.

The propeller remained attached to the reduction gearbox but was separated from the engine. All four propeller blades remained attached to the hub and three were not in the feathered position. Two of the propeller blades exhibited S-bending, the other 2 blades were bent aft, and leading-edge gouging was noted on three of the blades.

The engine was impact-separated and recovered from the river. The left exhaust stack was impact crushed and the right exhaust stack received minor impact damage. The reduction gear box chip detector was examined, and no debris was noted. Continuity was confirmed between the compressor turbine and the accessory section of the engine by rotating the compressor turbine. Rotational scoring was noted on the compressor turbine. The power turbine was examined and exhibited rotation scoring on the fir tree disk, the blades, and the leading edge of the shroud tips. In addition, the power turbine shroud exhibited rotational scoring.

3FL0 was a private airport located about 3 miles south of Welaka, Florida. The airport elevation was estimated at 41 feet mean sea level. The airport did not have an operating control tower at the time of the accident. Runway 8/25 was 3,000 ft long and 50 ft wide. There were no published instrument procedures into the airport. The airport was bordered to the west by the Ocala National Forest, which was 673 square miles of densely wooded and unlighted terrain.

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: QUEST AIRCRAFT COMPANY LLC
Registration: N969TB
Model/Series: KODIAK 100 NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator:  PEGASUS OF MONTANA LLC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan


Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Night
Observation Facility, Elevation: 28J, 48 ft msl
Observation Time: 1915 EST
Distance from Accident Site: 13 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 15°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Thin Overcast / 1500 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 8 knots, 50°
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 1500 ft agl
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.25 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point:
Destination: Georgetown, FL (3FL0) 

Wreckage and Impact Information


Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  29.430556, -81.676389 (est)

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov.


Patrick Brian Magie, 56, of Cordova, Alaska died in an aircraft accident on Tuesday, Feb. 27, 2018 in Florida. He was born in Ely on October 31, 1961 and was a 1980 graduate of Ely High School. Pat was a lifetime bush pilot who loved to fly and was a great instructor. His flying career started early in life. Pat traveled the globe flying, instructing, and building a global network of friendships. 

Patrick was preceded in death by his mother Ferol Magie(Olsen) in December 27, 1999 in Duluth, MN. He is survived by his father William “Pat” Magie, 87, of Honolulu, Hawaii; sisters Kathryn “Katie” (Thomas) Prijatel of Cordova, Alaska and Kelly (Thomas) Grahek of Atlanta, Georgia and their daughter and two sons; and brother Scott Magie (Carol Hayes) of Park City, UT and Ely, and their two sons and daughter. The family will have a celebration in memory of Pat this spring.
http://www.elyecho.com

Two men are dead after a Quest Kodiak 100 they were flying crashed Tuesday night into the St. Johns River in southern Putnam County, according to the Florida Highway Patrol.

It was the third fatal airplane crash in Northeast Florida in the past six months.


The Putnam County Sheriff’s Office said deputies were called to the Fort Gates Ferry Road area about 7:30 p.m. for a report of a possible airplane crash. They found a  Quest Kodiak 100 had crashed into the river just south of Lake George.


Officials initially confirmed one fatality as the Florida Highway Patrol responded to conduct the initial investigation. The Sheriff’s Office dive team then began searching for a possible second man in the wreckage about 10 p.m. The pilot was identified as Michael Martin of Georgetown, Fla., whose age was unavailable. The passenger was Patrick Magie, 56, of Cordova, Ark., according to the Highway Patrol.


A Sheriff’s Office spokesman called it an “extremely challenging scene” with the tail of the mangled aircraft visible above the water.


The  Quest Kodiak 100 had taken off from the small Mount Royal Airpark just north of the Fort Gates Ferry landing, the Highway Patrol said. According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the plane is registered to Pegasus of Montana LLC, based in Williamstown, W.Va.


It’s unclear what caused the crash, but the  Quest Kodiak 100 was found upside down in about 12 feet of water, according to Times-Union news partner First Coast News.


The FAA said it will investigate the crash, while the National Transportation Safety Board had a wreck recovery company hired to remove the plane from the river. When the wreckage is on dry land, investigators will review it to determine the probable cause.


The private 3,000-foot-long airstrip is in a residential fly-in community called Mount Royal Airpark, three miles south of Welaka. Both victims also lived in the community, the Highway Patrol said.


Five people have died in the three private airplane crashes reported in Northeast Florida in recent months, according to investigators.


On July 14, a twin-engine Piper PA44 Seminole trainer aircraft crashed in the Matanzas River just south of the Marineland research center, killing 70-year-old Jeffrey Salan of Ormond Beach and student pilot Mohammed Alanazi, 27, of Saudi Arabia, according to the Flagler County Sheriff’s Office. Late Thanksgiving Day, Tennessee resident Herman E. Steele’s 1968 Mooney M20C Ranger aircraft crashed about 3:15 p.m. at the Camp Blanding Joint Training Center on Florida 16 just east of Starke, according to the Clay County Sheriff’s Office.


Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.jacksonville.com




ANCHORAGE (KTUU) - A Cordova man was killed in a small plane crash Tuesday near Jacksonville, Florida.

The Florida Highway Patrol responded at about 7:30 Tuesday evening to a small plane crash into a river in Crescent City, which is about 75 miles south of Jacksonville.

Patrick Magie, of Cordova, Alaska, and Michael Martin of Georgetown, Fl. were identified as the two men killed in the crash. The plane they were flying in was a Kodiak 100.

The Putnam County Sheriff's office told WNTV, the local NBC affiliate, that the plane was about 12 feet underwater, with the tail section being all that was left above the water.

The Florida Highway Patrol also said that both men lived in Mt. Royal Air Park Neighborhood, which is very close to the location of the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.ktuu.com


Two men were killed in a small plane crash Tuesday after their aircraft landed in the river near Crescent City Tuesday, according to the Putnam County Sheriff's Office (PCSO).

Dive teams recovered the second body from inside the underwater plane wreckage overnight.

PCSO said the plane crashed in the river after 7:29 p.m. The plane is now upside down near Fort Gates Ferry.

PCSO said the Quest Kodiak 100 is privately owned. They said the plane had two occupants on board at the time of departure.

Both men were found and search and rescue operations have been suspended. The Florida Highway Patrol and the National Transportation Safety Board will now investigate the cause of the crash.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.firstcoastnews.com




CRESCENT CITY, Fla. - Two people were found dead Tuesday night after a small plane crashed into the St. Johns River in southern Putnam County, according to the Sheriff's Office.

The Putnam County Sheriff's Office marine unit responded to assist in the search and found one person dead, and a second body was found hours later, just before midnight, by sheriff's deputies. Neither person has been identified.

The Quest Kodiak 100 crashed about 7:30 p.m. near Fort Gates Ferry Road in Crescent City -- less than two miles west of Mt. Royal Airport, a private runway.

“We can see through sonar images that the debris field is quite big, and the plane is heavily damaged and broken apart,” said Putnam County Chief Deputy Col. Joseph Wells.

Troopers told News4Jax that the privately owned plane was upside-down in the river and, according to Wells, the only part of the aircraft that was visible was the tail section. 

"This is a sophisticated airplane. It’s a $3 million jet prop that is purpose built for rough country operations, which is similar to the Cessna Caravan," aviation expert Ed Booth said. "The fact this happened at night. This is a very challenging area to fly over due to the darkness."

News4Jax Sports Director Sam Kouvaris, who's a Federal Aviation Administration-certified pilot, said it's not unusual for a light aircraft that has fixed landing gear to overturn in the water.

As soon as the landing gear touches the water, it flips upside down," Kouvaris said, adding that there's primarily two causes of small plane crashes -- either pilot error or a mechanical issue. 

Wells said boats from the sheriff's office and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will be on the water until the aircraft is removed.

He said he expects the plane to be lifted Wednesday morning and will have divers ready, if necessary.

The National Transportation Safety Board is expected to take over the investigation. In a statement released Wednesday morning, the FAA said local authorities will release the names and conditions of both people on board.

"The FAA will release the aircraft registration after that," the statement said. "The FAA will investigate and the NTSB will determine the probable cause of the accident.”

Local pilots, like Michael Anthony, said the crash is devastating news to the community. 

“I’m terribly sorry and sad, being a pilot, and know what that’s like. It’s a terrible thing to crash in an airplane," Anthony said. "That definitely affects me. It’s devastating for the community. To have a pilot pass in an accident like that. Flying is the safest form of transportation we have, so it’s a sad day."

The Putnam County Sheriff's Office reports that in 2004 a pilot was also killed when his plane crashed in the waters near Crescent City.

Original article can be found here ➤  https://www.news4jax.com




Action News Jax has confirmed a plane crash in Putnam County with the Putnam County Sheriff's Office.

Authorities tell Action News Jax the plane crashed in the St. Johns River and two people have been killed. 

Multiple law enforcement agencies including fire and rescue are on scene. 

Putnam County Sheriff's Office has confirmed that the plane crash is fatal and that there were two people on the Quest Kodiak 100.

PCSO said the wreckage is in 10 feet of water and there is a large debris field.

According to authorities, the plane took off from Mt. Royal Airport at 3pm. 

Col. Joseph Wells with PCSO said they have been able to retrieve a tail number from the plane and believe it is privately owned.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.actionnewsjax.com







Two people are dead following a Tuesday night airplane crash in southern Putnam County, according to Times-Union news partner First Coast News.

The Putnam County Sheriff's Office said its deputies were called to the Fort Gates Ferry Road area about 7:30 p.m. in reference to the report of a possible airplane crash. They found a small plane had crashed into the St. Johns River just south of Lake George.

Officials initially confirmed one fatality as the Florida Highway Patrol responded to conduct the initial investigation. The Sheriff's Office dive team then began searching for a possible second person in the wreckage about 10 p.m. A Highway Patrol spokesman called it an "extremely challenging scene" with the tail of the mangled aircraft visible above the water.

The Quest Kodiak 100 had taken off from the small Mount Royal Airport just north of the Fort Gates Ferry landing on the river, First Coast News reported. It's unclear what caused the crash, but the plane was found upside down in about 12 feet of water, First Coast News said.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.orlandosentinel.com



PUTNAM COUNTY, Fla. - Two people died when a plane plunged into the St. Johns River, the Putnam County Sheriff's Office said.

Deputies said it was a Quest Kodiak 100 that crashed.

The wreckage is in 10 feet of water and there is a large debris field.

Putnam County Col. Joseph Wells said that deputies have been able to retrieve a tail number from the plane and believe that it was privately owned.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.wftv.com

 
Mount Royal Airport (3FL0), Welaka, Putnam County, Florida


PUTNAM COUNTY, Fla. -  Two people have been found dead after a small plane crashed into the St. Johns River in southern Putnam County, according to the Putnam County Sheriff's Office.

Just around midnight, sheriff's deputies found the second body of a person who may have been on board the  Quest Kodiak 100. That plane crashed about 7:30 p.m. near Fort Gates Ferry Road in Crescent City -- less than two miles west of Mt. Royal Airport, a private runway.

Florida Highway Patrol officials said the plane landed upside down in the river, WJXT-TV reported.

"That's not unusual for a light aircraft that has fixed landing gear," said News4Jax's Sam Kouvaris, a Federal Aviation Administration-certified pilot. "As soon as the landing gear touches the water, it flips upside down."

He said there are typically two causes of small plane crashes: Pilot error or a mechanical issue.

The National Transportation Safety Board is expected to take over the investigation.

Original article can be found here ➤ https://www.clickorlando.com



Investigators are working to determine how a small plane lost altitude prior to crashing into a river in Putnam County.

Two men were killed in the plane crash Tuesday after their  Quest Kodiak 100 landed in the river near Crescent City Tuesday, according to the Putnam County Sheriff's Office.

PCSO said the plane crashed in the river after 7:29 p.m. The plane is now upside down near Fort Gates Ferry.

Florida Highway Patrol has asked for additional crew to help with the removal of the aircraft.

No comments: