Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Spirit Airlines, Airbus A319-100, N505NK: Incident occurred September 18, 2017 at Detroit Metro Airport (KDTW), Michigan

http://registry.faa.gov/N505NK


Although it will take weeks to figure out what went wrong, the Federal Aviation Administration is investigating an incident with a Spirit aircraft that dropped pieces of the plane in residential areas after experiencing engine failure.

According to the FAA, the flight took off Sept. 18 from Detroit Metropolitan Airport headed for Atlanta.

When it began having engine failure shortly after departure, the pilot returned to Metro Airport and landed the plane without incident.

Pieces of the plane were found and collected on the runway.

Officials thought the debris was contained just to that particular location.

That proved not to be the case as residents along the short flight path began contacting the FAA about finding pieces from the airfield.

“The FAA is interested in collecting these pieces so we can determine if they came from an aircraft, and if so, if they came from the same aircraft,” a statement from the administration said.

The investigation, according to the FAA, is being conducted to determine what happened and why, so steps can be taken prevent such events from occurring again.

The statement, the investigation was launched as soon as the administration was notified of the aircraft’s engine failure


http://www.thenewsherald.com

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating a Spirit Airlines flight that resulted in plane pieces landing in the yards of metro Detroit residents.

On Monday evening, a Spirit Airlines flight from Detroit to Atlanta had to return to Detroit Metro Airport after experiencing engine failure, according to the FAA. The flight was able to land without any incidents, however, in the process, some pieces from the plane landed in the yards of nearby residents. 

The FAA sent investigators to look into what went awry the following day. Part of their investigation will include looking at pieces that landed in the yards.

"It's hard to speculate, we will determine the cause of the incident," said Tony Molinaro a FAA spokesperson based out of Chicago.

Molinaro said the investigation should be concluded in the coming weeks.

One Spirit passenger on the flight that had to be re-routed Monday told the Free Press in an email that the flight was "about 5,000" feet in the air  when there was "a large bang and the plane started to shake and shutter."

The passenger said the right engine was on fire, sparking and losing metal.

Story and comments ➤ http://www.freep.com

ROMULUS (WWJ/AP) – The mystery behind metal objects the fell from the sky in metro Detroit has been all but solved.

The Federal Aviation Administration says the fragments found by residents in a Dearborn Heights neighborhood earlier this week are most likely parts of the engine of a Spirit Airlines jet.

The FAA said it’s still investigating after the pieces were found in residential yards, not far from Detroit Metro Airport.

A Spirit Airlines flight from Detroit to Atlanta returned to the airport after experiencing engine failure Monday evening. The flight was able to land without incident, and pieces from the aircraft were initially thought to be contained to an airport runway.

One passenger on the flight told the Detroit Free Press in an email that the flight was “about 5,000” feet in the air when there was “a large bang and the plane started to shake and shutter.” The passenger said the right engine was on fire, sparking and losing metal.

No injuries were reported.

The FAA says it’s “interested in collecting these pieces so we can determine if they came from an aircraft, and if so, if they came from the same aircraft.” FAA spokeswoman Elizabeth Isham Cory said the investigation could last several weeks.

An email requesting comment was sent to Miramar, Florida-based Spirit Airlines.

Original article can be found here ➤ http://detroit.cbslocal.com

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