Friday, July 14, 2017

Piper PA-44-180 Seminole, N2173S, registered to and operated by Sunrise Aviation Inc: Fatal accident occurred July 13, 2017 in Marineland, Florida

The National Transportation Safety Board traveled to the scene of this accident. 

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Orlando, Florida

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf


Sunrise Aviation Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N2173S 

NTSB Identification: WPR17FA151
14 CFR Part 91: General Aviation
Accident occurred Thursday, July 13, 2017 in Marineland, FL
Aircraft: PIPER PA 44-180, registration: N2173S
Injuries: 2 Fatal.

This is preliminary information, subject to change, and may contain errors. Any errors in this report will be corrected when the final report has been completed. NTSB investigators either traveled in support of this investigation or conducted a significant amount of investigative work without any travel, and used data obtained from various sources to prepare this aircraft accident report.

On July 13, 2017, about 2300 eastern daylight time, a Piper PA-44-180, N2173S, was destroyed during a descent and subsequent inflight breakup near Marineland, Florida. The flight instructor and private pilot receiving instruction were fatally injured. The airplane was registered to and operated by Sunrise Aviation Inc., Ormond Beach, Florida, as a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 instructional flight. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed and no flight plan was filed for the cross-country flight which originated from Brunswick, Georgia, at an undetermined time with an intended destination of the Ormond Beach Municipal Airport (OMN), Ormond, Florida.

Information provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) revealed that the flight reported to Air Traffic Control that they had OMN in sight while at an altitude of about 5,400 feet mean sea level (MSL). Shortly after, radar and radio communication was lost with the accident airplane. The FAA issued an alert notice (ALNOT) shortly after. The main wreckage was located by air units about 1141 on July 14, 2017.

The main wreckage came to rest inverted within a heavily wooded area. The outboard portions of the left and right wings, baggage door, and a portion of the right stabilator were located throughout a 0.5-mile-long and 0.2-mile-wide debris path that spanned across water and marshland northwest of the main wreckage.

The located wreckage was recovered to a secure location for further examination.

Those who may have information that might be relevant to the National Transportation Safety Board investigation may contact them by email eyewitnessreport@ntsb.gov, and any friends and family who want to contact investigators about the accident should email assistance@ntsb.gov



Jeffrey Matthew Salan 

August 29, 1946 - July 13, 2017




Muhammad Al-Anzi



Jeff Salan's Final Expenses

On the evening of July 13, 2017, our father and husband, Jeff Salan, was tragically killed in a plane crash. Jeff had been a pilot and instructor for more than half of his 70 years of life, and he loved every minute of it. He loved his career and his students, and there are hundreds, if not thousands, of pilots, both active and retired, who will tell you that they are alive today because of the skills and knowledge that they learned at Jeff Salan's side.

Jeff could have focused his career on making money, flying big jets and seeing the world, however, he chose to be home each day and do the one job he took even more pride in than teaching: being a father and husband.
Jeff has been married to his loving wife, Jane, for 40 years, and they raised two dutiful and family-oriented children. As the sole-earner in the household, Jeff worked nearly every day of the year to provide for his family. 

This loss has nearly broken us. We say nearly because he instilled in us his refusal to break or bend, even when times were at their worst. And times are certainly at their worst for our family.

The cost of burying our father, our husband, is insurmountable at this time without help. We do not cremate our family members, and we want to keep Jeff close to us and the place we have called home for the last 37 years.

The financial goal set for this fundraiser is an estimated cost for an in-ground burial at a cemetery near our home. An anonymous donor has now offered to cover those expenses, so the money raised will be used for associated costs and final expenses. We ask that you be generous, if you can, just as Jeff was generous towards his students, his coworkers, and his family. It may normally be a cliche, but Jeff Salan truly was the man who would give you the shirt off of his back without a second thought.

The Salan family thanks you in advance for all the help you may provide us in our time of need.

https://www.gofundme.com



FLAGLER COUNTY, Fla. - Jeffrey Salan, 70, of Ormond Beach, and Mohammed Alanazi, 27, from Saudi Arabia, died when a twin-engine plane from an Ormond Beach flight school went down late Thursday night, the medical examiner confirmed.

After hours of searching near the Flagler-St. Johns county line, the Piper PA44 was found Friday upside down in a clump of trees near Pellicer Creek, just west of Marineland. Flagler County Sheriff Rick Staly said one body was found with the wreckage and there did not appear to be any survivors.

Salan was a flight instructor for Sunrise Aviation Fight School. A spokesman for the school said they were on a routine night training flight.

"The families of the student, all of whom are in Saudi Arabia, and the family of our local instructor are all distraught, as you can imagine," said Patrick Murphy, director of training for Sunrise Aviation.

A GoFundMe account has been set up to help Salan's family with funeral expenses. 

"Jeff could have focused his career on making money, flying big jets and seeing the world, however, he chose to be home each day and do the one job he took even more pride in than teaching: being a father and husband," the GoFundMe page reads. "Jeff has been married to his loving wife, Jane, for 40 years, and they raised two dutiful and family-oriented children. As the sole-earner in the household, Jeff worked nearly every day of the year to provide for his family. This loss has nearly broken us. We say nearly because he instilled in us his refusal to break or bend, even when times were at their worst. And times are certainly at their worst for our family."

The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the crash. They have not provided any indication of what might have caused the plane to go down.


https://www.news4jax.com




Jeddah — A Saudi commercial pilot under instruction was killed in a twin-engine plane crash in the River To Sea Preserve near the St. Johns County line on Thursday, National Transportation Safety Board Investigator Joshua Cawthra confirmed to the local media.

Muhammad Al-Anzi, 27, who died along with his 70-year-old flight instructor, is to be buried in Riyadh.

Al-Anzi, married with a 3-year-old daughter, had gone to the US in 2014 to obtain a commercial flight pilot license.

The “mangled” aircraft was found shortly before noon Friday after about a 12-hour search, according to Flagler County Sheriff Rick Staly.

Investigators collected debris from the plane wreckage scattered across a marshy area near the Matanzas River in eastern Flagler County, reported the Daytona Beach News Journal.

Cawthra said that the cause of the crash is still under investigation, and that a preliminary report will be released within a week or so.

Authorities previously confirmed that the downed plane belonged to Sunrise Aviation, a private flight school in Ormond Beach.

Federal Aviation Administration reports indicate the flight was bound for Ormond Beach from Brunswick, Georgia, when radar contact was lost about 22 miles north of Ormond Beach just after 11 p.m. Thursday.


http://saudigazette.com.sa

National Transportation Safety Board Investigator Joshua Cawthra









A 12-hour search by land, water and air ended just before noon Friday when a Piper PA-44 Seminole trainer aircraft sought since the FAA first reported losing contact with it Thursday night was found upside-down in dense brush near Marineland and the Flagler/ St. Johns County line.

Crushed and cracked in half according to images just released by the Flagler County Sheriff’s Office, it appears those on board are dead, according to Sheriff Rick Staly.

The white airplane had been the subject of a search by multiple state, federal and local agencies since the FAA lost contact with it around 11 p.m. Thursday, Staly said.

The plane was being operated by Sunrise Flight Academy in Ormond Beach, and its training director confirmed a student from Saudi Arabia and an instructor are both missing, according to First Coast News.

The FAA said that it lost contact with the Piper PA-44 aircraft approximately 22 miles north of Ormond Beach. The Coast Guard said it went down in the vicinity of Pellicer Creek, after taking off from Brunswick and heading to Ormond Beach. Witnesses heard what they described as the sound of an engine sputtering as the aircraft flew by, according to First Coast News.


Just after 11:30 a.m., the main part of the aircraft was discovered by a news helicopter from Orlando’s WESH-TV, crashed in the 90-acre River to Sea Preserve, which straddles both sides of Florida and is owned jointly by Flagler County and the Town of Marineland.

Staly said he had been to the wreck site and it appears that the aircraft clipped a tree and flipped over. Only one victim’s body was visible when he joined investigators there Friday morning, one of its landing gear deployed on the flattened wreckage surrounded by dense palmettos, according to Sheriff’s Office photos.

“It is a very tragic ending to a search. You always hope you can find people alive. There is no indication we will find survivors,” Staly said. “… I can see one [body]. It is a very crumpled aircraft, and by how it’s lying, you can’t see into the fuselage.”

The 34-year-old flight school, which also calls itself Sunrise Aviation, is based at 740 Airport Road in Ormond Beach. Sunrise is also a flight training provider for Florida State College at Jacksonville’s degree programs in professional pilot technology, as well as at Polk State College at Lakeland, Florida. It has satellite training facilities at Jacksonville’s Cecil and Herlong Recreational airports. The academy says it is approved by the Federal Aviation Administration on its website.

Staly couldn’t confirm how many people were in the airplane as what was a search and rescue operation shifted to a recovery effort that will see a crane brought in to flip it over so investigators can get inside. Staff at the Sunrise Flight Academy’s satellite office at Craig Airport did not wish to comment when reached. But a sign on the front door of its Ormond Beach office said all school activities were cancelled Friday since it is “dealing with an emergency involving one of its aircraft,” according to an image tweeted by First Coast News. The note also states a meeting was set for Friday afternoon with all cadets and instructors.

The Flagler County Sheriff’s Office command post was relocated to the crash site, which is on dry land, to “protect the scene.” The National Transportation Safety Board will take over the crash investigation.

“The indications are no one survived. It is clear one person is deceased inside the aircraft,” Staly said. “We can’t get inside to see how many more.”

Flagler County Sheriff’s Office Chief Mark Strobridge, who saw the wrecked aircraft, said it will be “days or weeks” before investigators can officially confirm who was on board. But rescuers got to the site on foot and via Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission airboat to find the aircraft “fairly intact,” Staly said.

“It was a hard impact,” he said, adding there was no sign of fire.

The Piper Seminole is a 27.6-foot-long aircraft with two 180-hp engines on a 38.6-foot wingspan, and has been built for more than 20 years, according to the aircraft company website.

Coast Guard assisted in the search for survivors, a crew aboard an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater was launched at 2:15 a.m. St. Johns County Sheriff’s Office and Fire Rescue as well as the Volusia County Sheriff’s Office joined in the search efforts.

http://staugustine.com

MARINELAND, FL (WTLV/WJXX) -- The wreckage of a small plane that crashed late Thursday has been found in a remote area near the Flagler-St. Johns County line. Flagler County Sheriff Rick Staly said he believes there were no survivors.

The Flagler County Sheriff's Office confirmed that the plane they found is the same one they had been looking for that flew out of Sunrise Aviation flight school in Ormond Beach near Daytona.

Sunrise Aviation director of training Patrick Murphy told First Coast News that a 27-year-old student from Saudi Arabia and a 70-year-old instructor went missing. He said he believes they were on the plane, but this has yet to be confirmed by authorities.

The FAA said it lost contact with a Piper PA-44 aircraft approximately 22 miles north of Ormond Beach around 11 p.m. Thursday.

The aircraft took off on what the flight school calls a routine flight from St. Simons Island, Georgia and was returning to Ormond Beach when it disappeared. A crew aboard an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter from Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater was launched at 2:15 a.m.

The sheriff said the plane might have clipped a tree before crashing. Witnesses heard what they described as the sound of an engine sputtering.

The 27-year-old student has a young daughter and wife in Saudi Arabia. He was aiming to go back home to fly for an airline, First Coast News has learned.

"Most of our students are international, so we get to know them close," Murphy said. "Students are family, particularly in this kind of program where students come to us for six or 12 months."

Sunrise Aviation has been around since the 1980s. An official with the flight school said this is the first crash in which someone was critically hurt or killed.

2 comments:

Tom Heinsinger Jr said...

So sorry to have learned of the loss of life with this accident. Having known this aircraft very well and having flown it many hours to many destinations was very enjoyable as a pilot. Prayers to the families of those who lost their life.

Anonymous said...

Let's hope we can find the reason this aircraft went down it is not common for this type of aircraft to just drop out of the sky. God bless and god speed to the pilot and instructor.