Sunday, February 25, 2018

Piper PA-31-325 Navajo, N3591P, registered to and operated by Aero National Inc: Fatal accident occurred June 16, 2016 near University Park Airport (KUNV), State College, Benner Township, Centre County, Pennsylvania -and- Accident occurred September 09, 2012 at Washington County Airport (KAFJ), South Franklin Township, Pennsylvania

Captain Gary A. Orner


Dr. Robert Craig Arffa

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entities:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Piper Aircraft Inc; Vero Beach, Florida
Lycoming Engines; Williamsport, Pennsylvania

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board: https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

http://registry.faa.gov/N3591P


Brian C. Rayner,  Investigator In Charge 
National Transportation Safety Board

Location: State College, PA
Accident Number: ERA16FA215
Date & Time: 06/16/2016, 0830 EDT
Registration: N3591P
Aircraft: PIPER PA31
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Defining Event: Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT)
Injuries: 2 Fatal
Flight Conducted Under: Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled

Analysis 

The commercial pilot was completing an instrument flight rules air taxi flight on a route that he had flown numerous times for the customer on board. Radar and voice communication data revealed that the airplane was vectored to the final approach course for the precision approach and was given a radio frequency change to the destination airport control tower frequency. The tower controller issued a landing clearance, which the pilot acknowledged; there were no further communications with the pilot. Weather conditions at the airport at the time of the accident included an overcast ceiling at 300 ft with 1 mile visibility in mist.

The wreckage was located in densely-wooded terrain. Postaccident examination revealed no evidence of any mechanical malfunctions or anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The wreckage path and evidence of engine power displayed by numerous cut tree branches was consistent with a controlled, wings-level descent with power.

A radar performance study revealed that, as the airplane crossed the precision final approach fix 6.7 nautical miles (nm) from the runway threshold, the airplane was 800 ft above the glideslope. At the outer marker, 5.5 nm from the runway threshold, the airplane was 500 ft above the glideslope. When radar contact was lost 3.2 nm from the threshold, the airplane was about 250 ft above the glideslope. Although the airplane remained within the lateral limits of the approach localizer, its last two recorded radar returns would have correlated with a full-downward deflection of the glideslope indicator in the cockpit, and therefore, an unstabilized approach.

Further interpolation of radar data revealed that, during the last 2 minutes of the accident flight, the airplane's rate of descent increased from 400 ft per minute (fpm) to greater than 1,700 fpm, likely as a result of pilot inputs. During the final minute of the flight, the rate decreased briefly to 1,000 fpm before radar contact was lost. The company's standard operating procedures stated that, if a rate of descent greater than 1,000 fpm was encountered during an instrument approach, a missed approach should be performed.

The airplane's relative position to the glideslope and its rapid changes in descent rate after crossing the outer marker suggest that the airplane never met the operator's stabilized approach criteria. Rather than executing a missed approach procedure as outlined in the company's operating procedures, the pilot chose to continue the unstabilized approach, which resulted in a descent into trees and terrain.

It is unlikely that the pilot's well-controlled diabetes and effectively treated sleep apnea contributed to the circumstances of this accident. However, whether or not the pilot's multiple sclerosis contributed to this accident could not be determined. 

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The pilot's decision to continue an unstabilized instrument approach in instrument meteorological conditions, which resulted in controlled flight into terrain. 

Findings

Aircraft
Descent/approach/glide path - Not attained/maintained (Cause)

Personnel issues
Aircraft control - Pilot (Cause)
Decision making/judgment - Pilot (Cause)
Predisposing condition - Pilot

Environmental issues
Clouds - Effect on operation (Cause)



Factual Information

History of Flight

Approach-IFR final approach
Controlled flight into terr/obj (CFIT) (Defining event)

On June 16, 2016, at 0830 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-31-325, N3591P, was destroyed when it collided with terrain while on approach to University Park Airport (UNV), State College, Pennsylvania. The airline transport pilot and the passenger were fatally injured. The airplane was owned and operated by Aeronational, Inc. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the on-demand air taxi flight, which was conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 135. The flight departed Washington County Airport (AFJ), Washington, Pennsylvania, about 0800.

According to the operator, the passenger was a regular customer who was routinely flown to UNV. The pilot was familiar with the passenger and the route and had completed the flight numerous times.

Radar and voice communication information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that, at 0824:35, air traffic control (ATC) provided the pilot with a heading to intercept the final approach course for the instrument landing system RWY 24 approach at UNV and cleared the airplane for the approach. At 0825:30, the pilot was advised that radar services were terminated and was instructed to contact the tower controller at UNV.

At 0825, the pilot contacted the UNV tower controller and announced, "…with you on the approach." The tower controller acknowledged the call and issued a landing clearance, which the pilot acknowledged. There were no further communications with the pilot despite multiple attempts by ATC.

At 0843:50, an airport operations ground vehicle operating at the approach end of runway 24 identified smoke in a wooded area about 1 mile northeast of the airport and notified control tower personnel. The source of the smoke was later identified as the accident airplane. 



Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor; Commercial
Age: 60, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: 3-point
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: No
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: Yes
Medical Certification: Class 1 Waiver Time Limited Special
Last FAA Medical Exam: 03/07/2016
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  (Estimated) 12493 hours (Total, all aircraft), 718 hours (Total, this make and model), 12099 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 91 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 19 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with ratings for airplane single-engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent FAA first-class medical certificate was issued March 7, 2016, with the limitation, "Not valid for any class after 3/31/2017." The pilot reported 12,400 total hours of flight experience on the date of the examination, 350 hours of which were during the previous 6 months.

Company training records indicated that the pilot had received the training required by the company's operations and training manuals. The pilot had completed the required annual ground training on January 18, 2016. His last airman competency check was completed satisfactorily on January 18, 2016, in the accident airplane. Pilot duty records indicated compliance with the flight and duty time requirements of Title 14 CFR Part 135. The pilot had just returned from 1 week of vacation, and the accident flight was his first flight since returning to duty. 



Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N3591P
Model/Series: PA31 325
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture: 1980
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 31-8012081
Landing Gear Type: Tricycle
Seats:
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 02/19/2016, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 6499 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 44 Hours
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 16040.1 Hours at time of accident
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT: Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TIO-540 SER
Registered Owner: AERONATIONAL INC
Rated Power: 325 hp
Operator: AERONATIONAL INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

According to FAA records, the airplane was manufactured in 1980. Its most recent annual inspection was completed February 19, 2016, at 15,999.6 total aircraft hours, about 44 hours before the accident.

The airplane was equipped with a King KAP/KFC 200 flight control system (autopilot). According to the operating instructions for the airplane's autopilot system, the system's approach mode captures localizer course and glideslope indications when properly configured by the pilot. The system will capture from either above or below the glideslope. No system limitations were published regarding the altitude above the glideslope from which the system would not capture or the rate of descent above which the system would not capture.

A certification engineer for the autopilot manufacturer stated that a descent rate of 1,000 ft per minute (fpm) was "normal" to capture the glideslope from above. The operator's director of operations said that the autopilot in the accident airplane was unlikely to capture the glideslope from above at descent rates greater than 500 fpm.

It could not be determined if the autopilot was in use during the approach, or which operational modes may have been engaged. 



Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Instrument Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KUNV, 1231 ft msl
Observation Time: 0853 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 1 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 240°
Lowest Cloud Condition: 
Temperature/Dew Point: 17°C / 17°C
Lowest Ceiling: Overcast / 300 ft agl
Visibility:  1 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction:  Calm
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.8 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: Moderate - Mist
Departure Point: Washington, PA (AFJ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: State College, PA (UNV)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0745 EDT
Type of Airspace: Class D 

At 0853, the weather recorded at UNV included an overcast ceiling at 300 ft, calm wind, and visibility 1 statute mile in mist. The temperature was 17°C and the dew point was 17°C; the altimeter setting was 29.80 inches of mercury. AIRMET Sierra for instrument meteorological conditions and mountain obscuration was in effect for the area surrounding the accident site at the time of the accident. 



Airport Information

Airport: UNIVERSITY PARK (UNV)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1231 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 24
IFR Approach: ILS
Runway Length/Width: 6701 ft / 150 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: None 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Damage: Destroyed
Passenger Injuries: 1 Fatal
Aircraft Fire: On-Ground
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Fatal
Latitude, Longitude:  40.842778, -77.842500 (est) 

The accident site was about 1 nautical mile (nm) from the threshold of runway 24 and about 2 nm beyond the final radar return at an elevation of 1,200 ft mean sea level. The wreckage was examined at the accident site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene.

The wreckage path was located in densely wooded terrain and extended about 450 ft on a magnetic heading of 223°. The initial impact points were in treetops about 70 ft above the ground, and tree trunks and branches displayed impact fractures and sharp, angular cuts along the length of the wreckage path. Both wings were fragmented along the path. Both engines and each main landing gear were separated and scattered along the wreckage path.

The fuselage and empennage came to rest upright facing the direction of travel. The instrument panel, cockpit, and cabin area were destroyed by postcrash fire.

Control continuity could not be established due to extensive impact damage; however; parts associated with the wings, flaps, and ailerons were identified. Sheet metal and cabling associated with the empennage, horizontal and vertical stabilizers, and the elevators were identified, and the cable attach points at all primary flight controls were secure.

Examination of the landing gear and components associated with the flap system were consistent with a 15° flap extension and the landing gear in the down and locked position at the time of impact.

The propeller systems were attached to their respective engines, and all propeller blades exhibited similar twisting, bending, leading edge gouging, and chordwise scratching. Several tree branches and trunks displayed deep, angular cuts and paint transfers consistent with propeller blade contact.

The engines were each damaged by impact and postcrash fire. The left engine displayed extensive thermal damage. The magnesium oil sump and the accessories mounted to the accessory section were consumed by fire, and the damage and contamination produced by the fire precluded rotation of the engine. The single-drive, dual magneto was consumed by fire and could not be tested. Borescope examination of the cylinders revealed normal operational deposits and wear and no preimpact anomalies.

The right engine displayed extensive thermal damage. Impact damage to the No. 2 cylinder precluded rotation of the engine. The single-drive, dual magneto was damaged by fire and would not produce spark when rotated. Borescope examination of the cylinders revealed normal operational deposits and wear and no evidence of preimpact anomalies. The No. 2 cylinder was removed, and the engine was rotated by hand at the propeller. Continuity was confirmed from the powertrain through the valvetrain to the accessory section. Compression was confirmed on all cylinders using the thumb method, with the exception of the No. 2 cylinder. 



Medical And Pathological Information

Forensic DX, Windber, Pennsylvania, performed an autopsy on the pilot. The reported stated the cause of death was thermal injuries.

The FAA Bioaeronautical Sciences Research Laboratory, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, performed toxicological testing on specimens from the pilot, with negative results for ethanol, carbon monoxide, and all tested-for drugs.

According to FAA records, in 2001 the pilot reported a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) with persistent weakness in his left leg. He received his first special-issuance medical certificate in 2002. A report from the pilot's neurologist dated February 2016 indicated that his neurologic status was unchanged through that date. At his most recent examination for an FAA medical certificate, the pilot reported new diagnoses of diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea, which were managed with diet and the use of bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) treatment, respectively. 



Additional Information

Performance Study

An airplane performance study was conducted based on radar data. As the airplane crossed the precision final approach fix (PFAF), 6.7 nm from the runway threshold, the airplane was 800 ft above the glideslope. As the airplane crossed the PENUE locator outer marker (LOM), 5.5 nm from the runway threshold, the airplane was 500 ft above the glideslope. When radar contact was lost 3.2 nm from the threshold, the airplane was about 250 ft above the glideslope.

At PENUE LOM and at the last radar return, the airplane's position and altitude would have correlated to a full-downward deflection of the glideslope indication in the cockpit.

Interpolation of radar data revealed that, during the last 2 minutes of the accident flight, the airplane's rate of descent increased from 400 fpm to greater than 1,700 fpm. During the final minute of the flight, the rate decreased briefly to 1,000 fpm before radar contact was lost.

Company Standard Operating Procedures (SOP)

According to the operator's SOP, Stabilized Approach, "Flight should be stabilized by 1000 feet HAT [Height Above Touchdown] in IMC [instrument meteorological conditions]…" and further stipulated, "If an unexpected, sustained rate of descent greater than 1000 feet per minute (fpm) is encountered during the approach, a missed approach should be performed."

FAA Information

According to an FAA Safety Team pamphlet, "Stabilized Approach," a stabilized approach is one in which the pilot establishes and maintains a constant angle glidepath towards a predetermined point on the landing runway.

NTSB Identification: ERA16FA215
Nonscheduled 14 CFR Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter
Accident occurred Thursday, June 16, 2016 in State College, PA
Aircraft: PIPER PA31, registration: N3591P
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On June 16, 2016, at 0830 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-31-325, N3591P, was destroyed during collision with terrain while on approach to University Park Airport (UNV), State College, Pennsylvania. The airline transport pilot and passenger were fatally injured. The airplane departed Washington County Airport (AFJ), Washington, Pennsylvania, about 0800. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed for the on-demand air taxi flight, which was conducted under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135.

Preliminary radar and voice communication information from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that at 0824:33, air traffic control (ATC) provided the airplane with a heading to intercept the final approach course for the instrument landing system (ILS) approach to runway 24 at UNV, and cleared the airplane for the approach. At 0824:25, the airplane was advised that radar services were terminated, and was instructed to change radio frequencies and contact the UNV ATC tower.

At 0825, the airplane contacted UNV tower and announced "…with you on the approach." The tower controller acknowledged the call and issued a landing clearance. There were no further communications with the airplane despite multiple attempts by ATC.

At 0843:50, an airport operations ground vehicle operating at the approach end of runway 24 identified smoke in a woodline about 1 mile northeast of the airport, and notified the control tower. The source of the smoke was later identified as the accident site.

The pilot held an airline transport pilot certificate with a rating for airplane single engine land, multiengine land, and instrument airplane. His most recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) first-class medical certificate was issued March 7, 2016. He reported 12,400 total hours of flight experience on that date, 350 hours of which were during the six months previous to that date.

According to FAA and maintenance records, the airplane was manufactured in 1980. Its most recent annual inspection was completed February 19, 2016 at 15,999.6 total aircraft hours.

At 0853, the weather recorded at UNV included an overcast ceiling at 300 feet, calm wind, and visibility 1 statute mile in mist. The temperature was 17 degrees C, and the dew point was 17 degrees C. The altimeter setting was 29.80 inches of mercury. Airmen's Meteorological Information (AIRMET) Sierra for instrument meteorological conditions and mountain obscurations was in effect for the area surrounding the accident site at the time of the accident.

The wreckage was examined at the accident site, and all major components were accounted for at the scene. The wreckage path was in densely wooded terrain, about 450 feet long, and oriented on a magnetic heading of 223 degrees. The initial impact points were in treetops about 70 feet above the ground, and tree trunks and branches displayed impact fractures and sharp, angular cuts along the length of the wreckage path. Both wings were fragmented along the path. Both engines and each main landing gear were separated and scattered prior to the main wreckage.

The fuselage and empennage came to rest upright and facing the direction of travel. The instrument panel, cockpit, and cabin area were completely destroyed by postcrash fire.

Control continuity could not be established due to extensive impact damage; however; parts associated with the wings, flaps, and ailerons were identified. Sheet metal and cabling associated with the empennage, horizontal and vertical stabilizers, as well as the elevators were identified, and the cable attach points at all primary flight controls were secure.

Examination of the landing gear and components associated with the flap system were consistent with a 15-degree flap setting and the gear in the down and locked position.

The propeller systems were attached to their respective engines, and all propeller blades exhibited similar twisting, bending, leading edge gouging, and chordwise scratching. Several tree branches and trunks displayed deep, angular cuts with paint transfers consistent with propeller blade contact.

The engines were each damaged by impact and postcrash fire. The left engine displayed extensive thermal damage. The magnesium oil sump and the accessories mounted to the accessory section were consumed by fire, and the damage and contamination produced by the fire precluded rotation of the engine. The single-drive, dual magneto was consumed by fire and could not be tested. Borescope examination of the cylinders revealed normal operational deposits and wear, and no preimpact anomalies.

The right engine displayed extensive thermal damage. Impact damage to the No. 2 cylinder precluded rotation of the engine. The single-drive, dual magneto was damaged by fire and would not produce spark when rotated. Borescope examination of the cylinders revealed normal operational deposits and wear, and no preimpact anomalies. The No. 2 cylinder was removed, and the engine was rotated by hand at the propeller. Continuity was confirmed from the powertrain through the valvetrain, to the accessory section. Compression was confirmed on all cylinders using the thumb method, with the exception of the No. 2 cylinder.

Accident occurred September 09, 2012 in Washington, Pennsylvania 

Aviation Accident Final Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Investigation Docket - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://dms.ntsb.gov/pubdms

Aviation Accident Data Summary - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Washington, PA
Accident Number: ERA12LA557
Date & Time: 09/09/2012, 0710 EDT
Registration: N3591P
Aircraft: PIPER PA-31-325
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Defining Event: Abrupt maneuver
Injuries: 4 None
Flight Conducted Under:  Part 135: Air Taxi & Commuter - Non-scheduled - Air Medical (Unspecified)

Analysis

Shortly after the airplane lifted off the runway, the pilots observed a flock of geese approaching from the right. The pilot-in-command believed that the birds would impact the cockpit windows, so he pushed forward on the control yoke to descend and avoid such a collision. The airplane struck the runway hard and bounced back into the air. The pilots continued the takeoff and returned to the airport for an uneventful landing. Postaccident examination revealed structural damage to the airframe. Also, bird remains were found on the fuselage.

Probable Cause and Findings

The National Transportation Safety Board determines the probable cause(s) of this accident to be:
The airplane’s encounter with a flock of geese during takeoff, which resulted in the airplane’s hard impact with the runway while the pilot maneuvered in an attempt to avoid the geese.

Findings

Personnel issues
Action - Pilot (Cause)

Environmental issues
Animal(s)/bird(s) - Decision related to condition (Cause)

Factual Information

On September 9, 2012, about 0710 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-31-325, N3591P, was substantially damaged during an abnormal contact with the runway after takeoff from runway 27 at Washington County Airport, Washington, Pennsylvania. The airline transport-rated pilot, co-pilot, and two passengers were not injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Aeronational Incorporated under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 135 as an air medical flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and an instrument flight rules flight plan was filed. The flight was originating at the time of the accident.

The pilot reported that, shortly after lifting off the runway, a flock of geese was approaching from the right side of the airplane. He felt that the birds could have impacted the cockpit windows, so he pushed the yoke forward to avoid a collision. The landing gear contacted the runway "very hard" and the airplane bounced back into the air. Unable to abort the takeoff due insufficient runway remaining, he continued with the takeoff. The pilot remained in the traffic pattern and landed the airplane without further incident.

A Federal Aviation Administration inspector responded to the accident site and examined the airplane. The inspector confirmed substantial damage to the airframe. Bird remains were also found on the fuselage. 

History of Flight

Initial climb
Birdstrike
Abrupt maneuver (Defining event)
Abnormal runway contact 

Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport
Age: 71, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Left
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Seatbelt, Shoulder harness
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification:  Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 08/23/2012
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  20000 hours (Total, all aircraft), 10000 hours (Total, this make and model), 20000 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 175 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 50 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft) 

Co-Pilot Information

Certificate: Airline Transport; Flight Instructor
Age: 40, Male
Airplane Rating(s): Multi-engine Land; Single-engine Land
Seat Occupied: Right
Other Aircraft Rating(s): None
Restraint Used: Seatbelt, Shoulder harness
Instrument Rating(s): Airplane
Second Pilot Present: Yes
Instructor Rating(s): Airplane Multi-engine; Airplane Single-engine; Instrument Airplane
Toxicology Performed: No
Medical Certification: Class 1 With Waivers/Limitations
Last FAA Medical Exam: 05/01/2012
Occupational Pilot: Yes
Last Flight Review or Equivalent:
Flight Time:  3400 hours (Total, all aircraft), 400 hours (Total, this make and model), 3100 hours (Pilot In Command, all aircraft), 60 hours (Last 90 days, all aircraft), 33 hours (Last 30 days, all aircraft)

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N3591P
Model/Series: PA-31-325
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Year of Manufacture:
Amateur Built: No
Airworthiness Certificate: Normal
Serial Number: 31-8012081
Landing Gear Type: Retractable - Tricycle
Seats: 7
Date/Type of Last Inspection: 08/28/2012, Annual
Certified Max Gross Wt.: 6840 lbs
Time Since Last Inspection: 13 Hours
Engines: 2 Reciprocating
Airframe Total Time: 15131 Hours as of last inspection
Engine Manufacturer: LYCOMING
ELT:  Installed, not activated
Engine Model/Series: TIO-540
Registered Owner: AERONATIONAL INC
Rated Power: 310 hp
Operator: AERONATIONAL INC
Operating Certificate(s) Held: On-demand Air Taxi (135) 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: AFJ, 1184 ft msl
Observation Time: 0715 EDT
Distance from Accident Site: 2 Nautical Miles
Direction from Accident Site: 120°
Lowest Cloud Condition: Few / 7000 ft agl
Temperature/Dew Point: 11°C / 11°C
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 3 knots, 220°
Visibility (RVR):
Altimeter Setting: 29.92 inches Hg
Visibility (RVV):
Precipitation and Obscuration: No Obscuration; No Precipitation
Departure Point: Washington, PA (AFJ)
Type of Flight Plan Filed: IFR
Destination: Bangor, ME (BGR)
Type of Clearance: IFR
Departure Time: 0707 EDT
Type of Airspace: 

Airport Information

Airport:  Washington County Airport (AFJ)
Runway Surface Type: Asphalt
Airport Elevation: 1184 ft
Runway Surface Condition: Dry
Runway Used: 27
IFR Approach: None
Runway Length/Width: 5004 ft / 100 ft
VFR Approach/Landing: Full Stop 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 4 None
Latitude, Longitude:  40.136389, -80.290278 (est)

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