Monday, December 18, 2017

Cessna 182Q Skylane, N199RN, registered to Western Flying Club Inc and operated by the pilot -and- Piper J3C-65, N25786, registered to Grecor LLC and operated by the pilot: Accident occurred December 16, 2017 near Burlington–Alamance Regional Airport (KBUY), Burlington, Alamance County, North Carolina

The National Transportation Safety Board did not travel to the scene of this accident.

Additional Participating Entity:
Federal Aviation Administration / Flight Standards District Office; Greensboro, North Carolina

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board: https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Western Flying Club Inc: http://registry.faa.gov/N199RN

Location: Burlington, NC
Accident Number: ERA18LA055A
Date & Time: 12/16/2017, 1230 EST
Registration: N199RN
Aircraft: CESSNA 182
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 16, 2017, about 1230 eastern standard time, a Cessna 182Q, N199RN, and a Piper J3C-65, N25786, collided in midair near Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport (BUY), Burlington, North Carolina. The private pilot of the Cessna and the commercial pilot of the Piper were not injured. The Cessna and the Piper both sustained substantial damage. The Cessna was registered to Western Flying Club Inc. and was operated by the pilot. The Piper was registered to Grecor LLC and was operated by the pilot. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as personal flights. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans were filed for either flight. The flights originated at BUY about 1220.

The Piper pilot reported that he had recently performed maintenance on the smoke generator system and installed a new fuel pump. He asked the Cessna pilot to fly adjacent to him to verify the smoke system operation. After departure, the Piper pilot flew on the right side of the Cessna and both pilots acknowledged each other. The Piper pilot turned on the smoke system and the Cessna pilot verified that it operated normally. The Piper pilot then broke-off to the right to leave the formation.

The Piper pilot subsequently elected to fly inverted to check the oil system and mixture control. After clearing for traffic and tightening his harness, he rolled inverted. The systems operated normally, so he rolled again to level the airplane upright. During the return to level flight, he heard a loud noise and the airplane rolled to the right. He believed that he had experienced aileron flutter. He was able to control the airplane and returned to BUY and landed without further incident. It was after landing that he realized that he had collided with the Cessna.

The Cessna pilot reported that, while in straight and level flight, he observed a flash of yellow at his 9 o'clock position, which was the Piper. He reported that the Piper struck his left wing. He was able to maintain airplane control and returned to BUY for landing.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined both airplanes. The right wing and aileron of the Piper were structurally damaged, as was the outboard portion of the Cessna's left wing. No other damage was noted. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: CESSNA
Registration: N199RN
Model/Series: 182 Q
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BUY, 616 ft msl
Observation Time: 1754 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / -5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 250°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Burlington, NC (BUY)
Destination: Burlington, NC (BUY) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 36.049722, -79.473056 (est)

Grecor LLC: http://registry.faa.gov/N25786

Aviation Accident Preliminary Report - National Transportation Safety Board:  https://app.ntsb.gov/pdf

Location: Burlington, NC
Accident Number: ERA18LA055B
Date & Time: 12/16/2017, 1230 EST
Registration: N25786
Aircraft: PIPER J3C
Injuries: 1 None
Flight Conducted Under: Part 91: General Aviation - Personal 

On December 16, 2017, about 1230 eastern standard time, a Cessna 182Q, N199RN, and a Piper J3C-65, N25786, collided in midair near Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport (BUY), Burlington, North Carolina. The private pilot of the Cessna and the commercial pilot of the Piper were not injured. The Cessna and the Piper both sustained substantial damage. The Cessna was registered to Western Flying Club Inc. and was operated by the pilot. The Piper was registered to Grecor LLC and was operated by the pilot. Both flights were conducted under the provisions of Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations part 91 as personal flights. Day, visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and no flight plans were filed for either flight. The flights originated at BUY about 1220.

The Piper pilot reported that he had recently performed maintenance on the smoke generator system and installed a new fuel pump. He asked the Cessna pilot to fly adjacent to him to verify the smoke system operation. After departure, the Piper pilot flew on the right side of the Cessna and both pilots acknowledged each other. The Piper pilot turned on the smoke system and the Cessna pilot verified that it operated normally. The Piper pilot then broke-off to the right to leave the formation.

The Piper pilot subsequently elected to fly inverted to check the oil system and mixture control. After clearing for traffic and tightening his harness, he rolled inverted. The systems operated normally, so he rolled again to level the airplane upright. During the return to level flight, he heard a loud noise and the airplane rolled to the right. He believed that he had experienced aileron flutter. He was able to control the airplane and returned to BUY and landed without further incident. It was after landing that he realized that he had collided with the Cessna.

The Cessna pilot reported that, while in straight and level flight, he observed a flash of yellow at his 9 o'clock position, which was the Piper. He reported that the Piper struck his left wing. He was able to maintain airplane control and returned to BUY for landing.

An inspector with the Federal Aviation Administration responded to the accident site and examined both airplanes. The right wing and aileron of the Piper were structurally damaged, as was the outboard portion of the Cessna's left wing. No other damage was noted. 

Aircraft and Owner/Operator Information

Aircraft Manufacturer: PIPER
Registration: N25786
Model/Series: J3C 65
Aircraft Category: Airplane
Amateur Built: No
Operator: On file
Operating Certificate(s) Held: None 

Meteorological Information and Flight Plan

Conditions at Accident Site: Visual Conditions
Condition of Light: Day
Observation Facility, Elevation: BUY, 616 ft msl
Observation Time: 1754 UTC
Distance from Accident Site: 10 Nautical Miles
Temperature/Dew Point: 9°C / -5°C
Lowest Cloud Condition: Clear
Wind Speed/Gusts, Direction: 7 knots, 250°
Lowest Ceiling: None
Visibility:  10 Miles
Altimeter Setting: 30.2 inches Hg
Type of Flight Plan Filed: None
Departure Point: Burlington, NC (BUY)
Destination: Burlington, NC (BUY) 

Wreckage and Impact Information

Crew Injuries: 1 None
Aircraft Damage: Substantial
Passenger Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Fire: None
Ground Injuries: N/A
Aircraft Explosion: None
Total Injuries: 1 None
Latitude, Longitude: 36.049722, -79.473056 (est)




"Two planes hit in midair. Their pilots somehow landed safely. We spent the last week chasing down this story and finally got confirmation today, December 28th." -Times-News

Two planes apparently sustained minor damage after a midair collision December 16 a few miles from the Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport.

“My unconfirmed understanding is that on Saturday, December 16, 2017, two aircraft that had departed the Burlington Alamance Regional airport were flying in an area approximately 5 to 10 nautical miles north of the Burlington Alamance Regional Airport. While in flight, the two aircraft came in physical contact,” Airport Manager Dan Danieley wrote in a statement to the Times-News. “The pilots did in fact safely return both aircraft to the Burlington Alamance Regional Airport and to their respective airplane hangars. The Federal Aviation Administration was called in to investigate the incident. The Federal Aviation Administration has turned over the investigation to the National Transportation Safety Board, with whom the investigation remains.”

Five to 10 nautical miles (about 5.75 to 11.5 statute miles) due north of the airport would be about from David Moore and Stoney Creek Church roads, northeast of Altamahaw, to U.S. 158 near Casville in Caswell County.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration registry, the two planes were a Cessna 182Q belonging to the Western Flying Club — the club’s newest plane, according to its Facebook page — and a Piper JC3-65 belonging to Grecor LLC of Asheville, Ala., which operates under the name Greg Koontz Airshows.

“I wasn’t in the plane; I would not be the one to tell you anything about it,” said Greg Koontz, owner of Greg Koontz Airshows. “I’m still waiting on the reports myself.”

The Western Flying Club is based at the airport. The Times-News received unconfirmed photos of a plane with the same tail number as its plane, showing a piece of the tip of the left wing missing and wires hanging, and another plane with no visible identifying information and with damage going about halfway along the back of its right wing.

Christopher O’Neil, National Transportation Safety Board chief of media relations, confirmed there was a “limited investigation” ongoing. In response to a Facebook message from the Times-News, the Western Flying Club referred questions to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Accidents at the Burlington-Alamance Regional Airport have been rare in the past few years. A crash Feb. 16 damaged the wing of a Cessna 172M belonging to Missionary Air Group at the end of a runway. That incident was blamed on crosswinds. Before that, no accident had been reported at the airport since 2013.

2013 was, however, a bad year.

On Jan. 16, 2013, David Gamble, 57, died in the crash of a Pilatus PC-12 carrying LabCorp samples. The National Transportation Safety Board concluded Gamble became disoriented after the nighttime take-off, possibly while being distracted resetting the plane’s transponder.

On Dec. 16, 2013, there was a non-fatal accident with a Cessna 182T while the pilot was practicing takeoffs and landings. Mechanical error was a possible explanation but not a certainty, according to the National Transportation Safety Board report.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://www.thetimesnews.com

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