Thursday, January 18, 2018

Mooney M20E Super 21 Chaparral, N5562Q, registered to Tangobravo Consulting LLC and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred January 17, 2018 in Skyforest, San Bernardino County, California

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Riverside, California

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Tangobravo Consulting LLC:  http://registry.faa.gov/N5562Q

Location: Skyforest, CA
Accident Number: WPR18LA069
Date & Time: 01/17/2018, 1130 PST
Registration: N5562Q
Aircraft: MOONEY M20E
Injuries: 2 Minor, 2 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On January 17, 2018, about 1130 Pacific standard time, a Mooney M20E, N5562Q, collided with rising terrain near Skyforest, California. The private pilot and one passenger sustained minor injuries; the other two passengers were not injured. The airplane sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and both wings. The airplane was registered to TANGOBRAVO CONSULTING LLC., Redlands, California, and operated by the pilot under the provisions of 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 as a personal flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed. The flight originated from the San Bernardino International Airport (SBD), San Bernardino, California, about 1100 and was destined for Black Bear, California.

The pilot reported that he departed SBD with 20 gallons of fuel onboard. After about 5 minutes into the flight and about 3 miles northwest of SBD, the airplane approached rising terrain that ascended from about 1,800 ft to 5,700 ft over about 5.5 miles. The airplane was about 1,000 feet above the ground (AGL) as it neared the top of the ridgeline. The pilot stated that he encountered a down draft and the airplane aerodynamically stalled. Seconds later, the airplane impacted terrain. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: MOONEY
Registration: N5562Q
Model/Series: M20E NO SERIES
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: KSBD, 1159 ft msl
Observation Time: 1848 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 9 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 23°C / 1°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Scattered / 15000 ft agl
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: Calm
Lowest Ceiling:
Visibility:  7 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.19 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed:  None
Departure Point:  SAN BERNARDINO, CA (SBD)
Destination:

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 Minor
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: 1 Minor, 2 None
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 2 Minor, 2 None
Latitude, Longitude:  34.233333, -117.170556 (est)







DATE/TIME: January 17, 2018 11:30am

INCIDENT: Plane Down 

LOCATION: Sky Park at Santa’s Village 28950 State Hwy 18, Sky Forest, California

SUMMARY: 
On Wednesday, January 17, 2018, at approximately 11:30 am, the Twin Peaks Station and fire personnel were dispatched to Sky Park at Santa’s Village in reference to a plane crash landing in the parking lot. The small, single-engine aircraft left the San Bernardino Airport heading to Big Bear, California with four passengers on board. According to the pilot and occupants of the aircraft, the plane experienced some severe downward drafts shortly after take-off. Unable to gain the proper altitude to return to the airport safely, the pilot made the decision to perform an emergency landing on a dirt berm located in the North/West corner of the Santa’s Village parking lot. 

After landing, all four occupants were able to exit the plane. The pilot and front passenger sustained minor injuries in the crash, while the two rear passengers were unharmed. EMT trained staff from Sky Park quickly rendered medical aid to the injured parties and stabilized them until the fire department arrived on scene. The Running Springs Fire Department transported the two injured parties to a local area hospital. 

Deputy Olivas from the Twin Peaks Station assumed the investigation on behalf of the sheriff’s department. San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Aviation Division also responded to the scene and assisted Deputy Olivas with the investigation. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the Federal Aviation Administration were notified of the incident and will be conducting an investigation. 

If you have additional information about the crash, please contact Deputy Olivas at the Twin Peaks Station 909-336-0600. 

Refer:  Public Information Officer Gil Flores or Deputy Olivas

Station: Twin Peaks Station 

Case #: 051800094 

Phone No. 909-336-0600 

JOHN McMAHON, Sheriff-Coroner 

San Bernardino County Sheriff-Coroner Department










A single-engine aircraft crashed in the parking lot of Sky Park at Santa’s Village Wednesday morning.

All four people aboard were able to exit the plane, the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department reported. The rear passengers were unharmed.

The plane left San Bernardino Airport heading to Big Bear Valley.

According to the pilot and occupants of the aircraft, the plane experienced some severe downward drafts shortly after take-off. Unable to gain the proper altitude to return to the airport safely, the pilot made the decision to perform an emergency landing on a dirt berm located in the northwest corner of the Santa’s Village parking lot in Sky Forest off Highway 18.

EMT trained staff from Sky Park quickly rendered medical aid to the injured people and stabilized them until the Running Springs Fire Department arrived and took them to a local area hospital.

Deputy Olivas from the Twin Peaks Station assumed the investigation on behalf of the Sheriff’s Department. San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Aviation Division also responded to the scene and assisted Deputy Olivas with the investigation. The National Transportation Safety Board and the Federal Aviation Administration were notified of the incident and will be conducting an investigation.

If you have additional information about the crash, please contact Deputy Olivas at the Twin Peaks Station (909) 336-0600.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.highlandnews.net



A small plane carrying four people crashed Wednesday morning in the parking lot of Santa’s Village in Skyforest, the San Bernardino County Fire Department said.

The plane, which the Federal Aviation Association registry identifies as a Mooney M20E, crashed about 11:30 a.m., fire department spokesman Eric Sherwin said. All four people — a pilot and three passengers — walked away with minor to moderate injuries.

The plane made a “hard emergency landing for unknown reasons,” said Ian Gregor, FAA Public Affairs manager.

The FAA registry lists the plane’s owner as Tangobravo Consulting LLC, of Redlands.

Santa’s Village employee Auguste Seja said he saw glimpses of the plane before the crash.

Then “I heard a really loud terrible noise in the parking lot and I ran out here and saw a plane on its belly,” he said.

Story, video and photos ➤ https://www.redlandsdailyfacts.com

5 comments:

Anonymous said...



Translation; Overweight and aft of CG, the airplane was unable to gain altitude or return to the airport so the pilot made a forced landing in a parking lot.

Anonymous said...

If that's what happened, still better to crash land in a controlled manner than to try to turn back to the airport only to stall & spin in. How he managed to get it down in one piece with all those obstacles around is a miracle.

Anonymous said...

I have flown around that area for more than 30 years. He was next to sheer mountains. All he had to do was point the nose south and he'd have 3k feet of air underneath himself. Something is fishy about the story..

Anonymous said...

It takes instinct and training to navigate that landing.
Kudos to the captain.

Anonymous said...

I fly these mountains with helicopter and fixed wing every week. I actually flew these mountains on the same day of the accident. And along the same route. The wind is always tricky. You need to gain a lot of altitude AGL before trying to cross over the berms. This weekend I flew the same routes again. It had even trickier winds this weekend. Doing a 180 back to KSBD would have had much better consequences. It is apparent that this pilot does not have mountain flying skills and has very poor judgement.