Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Cirrus SR22T, N325JK, Abide Aviation LLC

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov


Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Aircraft off course and not descending to assigned altitude. Military intercept made over Gulf of Mexico. Aircraft not responding to fighter intercept.

Abide Aviation LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N325JK

Date: 03-JAN-18

Time: 15:48:00Z
Regis#: N325JK
Aircraft Make: CIRRUS
Aircraft Model: SR22T
Event Type: INCIDENT
Highest Injury: UNKNOWN
Aircraft Missing: Yes
Damage: UNKNOWN
Activity: UNKNOWN
Flight Phase: EN ROUTE (ENR)
Operation: 91
City: OKLAHOMA CITY
State: OKLAHOMA



OKLAHOMA CITY (KOKH) — The son of a missing animal rescue pilot is raising funds to search for his father's wreckage.

Dr. Bill Kinsinger was last seen Jan. 3 in his Cirrus SR22T over the Gulf of Mexico. He went missing while flying to the Austin-area as part of his work with the Pilots N Paws animal rescue. A military plane was sent to investigate Kinsinger's Cirrus SR22T in the air and found the pilot slumped over, unresponsive. The plane later lost sight of Kinsinger's Cirrus SR22T.

The US Coast Guard searched for 79 hours for the wreckage of Kinsinger's Cirrus SR22T, but called off the search Jan. 8.

Kinsinger's son, Jake, is attempting to raise $100,000 to hire a sailboat and drag a sonar in the area where Kinsinger's wreckage is believed to be.

"I would start at my dad's favorite place in the world, Key West, and journey to Cancun. Make base and go out everyday when it was clear and pull that sonar," Jacob said.

He's raised more than $4,000 so far, but still has a long way to go. He describes his dad a go-getter, who never gave up. Jacob said it's something that's installed in him.

"I know in my heart, my dad never, ever would have stopped looking for me, " Jacob said. "I'm giving it all I got. He's there somewhere."

He goes on to say his dad saved a lot of lives, inside the hospital and out, rescuing dogs who needed a forever home.

"My dad, Bill Kinsinger, was one of the most exceptional men that has ever been put on this earth impacting every single person he came across in a positive way. His love for animals was a passion like no other I have ever seen. He spent nearly every second of his free time and money out of his own pocket flying shelter dogs wherever they needed to go for safety," Jake wrote in the fundraising post.

You can find the fundraiser here.

Kinsinger was the medical director of obstetric anesthesia at INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center. 

http://okcfox.com


Pictured, from left, Dr. Bill Kinsinger (Image/Masaru's Rescue Facebook page), Masaru, the rescue dog Kinsinger was supposed to pick up before he and his plane went missing.


The Coast Guard ended its search over the Gulf of Mexico on Monday for a missing Oklahoma pilot who was flying to Georgetown to pick up a rescue dog.

Bill Kinsinger, a 55-year-old volunteer pilot for the Pilots N Paws rescue group, left from the Wiley Post Airport in Oklahoma City, where he is from, on Wednesday evening, officials said. His Cirrus SR22 airplane disappeared above the Gulf sometime between Wednesday evening and Thursday morning.

The search lasted 79 hours, Coast Guard officials said.  

“Ending a search is a difficult decision that we put the utmost thought and consideration into,” said Capt. David Cooper, the Coast Guard’s district chief of incident management. “Dr. Kinsinger was a well-loved man, and our hearts go out to everyone impacted during this tragic time.” 

After Kinsinger stopped responding to air traffic controllers, a defense command in Houston launched two aircraft to find the pilot, said officials with the North American Aerospace Defense Command.

The fighters flew in front of Kinsinger’s plane and dropped flares, but Kinsinger appeared to be unresponsive at the time, officials said.

The aircraft eventually left Kinsinger’s plane because of darkness and their proximity to Mexican air space, officials said. The Coast Guard, which was relying on the FlightAware website to monitor the plane, lost track of the plane when it stopped transmitting a signal.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://www.statesman.com

Volunteers with Pilots N Paws flew a disabled dog from Texas to Oklahoma after the mission's original pilot went missing.



OKLAHOMA CITY (KOKH) - While the search continues for a missing pilot from Edmond, Oklahoma, his colleagues made a rescue flight in his honor Thursday night.

Dr. Bill Kinsinger left the Wiley Post Airport Wednesday for Texas. He had planned to reach the Austin area to rescue a disabled dog, but his Cirrus SR22T was last seen heading into the Gulf of Mexico.

Thursday, fellow volunteers with Pilots N Paws brought that dog to Oklahoma. They say even though Kinsinger is missing, he would have wanted this trip to happen.

"Whatever happened to Bill, you know, he did it for this dog out of the goodness of his heart, for the right reasons,” said pilot Justin Blackburn. “So, it would be, you know, be kind of sad for me to not have that completed."

The pilots brought the senior husky, which has no use of his back legs, to his temporary foster family in Oklahoma. The dog will ultimately head to a rescue in Las Vegas, where he can get the medical care he needs.

Kinsinger has been volunteering with Pilots N Paws since 2014.

“Bill was such a phenomenal pilot for Pilots N Paws,” said Kelly Rosson, a volunteer with the organization. “There was one flight the girls booked and he had five dogs on one flight, and he didn’t back down. He took on that responsibility and got them to their final destinations, their forever homes.”

His fellow volunteers are hopeful the pilot will be found alive.

Story and video ➤ http://okcfox.com

Dr. Bill Kinsinger


What is hypoxia?

HOUSTON — A doctor volunteering for a dog rescue operation who failed to land his small plane in Central Texas as planned and was later tracked by fighter jets flying over the Gulf of Mexico appeared unresponsive and may have been suffering from a lack of oxygen, officials said Thursday.

The condition is known as hypoxia.

WHAT IS HYPOXIA?

Hypoxia is the condition that occurs when someone’s brain is deprived of adequate oxygen. If untreated, it can be fatal.

Oxygen pressure decreases as altitude increases. It’s the reason planes are pressurized, mountaineers carry supplemental oxygen on high-altitude climbs, or climbers and athletes train at higher altitudes to become acclimated to the lower oxygen pressure. It’s also the reason flight attendants explain to aircraft passengers the use of oxygen masks that will drop from overhead compartments in the unlikely event cabin pressure is lost during a flight.

Providing adequate oxygen resolves hypoxia.

THE EFFECTS OF HYPOXIA

“Thinking becomes cloudy, a person can become confused, lethargic, fatigued,” according to Dr. Zeenat Safdar, a pulmonologist and director of the Houston Methodist Hospital Pulmonary Hypertension Program at the hospital’s lung center.

The person becomes discolored and dies.

“Before that, a lot of confusion,” Safdar said. “They wouldn’t know where they’re going, what’s up and what’s down. The sense of direction may be clouded.”

It also depends on where they are. At a lower altitude, it can be a gradual process.

“They want to sleep, might have a seizure, become short of breath or can’t breathe … He might not even know what’s happening.

“With a small plane, maybe their own plane, they don’t realize what’s happening,” Safdar said. “These things are very unfortunate.

“If it starts to happen, and if you get oxygen right away, you’ll recover right away. It depends on how rapidly it happens. If you go from pressurized cabin at 30,000 feet … and now the plane loses pressure, in few minutes the person is going to start noticing. If they’re not that high up, like in a small aircraft, the effect going to be more slow and more subtle and may be even missed,” Safdar said.

HYPOXIA AT SEA LEVEL

Safdar said hypoxia is not limited to people at high altitudes.

People suffering from emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, lung damage and the effects of pneumonia all can be described as dealing with hypoxia.

“See people walking around with oxygen tanks?” she asked. “The need for oxygen. We are treating hypoxia all the time.”

NOTABLE HYPOXIA DEATHS

—In 1999, a charter jet crash killed pro golfer Payne Stewart and four others and flew halfway across the country on autopilot before crashing in a pasture in South Dakota. Everyone on board had apparently lost consciousness for lack of oxygen after a loss of cabin pressure and investigators said the plane crashed after it ran out of fuel.

—Among multiple theories in the 2014 disappearance of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 carrying 239 passengers and crew is a slow or sudden decompression, causing a loss of oxygen, could have killed everyone on board. If oxygen levels dropped, a loud, automated warning would have alerted the pilots to put on their oxygen masks and immediately descend below 10,000 feet, where there is enough oxygen to breathe without aid. But aviation experts said in that case the plane should have kept flying automatically toward Beijing and been visible on radar.

—Greek investigators said pilots on a Cypriot airliner did not realize an automatic pressurization system was set to “manual” when in 2005 a loss of cabin pressure and oxygen led to hypoxia and the plane’s crash in Greece, killing all 121 people on board.

Hypoxia altitude and oxygen 


OKLAHOMA CITY (KOKH) — The search continues for a missing plane from Wiley Post Airport.

The Cirrus SR22T, piloted by Dr. Bill Kinsinger, was last seen Wednesday headed into the Gulf of Mexico. Kinsinger was on his way to the Austin-area to pick up homeless pets.

Kinsinger's associate at Pilots N Paws rescue Kelly Rosson says the ultimate outcome doesn't look good but she's keeping a positive outlook. She hopes that Kinsinger is still alive and says he was doing what he loves: rescuing dogs and giving them a new home. By day Kinsinger was an anesthesiologist, but by night he rescued dogs from kill shelters across the country.

"He has flown many pets here to me to foster for one night. For several nights. I think the most that he's ever done was five in one flight," Rosson said.

Just after 2:15 p.m. Jan. 3 Kinsinger left from Wiley Post Airport for a pickup from Georgetown, Texas. He planned to drop the dog off in Las Vegas. Rosson says that for every flight all of the pilots keep in contact with each other, letting them know when they are going to take off.

Through a group chat, everyone was able to see Kinsinger go off radar.

"Bill had communicated that he was just about to be wheels up at Wiley Post at 2:16 and at 2:19 he actually took off," Rosson said.

He was supposed to land in Georgetown at 6:19 p.m. but lost communication about 30 minutes before his scheduled landing.

"When he said he was going to be somewhere at 3:30, at 3:29 he arrived. So, it was not like him to not be on time," Rosson said.

A military plane was sent to investigate Kinsinger's plane in the air and found the pilot slumped over, unresponsive. The plane later lost sight of Kinsinger's aircraft.

"I'm still hopeful that Bill can be found," Rosson said.

The FAA says the Coast Guard deployed a plane from Clearwater, Florida to aid in the search and is searching for the plane approximately 118 nautical miles north of the Yucatan Peninsula.

Kinsinger is the medical director of obstetric anesthesia at INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center.


Story and video ➤ http://ktul.com

Dr. Bill Kinsinger


A doctor volunteering for a dog rescue operation who failed to land his Cirrus SR22T at an airport in Central Texas as planned and was later tracked by fighter jets flying over the Gulf of Mexico appeared unresponsive and may have been suffering from a lack of oxygen, officials said Thursday.

The Coast Guard identified the pilot of the Cirrus SR22T as Dr. Bill Kinsinger, who took off from Wiley Post Airport in Oklahoma City on Wednesday after filing a flight plan to land in Georgetown, Texas, about 25 miles (40 kilometers) north of Austin.

It's unclear why the Cirrus SR22T never landed in Georgetown. 

Federal Aviation Administration spokesman Lynn Lunsford said the Cirrus SR22T kept flying and was last observed on radar 219 miles (352 kilometers) northwest of Cancun, Mexico, flying at 15,000 feet (4,600 meters).

Coast Guard spokeswoman Lexie Preston in New Orleans said Thursday that Coast Guard aircraft are searching for the Cirrus SR22T in a broad area off the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico.

After Kinsinger stopped responding to air traffic controllers, the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or NORAD, launched two F-16 fighters from a base in Houston and made contact with the plane, NORAD spokesman Michael Kucharek said. The fighters flew in front of the Cirrus SR22T, dropped flares and performed other military maneuvers in an effort to gain the pilot's attention, but Kinsinger, who was the only person onboard, appeared to be unresponsive, he said.

The F-16s became low on fuel and were replaced by two F-15 fighters from New Orleans. The F-15s stayed with the plane for a time but later returned to base because of darkness and their proximity to Mexican airspace. Kucharek said NORAD coordinated with the Coast Guard to take over monitoring the Cirrus SR22T. The Guard, which was relying on the FlightAware website, lost track of the Cirrus SR22T when it stopped transmitting a signal, Coast Guard Petty Officer Travis McGee said.

"We didn't deem the Cirrus SR22T to be a threat and that's normally what we're looking for," Kucharek said.

The Eighth Coast Guard District, referencing a NORAD report, said Kinsinger appeared to be suffering from hypoxia, in which the brain is deprived of adequate oxygen. The condition can cause confusion, nausea, breathlessness and hallucinations. If left untreated, it can be fatal.

According to Federal Aviation Administration regulations, a civil aircraft pilot flying solo must use supplemental oxygen if flying for longer than 30 minutes above 12,500 feet (3,800 meters), and for an entire flight if flying above 14,000 feet (4,300 meters).

The executive director of the Oklahoma Medical Board, Lyle Kelsey, said Kinsinger is an anesthesiologist who serves on the board and lives in Edmond, Oklahoma. Federal Aviation Administration records show the Cirrus SR22T belongs to Abide Aviation, which is registered to Kinsinger's home address.

Kinsinger was flying a rescue mission for the nonprofit Pilots N Paws when his Cirrus SR22T went missing, according to flight coordinator Monica Marshall, who said she was tracking his progress when radar indicated he had veered hundreds of miles off course. Pilots N Paws has a fleet of volunteer pilots with private planes who transport dogs in need of rescue, shelter or a new home.

"He was the type of guy that went above and beyond," Marshall said. "If someone bailed on an assignment then he would just stretch and do it for you."

A message left for a brother of Kinsinger was not immediately returned.

This is not the first recorded instance of a pilot losing consciousness due to a lack of oxygen.

The National Transportation Safety Board determined that a pilot suffered from hypoxia while flying golfer Payne Stewart and three others on a private plane from Florida to Texas in 1999. The plane veered off course and later crashed in South Dakota, killing them all.

Original article can be found here ➤  http://abcnews.go.com

Dr. Bill Kinsinger


FREEPORT, Texas – The Coast Guard continues to search for a missing Cirrus SR22T that disappeared over the Gulf of Mexico on Wednesday.

The FAA confirms the Cirrus SR22T left Oklahoma City's Wiley Post Airport on Wednesday afternoon and filed a flight plan to Georgetown, TX.  However, officials say the pilot did not land in Georgetown and continued on the same course.

When air traffic controllers tried to contact the pilot, he was unresponsive. FAA officials say the plane was last seen on radar about 219 miles northwest of Cancun at 15,000 feet and was headed into the Gulf of Mexico.

A short time later, the Coast Guard received word of a possible plane crash in the Gulf of Mexico due to an unresponsive pilot.

“We are getting ready to send out an aircraft to search the waters off Freeport, TX (due south of Houston right on the Gulf). Our report shows 150 nautical miles off Freeport,” the Coast Guard said on Wednesday.

Although the pilot has not officially been identified, family members confirmed to KFOR that the pilot is Bill Kinsinger.

Kinsinger's family tells KFOR that they are still receiving updates from the Coast Guard, and are hopeful that he will be found alive.

"We ask that you keep our Women's Center, Labor and Delivery Unit and entire Anesthesiology Team; as well as our colleagues at Northwest Anesthesia PC in your thoughts and prayers. Dr. John William Kinsinger, who goes by Bill, is a longtime employee and friend. He is the current medical director of obstetric anesthesia at INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center. He is also President of the Oklahoma Board of Medical Licensure and Supervision. He was piloting his plane yesterday evening in route to Texas to pick-up some rescue dogs in need of help, when his plane mysteriously veered off course. When he did not respond to air traffic control communication attempts, a military plane was sent to investigate. The military crew made visual contact of Kinsinger's plane and determined he was unresponsive. His plane eventually went down in the Gulf of Mexico. The Coast Guard is currently searching the area. While we do not know many details at this time or the ultimate outcome, we thought it necessary and important to share with you the facts that we have been given," said INTEGRIS Health.

An organization on social media says Kinsinger was on his way to pick up a senior husky in need of medical care.

"We have some unfortunate news to share with you. Masaru was scheduled to be picked up by a Pilots N Paws pilot named Bill to transport him to Oklahoma City. However, Bill's plane was diverted off course southeast of Houston. It's been over six hours since we've last had contact with the plane. Currently, the Coast Guard is on the look-out. And just to clarify, Masaru was not on the plane and is safe with his foster in Texas. This news has devastated all of us. But for Masaru's sake we're doing our best to stay strong. With your help, we'd like to start a prayer chain to surround all of Masaru's heroes with love and positive energy, especially Bill and his family," a post on Facebook read.

"We at White Paws ask that you join us in prayer for Bill Kinsinger, a pilot for Pilots N Paws, and his family. Bill was on a rescue flight and it appears there was a tragic in flight issue. Coast Guard is searching for his plane currently. Please pray for him and his family. He was doing what he loved," a post by White Paws German Shepherd Rescue read.

Officials say that Mexican authorities, the U.S. Coast Guard and the State Department are now in charge of the investigation.

Story, video and photos ➤   http://kfor.com

Dr. Bill Kinsinger


GULF OF MEXICO - The Federal Aviation Administration says a Cirrus SR22T lost out of Oklahoma City was last tracked in the Gulf of Mexico; U.S. Coast Guard confirms it has sent out aircraft to do a search 150 nautical miles off the coast.

Authorities confirmed on Thursday that the pilot's name is Bill Kisinger.

The Coast Guard received a report of an unresponsive pilot from the Cirrus SR22T, which had a tail number of N325JK. 

The Cirrus SR22T was scheduled to arrive at Georgetown Municipal Airport earlier Wednesday after taking off from Oklahoma City's Wiley Post Airport at 2:19 p.m.

The Coast Guard said it is searching due south of the gulf coast town of Freeport, Texas, which is an hour south of Houston.

The Federal Aviation Administration reports that the Cirrus SR22T left Wiley Post on Wednesday afternoon and the pilot filed a flight plan to Georgetown, Texas. 

The pilot did not land in Georgetown, however, but continued on the same course. 

The pilot was unresponsive to traffic control instructions at this point, the Federal Aviation Administration said.

The lost Cirrus SR22T was last observed on radar about 219 miles northwest of Cancun at 15,000 feet and heading into the Gulf of Mexico, according to the Federal Aviation Administration report.

The Cirrus SR22T is registered to Abide Aviation LLC out of Edmond.

On Thursday afternoon, North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) confirmed to 2 Works For You that fighter aircraft were scrambled from Ellington Field, Texas in response to a small general aviation aircraft (Cirrus SR22T). Officials confirm that the Cirrus SR22T wasn't responsive to Federal Aviation Administration emergency radio contact attempts. 

An H-C 130 Hercules jet out of Clearwater, Florida is currently searching. 

Crews are swapping out for fatigue and fuel. 

Officials say they cannot confirm the cause at this time. They say they believe that the pilot was flying at high altitudes, which can cause hypoxia. 

Story, video and photos ➤ https://www.kjrh.com

Dr. Bill Kinsinger 




HOUSTON -- U.S. Coast Guard officials are trying to locate a Cirrus SR22T they say went missing Wednesday while en route to Texas.

Officials say the Cirrus SR22T took off from Oklahoma City Wednesday and was headed to Georgetown Municipal Airport, north of Austin, but diverted at some point and headed south.

U.S. Coast Guard officials say they lost contact with the pilot after the Cirrus SR22T flew past Freeport. 

The Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base in New Orleans sent a plane into the Gulf to try and make contact with the pilot where they observed him slouched over in the cockpit.

Officials believe he was the only person onboard the Cirrus SR22T, and the pilot was unresponsive likely due to hypoxia.

A search is now underway for where the aircraft likely went down.

Story and video ➤ http://www.khou.com

Dr. Bill Kinsinger

OKLAHOMA CITY (KOKH) - The U.S. Coast Guard is continuing the search for a Cirrus SR22T that went missing after leaving a metro airport.

U.S. Coast Guard officials tell FOX 25 that Bill Kinsinger is the pilot of the Cirrus SR22T that left Wiley Post Airport Wednesday afternoon with a flight plan to Georgetown Municipal Airport (GTU) in Texas.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the Cirrus SR22T veered off course ahead of its approach to Georgetown and headed out into the Gulf of Mexico. 

The Cirrus SR22T was last observed on radar around 5:15 p.m. Wednesday about 219 miles northwest of Cancun at 15,000 feet and was headed into the Gulf of Mexico.

The U.S. Coast Guard has deployed a plane from Clearwater, Florida, to aid in the search.

CBS Austin reports that the U.S. Coast Guard is searching for the Cirrus SR22T approximately 118 nautical miles north of the Yucatan Peninsula.

The airplane is registered by Abide Aviation LLC in Edmond.

Story and photo ➤ http://okcfox.com




BETHANY, Okla. —  The U.S. Coast Guard is searching for a Cirrus SR22T that took off from Wiley Post Airport in Bethany, officials confirmed.

Crews are searching for a Cirrus SR22T with the tail number N325JK, but have not found anything yet. 

Online records show that the Cirrus SR22T took off shortly before 2:20 p.m. Wednesday from Wiley Port Airport and was expected to arrive at 6:12 p.m. at Georgetown Municipal Airport near Austin, Texas.

The Cirrus SR22T veered from its flight path near Waco, Texas.

Records show that the Cirrus SR22T is registered to the Edmond-based company Abide Aviation LLC.

Officials with the Federal Aviation Administration said that the pilot of a Cirrus SR22T filed a flight plan to Georgetown, Texas. 

The Cirrus SR22T did not land and continued on the same course and was unresponsive to air traffic control instructions.

The Cirrus SR22T was last observed on radar about 219 miles northwest of Cancun at 15,000 feet and was headed into the Gulf of Mexico.

Multiple sources have told KOCO 5 that the pilot, identified by social media posts as Bill Kinsinger, was heading to Texas as part of an animal-rescue charity.

Story and video ➤ http://www.koco.com





FREEPORT, Texas (KTRK) -- The U.S. Coast Guard is searching for a Cirrus SR22T off the coast of Freeport after its pilot stopped responding to air traffic control.

The USCG told Eyewitness News the pilot took off from Wiley Post Airport in Oklahoma City Wednesday afternoon. 

The pilot had filed a flight plan to Georgetown, Texas, but failed to land there.

When air traffic controllers tried making contact with the pilot, investigators said controllers received no response and the plane continued on the same course. It's believed the pilot likely suffered from hypoxia, a lack of oxygen.

The pilot and the Cirrus SR22T was last observed on radar about 219 miles northwest of Cancun at 15,000 feet, and was heading into the Gulf of Mexico.

Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base New Orleans launched aircraft to investigate and reported the pilot was slouched over and appeared unconscious.  

The Coast Guard is using a C-130 aircraft in its search for the missing pilot and the Cirrus SR22T.

Story and video ➤ http://abc13.com

OKLAHOMA CITY, Okla. - A Cirrus SR22T that took off from the Wiley Post Airport in Oklahoma City is missing.

The Cirrus SR22T was supposed to land in Georgetown, Texas, but radar data shows that it kept going and flew south over the Gulf of Mexico.


The Coast Guard said they are searching for the last point of contact to confirm whether or not the Cirrus SR22T is lost. 


North American Aerospace Defense Command helped in the search, sending four F-16 fighter jets to search. 


They found the Cirrus SR22T, but could not get the pilot to respond. 


The pilots of the fighter jets said they could only see one person on board- the pilot. 


Mexican authorities,  the US Coast Guard and the State Department are now in charge of the investigation. 


The Cirrus SR22T is registered to Abide Aviation LLC out of Edmond.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.fox23.com

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

From the looks of FlightAware he was on autopilot cruising at 19,000' and suffered a medical emergency or had a problem with his oxygen system and kept on flying until out of fuel over the Gulf.

Anonymous said...

To the experts:

1. Is it necessary or advisable to fly at such (seemingly) high altitude (19,000 ft)? I don't know the Cirrus's limitations but 19,000 ft seems high for a small aircraft.

2. If the jet pilot(s) saw him slouching over (the controls, I presume), would there have been a reason why the pilot(s) did not "stay with him" until a final outcome?

Thanks.

Richard Turner said...

<1. Is it necessary or advisable to fly at such (seemingly) high altitude (19,000 ft)? I don't know the Cirrus's limitations but 19,000 ft seems high for a small aircraft.>

The SR22T is turbocharged, giving the engine high pressure air even at higher altitudes. Flying higher results in a higher true airspeed with the same fuel flow. It is also better in some weather conditions.

<2. If the jet pilot(s) saw him slouching over (the controls, I presume), would there have been a reason why the pilot(s) did not "stay with him" until a final outcome?>

Have to speculate the F-16's hit "bingo" fuel, just enough to return plus reserves, before the Cirrus ran dry and before the C-130 had time to arrive.

Anonymous said...

Isn't a 2016 Cirrus SR22T equipped with Automatic Descent when the pilot is not responsive, or was that not available until the 2017 model?